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Re: [FH] Strokes in cats....

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  • Westgold
    Your kitty is very blessed to have someone like you to take care of her! You re right, they don t know that they have a problem, they just carry on and do
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 16, 2011
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      Your kitty is very blessed to have someone like you to take care of her! You're right, they don't know that they have a problem, they just carry on and do what they need to do. They can adapt to a LOT. I also read something recently that stated that in animals who have strokes, different parts of their brains take over for the damaged parts much faster than happens in humans.

      I hope this isn't a silly question. A stroke is usually caused by a blood clot in the brain. Could these be the same clots that our kitties throw that can end up as a saddle thrombosis, only they go to the brain instead of the spine? Could they have the same cause, and be the same clots, just going to a different place in the body?
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: elfinmyst@...
      To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 7:43 AM
      Subject: Re: [FH] Strokes in cats....



      (This was meant for group)


      Hi, Jenny

      My cat is 14, female and an Abby. she had a series of strokes over the
      past 6 months, the latest one week ago. She had MRI and blood work ups. The
      MRI showed cerebral damage from a blood clot. Other test came back clean.
      Unknown as to why she is throwing off clots She may have high blood pressure
      but because she gets so stressed out at the vets that getting a normal
      reading is all about impossible. Sedation will give a false reading. Both her
      primary vet and the neurologist vet stated that most feline strokes are of an
      unknown cause. No medications are available for feline stroke and baby
      aspirin and coumidin are not meant for cats, you would be replacing one set of
      problems with another (liver damage and internal bleeding). I dropped
      $2500.00 on vets and people tell me why don't have her put to sleep. All that I
      have researched regarding feline strokes is that recovery is possible which
      was true for the prior two. This one is more serious. It has effected her
      left side extremities where walking and stand are very difficult. She has a
      hard time getting into the litter box so I am trying low cut dish pan. She
      has control over bowel and bladder and if you pay attention to timing and
      body language you will know when she needs to go and take to the box. She
      cognition is good and she is interested in her environment, recognizes her
      name, etc. She is relearning to adapt though it is painful for me to watch
      her struggle to stand and walk but she must learn to adapt. She has so much
      life in her that putting her to sleep at the first sign of trouble I felt
      would have been premature without knowing the full extent of her ability to
      adapt. She may be facing a continued series of strokes and if they seriously
      compromise her quality of life, well,,,,,, I have found a trick to use
      when I have to leave her to go to work. I baby gate off a section of the
      bathroom, lay down pee-pads and on top of that lay down rubber bathmats the kind
      with lots of tiny holes. Along with the makeshift low cut litter box. She
      makes the attempt to get to the litter box but sometimes she "misses".
      Urine goes through the holes in the bathmat and is absorbed into the pee pads.
      And because the mats are rubber they stay dry and she is not laying on
      anything wet. Just rinse off the mats in bath tub, spray with Lysol and your
      good to go. I am willing to care for my disabled cat as far as we can go. I
      can adapt too.

      Please share this with all the cat parents caring for a disabled kitty. I
      would like to have feed back on how others are adapting to their special
      needs kitty.

      Thanks a million for listening,
      Holly

      _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • MAUREEN FOGG
      Interetesting question about the clots.  I wonder if nattokinase would be helpful? Maureen ________________________________ From: Westgold
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 16, 2011
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        Interetesting question about the clots.  I wonder if nattokinase would be
        helpful?
        Maureen




        ________________________________
        From: Westgold <westgold@...>
        To: elfinmyst@...; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wed, November 16, 2011 12:45:41 PM
        Subject: Re: [FH] Strokes in cats....

         
        Your kitty is very blessed to have someone like you to take care of her! You're
        right, they don't know that they have a problem, they just carry on and do what
        they need to do. They can adapt to a LOT. I also read something recently that
        stated that in animals who have strokes, different parts of their brains take
        over for the damaged parts much faster than happens in humans.


        I hope this isn't a silly question. A stroke is usually caused by a blood clot
        in the brain. Could these be the same clots that our kitties throw that can end
        up as a saddle thrombosis, only they go to the brain instead of the spine? Could
        they have the same cause, and be the same clots, just going to a different place
        in the body?

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: elfinmyst@...
        To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 7:43 AM
        Subject: Re: [FH] Strokes in cats....

        (This was meant for group)

        Hi, Jenny

        My cat is 14, female and an Abby. she had a series of strokes over the
        past 6 months, the latest one week ago. She had MRI and blood work ups. The
        MRI showed cerebral damage from a blood clot. Other test came back clean.
        Unknown as to why she is throwing off clots She may have high blood pressure
        but because she gets so stressed out at the vets that getting a normal
        reading is all about impossible. Sedation will give a false reading. Both her
        primary vet and the neurologist vet stated that most feline strokes are of an
        unknown cause. No medications are available for feline stroke and baby
        aspirin and coumidin are not meant for cats, you would be replacing one set of
        problems with another (liver damage and internal bleeding). I dropped
        $2500.00 on vets and people tell me why don't have her put to sleep. All that I
        have researched regarding feline strokes is that recovery is possible which
        was true for the prior two. This one is more serious. It has effected her
        left side extremities where walking and stand are very difficult. She has a
        hard time getting into the litter box so I am trying low cut dish pan. She
        has control over bowel and bladder and if you pay attention to timing and
        body language you will know when she needs to go and take to the box. She
        cognition is good and she is interested in her environment, recognizes her
        name, etc. She is relearning to adapt though it is painful for me to watch
        her struggle to stand and walk but she must learn to adapt. She has so much
        life in her that putting her to sleep at the first sign of trouble I felt
        would have been premature without knowing the full extent of her ability to
        adapt. She may be facing a continued series of strokes and if they seriously
        compromise her quality of life, well,,,,,, I have found a trick to use
        when I have to leave her to go to work. I baby gate off a section of the
        bathroom, lay down pee-pads and on top of that lay down rubber bathmats the kind

        with lots of tiny holes. Along with the makeshift low cut litter box. She
        makes the attempt to get to the litter box but sometimes she "misses".
        Urine goes through the holes in the bathmat and is absorbed into the pee pads.
        And because the mats are rubber they stay dry and she is not laying on
        anything wet. Just rinse off the mats in bath tub, spray with Lysol and your
        good to go. I am willing to care for my disabled cat as far as we can go. I
        can adapt too.

        Please share this with all the cat parents caring for a disabled kitty. I
        would like to have feed back on how others are adapting to their special
        needs kitty.

        Thanks a million for listening,
        Holly

        _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • elfinmyst@aol.com
        Hi Blood clots can go the the femoral artery, the coronary artery or the lungs or brain. In cats they more often go to the fork in the artery to the back legs,
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 16, 2011
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          Hi

          Blood clots can go the the femoral artery, the coronary artery or the lungs
          or brain. In cats they more often go to the fork in the artery to the back
          legs, but I have Trixi who had a clot that caused a heart attack and Josh
          whose clot caused a stroke.

          It's true cats recover use of their brain faster than humans because the
          other parts take over function. They're not as specialised as a human where
          one brain part can only do one job.

          Lyn:)

          _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • C.R.
          I do think that the nattokinase would be helpful, because it s supposed to keep the blood from accumulating the fibrin that the clot can form from. So I think
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 16, 2011
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            I do think that the nattokinase would be helpful, because it's supposed to keep the blood from accumulating the fibrin that the clot can form from. So I think the nattokinase along with "digesting" clots that are present, can help prevent them from forming. Of course we don't really have proof of that, because there aren't really any "official" studies done, but in Japan, they have been using nattokinase for treatment of clots for many years, so there must be some validity to it. I'd like to find out if there are studies from Japan that can verify all the anecdotal "evidence". If anyone ever comes across something like that, please send it to me and we can put it in the files here.

            hugs,
            Carol and the gang

            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, MAUREEN FOGG <maureen.fogg@...> wrote:
            >
            > Interetesting question about the clots.  I wonder if nattokinase would be
            > helpful?
            > Maureen
            >
            >
            >
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