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Instructions for pet sitter (plus quick reference sheet for me)?

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  • Jim Sinclair
    I m going to be out of the country for a couple of weeks and will leave Clipsy with friends who are very experienced with sick kitties, but have not had one
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 10, 2011
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      I'm going to be out of the country for a couple of weeks and will
      leave Clipsy with friends who are very experienced with sick kitties,
      but have not had one with Clipsy's condition (hypertrophic
      cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure) before. I'm preparing
      instructions for my friends about Clipsy's medications and supplements
      (furosemide, benazepril, CoQ10, and just about to start L-carnitine
      and nattokinase because the snowplows finally got to my street so UPS
      was able to get to my street to deliver my order of supplements
      yesterday).

      They also need to know what signs to look for in case Clipsy needs to
      be taken to a vet or emergency hospital. I have some handwritten notes
      that I wrote down when I met with the cardiologist (nine weeks ago
      today!) after Clipsy's diagnosis:

      If breathing rate more than 40 (sustained) with effort: Give extra
      furosemide dose, call vet.

      Without effort: No furosemide, call vet.

      If gasping/labored breathing: Give furosemide if possible, transport
      to hospital immediately for IV furosemide.


      And that's all the information I came home with nine weeks ago. Since
      then I have joined this group, learned about saddle thrombosis, and
      ordered a stethoscope from eBay so I can listen to her heart as well
      as monitor her breathing.

      What I need to know, and be able to tell my friends, is:

      When the cardiologist said if her respiration rate is more than 40 per
      minute "sustained," what does that mean? How long is "sustained"? I
      guess it doesn't mean if she's breathing 50 times a minute while
      enthusiastically purring and nuzzling, and so far I've never measured
      it at more than 30 (usually closer to 24) when she's just lying curled
      up relaxing.

      What should her heart rate be, and what should we listen for with the
      stethoscope to know if she needs to see a vet right away? Last time my
      vet examined her at the office, her heart rate was over 200. At home
      it's generally between about 120-140.

      What about blood clots? What are the signs to watch for? Hind leg
      paralysis? Anything else?

      Any other questions I've forgotten to ask? Is there a care sheet kind
      of thing that people can put up on their wall or refrigerator as a
      quick reference guide to caring for a HCM/CHF cat?

      Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
      www.jimsinclair.org
      http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
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