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Prep for Cardiologist Step One...Done!

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  • mec2973
    We just finished step one of going to see the cardiologist. I took Skip in to his regular vet this past weekend for his blood work and urine sample. The
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 1, 2011
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      We just finished step one of going to see the cardiologist. I took Skip in to his regular vet this past weekend for his blood work and urine sample. The results are already back this morning and they look great the regular vet said.

      It was also time for his regular checkup. He did fine as usual. His heart murmur is still a level 4. He was a level 4 two years ago when they found it.

      Skip's regular vet does want to clean his teeth as he has plaque build up. She said that it should be quick as he doesn't need any extractions. I told her that I would make the appointment once the cardiologist visit is done and the cardiologist gives the OK. She said that since Skip is easy going at their office that they are able to gas him instead of put him out through IV. That's what they did last time which helps him to come out of anesthesia much faster. She said not all cats will let them do gas which is why they love working with such an easy going guy.

      Now for step two - to worry until August 16th when we go to the cardiologist.
    • acrocat@rocketmail.com
      Yay for the appt with the cardiologist. Yikes for the gas! All patients undergoing anesthesia should have an IV catheter and be properly sedated. Gassing
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 1, 2011
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        Yay for the appt with the cardiologist. Yikes for the gas! All patients undergoing anesthesia should have an IV catheter and be properly sedated. "Gassing" cats involves holding a plastic mask over their face or putting them in a plexi-glass box and pumping gas into it. Cats generally find this frightening, which is understandable. "Not letting them do the gas" probably means the cats freak out so much they injure themselves. I don't want to rock the boat here but there are very, very few situations in which gas is the only option and although it was once considered quite safe, it has seriously fallen out of favor in the past few years.

        Here's a site with some references: http://vettechs.blogspot.com/2005/07/masking-down-safer-way-to-anesthetize.html


        Adriann
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