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Clipsy update

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  • Jim Sinclair
    I took Clipsy to my vet the other day for a follow-up exam and blood work. This is the cat who pretty much died in my arms back in January. I did chest
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 16, 2011
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      I took Clipsy to my vet the other day for a follow-up exam and blood
      work. This is the cat who pretty much died in my arms back in January.
      I did chest compressions and rushed her to the emergency hospital,
      where the vet diagnosed CHF, pronounced her prognosis to be "grave,"
      and suggested euthanasia, stating that even if I opted to drive Clipsy
      to the Cornell University hospital for intensive care, and even if she
      survived the rest of that night, she would only live a matter of days
      or possibly weeks at most, and she would be weak and suffering and
      gasping for breath until she died.

      I rejected euthanasia and drove her to Cornell. She sat in my lap and
      purred the whole way there. She came home the next evening, with a
      prescription for furosemide in addition to the benazepril she was
      already on for her blood pressure.

      She has now survived about five and a half months. She eats, she
      purrs, she cuddles, she scampers up the stairs at feeding time, she
      rolls around on her back to get her tummy rubbed, and I have not seen
      her gasp for breath since that night back in January when she was
      diagnosed.

      So anyway, I took her to my own vet this week for a follow-up. The vet
      listened to her heart and got a very serious thoughtful expression on
      her face. I wondered if she was hearing something really grim. But
      after listening carefully and intently for a few minutes, my vet took
      the stethoscope out of her ears and said, "Her heart sounds great!"

      I asked, "great" by what frame of reference? Cats with heart disease?
      Cats who were supposed to be dead five months ago?

      She said no, "great" for a cat in general. She heard no murmur, no
      gallop, just a normal-sounding heartbeat. She said if she were
      examining this cat for the first time and didn't know anything about
      her history, she would not be able to detect any indication of heart
      disease. (I'm not sure whether to be happy that Clipsy is doing so
      well, or worried that serious heart disease can be so hard to detect
      and maybe my other cats have it too!)

      Then Clipsy had blood drawn for a chem panel. I got email from the vet
      yesterday: "Clipsy's bloodwork looks great-kidney parameters and
      potassium are normal."

      She's supposed to have a repeat echocardiogram too. My vet said she
      would call the cardiologist at Cornell and ask if I should bring
      Clipsy back to Cornell for that, or if it can be done here in Syracuse
      by a vet who's a board-certified radiologist but not a cardiologist.

      Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
      www.jimsinclair.org
      http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
    • Carol
      Jim, I really love to hear good updates. I m so glad that Clipsy is doing so well. Thank you for sharing all this. After a really hard day with Misty, it was
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 17, 2011
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        Jim,

        I really love to hear good updates. I'm so glad that Clipsy is doing so well. Thank you for sharing all this. After a really hard day with Misty, it was good to turn on the computer and read some good news! It's really an inspiration to everyone to hear that there is hope for us with our kitties.

        You go, Clipsy!

        Carol and Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*
        and the gang
        http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/


        and the gang
        http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Judi Levens
        what great news Jim...you must be thrilled! I hope this continues. I had this kind of experience with Max also...he kept getting so much better that they d
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 17, 2011
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          what great news Jim...you must be thrilled! I hope this continues. I had this kind of experience with Max also...he kept getting so much better that they'd want to discontinue meds, and then he'd revert, so finally I just said no to stopping meds. We stopped lasix and I kept a supply in case of emergency, but he stayed on his enalapril. His last vet visit the cardiologist said that his heart was no longer enlarged on the left side but that he could hear arrythmia, so he changed his dx from HCM to "unclassified" heart disease. I think this means that the meds work, and that some cats respond better than others to them. I would go back to the cardiologist for the echo just because they are the experts at reading them...also, it's probably less at Cornel? It was at Davis where I took Max.
          btw, while he died of a heart related thing, I think he had other complications which caused his death...so Max survived 3.5 years after dx (at 14.5) and might have gone longer if everything else was OK...take care...Judi and Angel Max







          To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          From: jisincla@...
          Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:15:33 -0400
          Subject: [FH] Clipsy update






          I took Clipsy to my vet the other day for a follow-up exam and blood
          work. This is the cat who pretty much died in my arms back in January.
          I did chest compressions and rushed her to the emergency hospital,
          where the vet diagnosed CHF, pronounced her prognosis to be "grave,"
          and suggested euthanasia, stating that even if I opted to drive Clipsy
          to the Cornell University hospital for intensive care, and even if she
          survived the rest of that night, she would only live a matter of days
          or possibly weeks at most, and she would be weak and suffering and
          gasping for breath until she died.

          I rejected euthanasia and drove her to Cornell. She sat in my lap and
          purred the whole way there. She came home the next evening, with a
          prescription for furosemide in addition to the benazepril she was
          already on for her blood pressure.

          She has now survived about five and a half months. She eats, she
          purrs, she cuddles, she scampers up the stairs at feeding time, she
          rolls around on her back to get her tummy rubbed, and I have not seen
          her gasp for breath since that night back in January when she was
          diagnosed.

          So anyway, I took her to my own vet this week for a follow-up. The vet
          listened to her heart and got a very serious thoughtful expression on
          her face. I wondered if she was hearing something really grim. But
          after listening carefully and intently for a few minutes, my vet took
          the stethoscope out of her ears and said, "Her heart sounds great!"

          I asked, "great" by what frame of reference? Cats with heart disease?
          Cats who were supposed to be dead five months ago?

          She said no, "great" for a cat in general. She heard no murmur, no
          gallop, just a normal-sounding heartbeat. She said if she were
          examining this cat for the first time and didn't know anything about
          her history, she would not be able to detect any indication of heart
          disease. (I'm not sure whether to be happy that Clipsy is doing so
          well, or worried that serious heart disease can be so hard to detect
          and maybe my other cats have it too!)

          Then Clipsy had blood drawn for a chem panel. I got email from the vet
          yesterday: "Clipsy's bloodwork looks great-kidney parameters and
          potassium are normal."

          She's supposed to have a repeat echocardiogram too. My vet said she
          would call the cardiologist at Cornell and ask if I should bring
          Clipsy back to Cornell for that, or if it can be done here in Syracuse
          by a vet who's a board-certified radiologist but not a cardiologist.

          Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
          www.jimsinclair.org
          http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com





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