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Rapid heart rate cause?

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  • C.R.
    Hi everyone, We ve been having a real problem trying to figure out why Misty s heart rate is so high all the time. It s always 180 to 200, and sometimes over
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
      Hi everyone,

      We've been having a real problem trying to figure out why Misty's heart rate is so high all the time. It's always 180 to 200, and sometimes over 200. The vets, her regular vet, the holistic vet and the internist, can't find any physical reason why.

      She doesn't have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but does have a grade 3 murmur. She's had a heart ultrasound every six months for the past two years and they keep telling us there's nothing going on with her heart except the murmur.

      Her blood pressure is under control with taking her Amlodipine. Her kidney values are stable with her bun in the mid 40's and creatinine in the high 2's. Those have been around that for several months now. She's taking Tapazole (Methimazole) for her hyperthyroid and on her bloodwork two weeks ago she's still slightly hyperthyroid. The vet increased the Tapazole dose, and she's been on that for over a week now and still her heart rate is high. Last night while resting on the bed it was 184.

      So what's causing her heart rate to be so high?

      Even with the holistic vet doing acupuncture once a week, and Misty taking some Chinese herbs for her heart (also takes coQ10 and hawthorne), we can't get her heart rate to be more in the normal range.

      We're so afraid that this is going the same way as it did with her sister, Snowball. Snowball had an uncontrolled rapid heart rate for the last year of her life. Snowball had all the same problems as Misty, but also had HCM, and I'm really worried that all this fast heart pumping is going to wear out Misty's heart like with Snowball.

      The vets are hesitant to put Misty on any medication, like Atenolol, because of the side effects to her kidneys. So we're sitting here just doing nothing and worrying about the direction this is going...which isn't a good one.

      Any ideas on what can cause such a fast heart rate in the absence of HCM? And any ideas on what we can do for it would be really appreciated.

      Thanks,
      Carol and Angel Snowball
      and the gang
    • Westgold
      I would look first at the herbs -- many of them have caffeine-like substances and other stimulants. Just because something is natural doesn t make it safe.
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
        I would look first at the herbs -- many of them have caffeine-like substances and other stimulants. Just because something is natural doesn't make it safe. I'd try stopping all of them first, for 3 weeks to get everything out of her system, then add back one at a time, etc to see which one is the problem. Well, Q10 doesn't have any stimulants, but I'd be suspicious of all the others. Can atenolol also be given to kitties who don't have HCM? It slows the heart rate a bit. Let's hope Dr Lorie can comment --

        take care -- Michelle & Tigger Too in Toronto

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Carol
        hi Michelle, Misty is on only two Chinese herbal remedies, and neither one of them has any caffeine or stimulating ingredients in them. Our holistic vet is
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
          hi Michelle,

          Misty is on only two Chinese herbal remedies, and neither one of them has any caffeine or stimulating ingredients in them. Our holistic vet is using only things on Misty that don't have stuff like that in them. I was really clear with her that I didn't want Misty having anything like that, and she actually looks up all the herbs and reactions before she gives them to her patients too.

          She has from time to time had me stop Misty's herbs and supplements, except for the coQ10, which I won't stop because it's not adviseable to stop coQ10 cold turkey. She's been on it for 5 years ever since being diagnosed with her murmur and only has had the fast heart rate for the past year, so I don't think the coQ10 is contributing to the problem. So everytime we stop all the herbs and supplements, nothing changes with her heart rate. So I'm really stumped.

          I think you can give Atenolol to non-HCM kitties, but because Misty's got CRF that she's been dealing with since 2006, the vets are afraid if they give her a drug to slow her heart rate down, that she won't get enough blood pumped through for her kidneys, so they're not really gung ho on doing that.

          I just with we could find out what's causing it. After quite a few exams, ultrasounds, xrays, and bloodwork, we still come up with nothing that may be contributing to the fast heart rate. Steve and I want to get this taken care of, before her little heart wears out. We weren't successful with it with Snowball, and we're seeing Misty go down the same path... and we don't want to lose her to the same thing...at least not yet anyway. I know she's Snowball's sister and they may have the same physical problems, but Misty's been healthier all along and stronger, so we're hoping she'll be around for longer. She'll be 20 in May, but except for her heart....the rest of her body is doing pretty good.

          thanks,
          Carol and Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*

          and the gang
          http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/



          -----Original Message-----
          From: Westgold westgold@...


          I would look first at the herbs -- many of them have caffeine-like substances and other stimulants.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carol
          hi Lyn, No...see that s the problem. They ve done two ultrasounds on Misty since last summer and they haven t found anything abnormal going on with her heart.
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
            hi Lyn,

            No...see that's the problem. They've done two ultrasounds on Misty since last summer and they haven't found anything abnormal going on with her heart. They measure the heart walls and they're normal. They look at the flow and they said everything looks normal. So we don't even know why she has a murmur, except that both her sister Snowball and brother Bouncer both had them, so maybe they were all just born with murmurs.

            Carol and Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*
            and the gang
            http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Elfinmyst

            , have they found a reason for the murmur like a leaky valve?

            Lyn



            Lyn


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Westgold
            The only other thing I can think of is perhaps a reaction to some foods. I am sensitive to something in wheat (but NOT gluten) -- when I eat wheat after not
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
              The only other thing I can think of is perhaps a reaction to some foods. I am sensitive to something in wheat (but NOT gluten) -- when I eat wheat after not having it for a while, my heart rate goes up considerably for about an hour. Have you changed her food recently?
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Carol
              To: westgold@... ; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 1:48 PM
              Subject: Re: [FH] Rapid heart rate cause?


              hi Michelle,

              Misty is on only two Chinese herbal remedies, and neither one of them has any caffeine or stimulating ingredients in them. Our holistic vet is using only things on Misty that don't have stuff like that in them. I was really clear with her that I didn't want Misty having anything like that, and she actually looks up all the herbs and reactions before she gives them to her patients too.

              She has from time to time had me stop Misty's herbs and supplements, except for the coQ10, which I won't stop because it's not adviseable to stop coQ10 cold turkey. She's been on it for 5 years ever since being diagnosed with her murmur and only has had the fast heart rate for the past year, so I don't think the coQ10 is contributing to the problem. So everytime we stop all the herbs and supplements, nothing changes with her heart rate. So I'm really stumped.

              I think you can give Atenolol to non-HCM kitties, but because Misty's got CRF that she's been dealing with since 2006, the vets are afraid if they give her a drug to slow her heart rate down, that she won't get enough blood pumped through for her kidneys, so they're not really gung ho on doing that.

              I just with we could find out what's causing it. After quite a few exams, ultrasounds, xrays, and bloodwork, we still come up with nothing that may be contributing to the fast heart rate. Steve and I want to get this taken care of, before her little heart wears out. We weren't successful with it with Snowball, and we're seeing Misty go down the same path... and we don't want to lose her to the same thing...at least not yet anyway. I know she's Snowball's sister and they may have the same physical problems, but Misty's been healthier all along and stronger, so we're hoping she'll be around for longer. She'll be 20 in May, but except for her heart....the rest of her body is doing pretty good.

              thanks,
              Carol and Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*
              and the gang
              http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/



              -----Original Message-----
              From: Westgold westgold@...


              I would look first at the herbs -- many of them have caffeine-like substances and other stimulants.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Carol
              Oh gosh, Michelle, that could really be something!? About?4 months ago we started changing Misty s food over to Primal Raw chicken.? She was eating Wellness
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
                Oh gosh, Michelle, that could really be something!? About?4 months ago we started changing Misty's food over to Primal Raw chicken.? She was eating Wellness canned chicken, but kept puking all the time, so we switched over to the raw. We did it slowly over the course of two weeks or so. I didn't really connect the fast heart rate with that, but you know... it could be.? I know it was switching from chicken to chicken, canned to raw, but, the other ingredients are different... the veggies in the foods are different.? I'm going to compare the two and see what the differences are.
                ?
                Thanks so much!? I don't know if that's the culprit, but it's surely worth investigating!
                ?
                Carol and Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*
                and the gang?
                http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/

                ?
                ?

                ?
                -----Original Message-----
                The only other thing I can think of is perhaps a reaction to some foods.? I am sensitive to something in wheat (but NOT gluten) -- when I eat wheat after not having it for a while, my heart rate goes up considerably for about an hour.? Have you changed her food recently?



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • LorieAHuston@cs.com
                Hi, Carol. I m sorry to hear about Misty s problems. It may be difficult to track down the exact cause of Misty s elevated heart rate. You mentioned that she
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
                  Hi, Carol.

                  I'm sorry to hear about Misty's problems. It may be difficult to track down the exact cause of Misty's elevated heart rate. You mentioned that she suffers from hyperthyroidism and that her thyroid levels (I assume T4 levels?) are still a little high. Hyperthyroidism can cause an increased heart rate. However, so can kidney disease, which she seems to have problems with as well. Though her values seem stable, they are still a little higher than normal and kidney disease could be playing a role in the elevated heart rate. Hypertension (high blood pressure) can cause an elevated heart rate as well but I believe you said that is under control. At any rate, there may actually be a combination of things that are contributing to causing her heart rate to be high.

                  The other thing that came to mind when you mentioned an elevated heart rate is pain. Pain from any cause (arthritis, etc.) can cause an increased heart rate.

                  Unfortunately, the first step in treating the elevated heart rate is finding the cause. I think you've already got a start on that by controlling the blood pressure. You're working on the thyroid issues as well. If her kidney values are stable, I'm not sure there's much more you can do there. If you believe there is any reason she might be in pain, that could be a problem that needs treating.

                  You mentioned several vets (a regular vet, a holistic vet, an internist). However, if you haven't seen a cardiologist, you might want to consider that. Some types of heart disease are extremely difficult to diagnose and a cardiologist might be able to spot something the others haven't simply because they have more training and more experience with these types of issues. (Please understand I'm not suggesting that the other vets are not good at what they do.) Also, if an ECG (or EKG, if you prefer that term) has not been performed, you might ask your vets about doing that as well to help rule out arrhythmias (irregular heart rate/rhythm).

                  Atenolol is, indeed, used in cats. However, I agree with your vets that I wouldn't rush into that without an accurate diagnosis first.

                  I hope this helps a little bit. I wish I could give you a more definitive answer.

                  Lorie Huston, DVM
                  www.pet-health-care-gazette.com






                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: C.R. <carolroar@...>
                  To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tue, Jan 25, 2011 1:06 pm
                  Subject: [FH] Rapid heart rate cause?




                  Hi everyone,

                  We've been having a real problem trying to figure out why Misty's heart rate is so high all the time. It's always 180 to 200, and sometimes over 200. The vets, her regular vet, the holistic vet and the internist, can't find any physical reason why.

                  She doesn't have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but does have a grade 3 murmur. She's had a heart ultrasound every six months for the past two years and they keep telling us there's nothing going on with her heart except the murmur.

                  Her blood pressure is under control with taking her Amlodipine. Her kidney values are stable with her bun in the mid 40's and creatinine in the high 2's. Those have been around that for several months now. She's taking Tapazole (Methimazole) for her hyperthyroid and on her bloodwork two weeks ago she's still slightly hyperthyroid. The vet increased the Tapazole dose, and she's been on that for over a week now and still her heart rate is high. Last night while resting on the bed it was 184.

                  So what's causing her heart rate to be so high?

                  Even with the holistic vet doing acupuncture once a week, and Misty taking some Chinese herbs for her heart (also takes coQ10 and hawthorne), we can't get her heart rate to be more in the normal range.

                  We're so afraid that this is going the same way as it did with her sister, Snowball. Snowball had an uncontrolled rapid heart rate for the last year of her life. Snowball had all the same problems as Misty, but also had HCM, and I'm really worried that all this fast heart pumping is going to wear out Misty's heart like with Snowball.

                  The vets are hesitant to put Misty on any medication, like Atenolol, because of the side effects to her kidneys. So we're sitting here just doing nothing and worrying about the direction this is going...which isn't a good one.

                  Any ideas on what can cause such a fast heart rate in the absence of HCM? And any ideas on what we can do for it would be really appreciated.

                  Thanks,
                  Carol and Angel Snowball
                  and the gang







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • C.R.
                  That s so weird. I don t know where all those question marks came from in my post! Anyway, I also wanted to add that Misty has in the past six months gotten
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
                    That's so weird. I don't know where all those question marks came from in my post!

                    Anyway, I also wanted to add that Misty has in the past six months gotten some pain medication. The internist thought maybe it was pain that was making her heart rate go up. We gave her Buprenex injections for a while, but it didn't seem to do anything. Misty was still having the fast heart rate, and we didn't really see any change in her demeanor...how well she was moving or her laying positions (she lays in these uncomfy positions when she hurts somewhere), so the vet had us stop it, because it was making her constipated. After we started a supplement called Feline Pain Plus by Genesis Resources about two weeks ago, we noticed a significant change in Misty's demeanor, body language, her laying more comfy and walking around more, getting up and down from the bed easier...so if she did have pain, it was less. But...she still has the rapid heart rate, so we're figuring it's not from pain, the fast heart rate, so it has to be from something else. We just don't know what.

                    Carol and Angel Snowball
                    and the gang
                  • Westgold
                    Carol, at her age I wouldn t be feeding raw. There is too much danger in it, and she couldn t fight off any bacteria as easily as a younger cat. She should
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
                      Carol, at her age I wouldn't be feeding raw. There is too much danger in it, and she couldn't fight off any bacteria as easily as a younger cat. She should have relatively bland food, not too much fat, etc. Definitely no vegetables. My Pooh got sick when the vet changed his food to something more fatty at the age of 14 I think -- he developed horrible gas all inside and ended up in the hospital. Once they get up there in years, we have to be more careful. What is Misty's weight like?
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Carol
                      To: westgold@... ; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 5:48 PM
                      Subject: Re: [FH] Rapid heart rate cause?


                      Oh gosh, Michelle, that could really be something! About 4 months ago we started changing Misty's food over to Primal Raw chicken. She was eating Wellness canned chicken, but kept puking all the time, so we switched over to the raw. We did it slowly over the course of two weeks or so. I didn't really connect the fast heart rate with that, but you know... it could be. I know it was switching from chicken to chicken, canned to raw, but, the other ingredients are different... the veggies in the foods are different. I'm going to compare the two and see what the differences are.

                      Thanks so much! I don't know if that's the culprit, but it's surely worth investigating!

                      Carol and Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*
                      and the gang
                      http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/




                      -----Original Message-----

                      The only other thing I can think of is perhaps a reaction to some foods. I am sensitive to something in wheat (but NOT gluten) -- when I eat wheat after not having it for a while, my heart rate goes up considerably for about an hour. Have you changed her food recently?

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • C.R.
                      It really is individual for each kitty or dog as to what s best for them food-wise. We ve been feeding all our cats raw for years. It was only in the past few
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jan 25, 2011
                        It really is individual for each kitty or dog as to what's best for them food-wise. We've been feeding all our cats raw for years. It was only in the past few years that Misty and Snow started snubbing it, so we gave them both Wellness canned food. They never eat dry food. While on the Wellness canned food, and a few others we tried over the last year when they'd get all fussy and not want to eat, Misty's been much sicker. Her pancreatitis kept flaring up, she'd go through numerous bouts of diarrhea. Since on the raw food, she's not had any diarrhea and eats better and actually looks forward to eating, where before with any canned food she'd sniff the food and walk away and we'd have to sit there and almost hand feed her every bite. She doesn't do that with the raw food. She gobbles it down.

                        I know all about the cautions of raw food. I've been feeding raw to my various kitties and dogs on and off for over ten years. I consult with a vet who specializes in raw diets and make my own for Puddy and Punkie. Boo, Mama, Misty and Squeek get Primal frozen raw and so does my dog Chelsea. They all do very well on their raw food and all of our vets are behind us on it, so I'm good with giving them a raw diet. Every once and a while they'll go through their "I don't want this food" thing, and I'll try giving them canned food again just to get them to eat, but when they're all feeling healthy and good, they love their raw food, and they do seem healthier on it. But that's just how it is for my guys. I think everyone needs to find what works best for them.

                        Carol and Angel Snowball
                        and the gang







                        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Carol, at her age I wouldn't be feeding raw. There is too much danger in it, and she couldn't fight off any bacteria as easily as a younger cat.
                      • elfinmyst@aol.com
                        Hi Just a thought.. has Misty always had a fast heart rate? My kitten Topsy was investigated from 3 months of age for heart murmur and fast heart and
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jan 26, 2011
                          Hi

                          Just a thought.. has Misty always had a fast heart rate?

                          My kitten Topsy was investigated from 3 months of age for heart murmur and
                          fast heart and breathing. Even under sedation her breathing rate was 40.
                          She had mild valve problems causing the murmur and they found an infection in
                          her lungs which was treated with antibiotics.. pseudoplasma I think it was.

                          Her breathing rate is still 40. She has a fast rate and it seems to be just
                          her.. she's always had it.

                          The only other thing I can suggest is Toby collapsed with fast
                          breathing/heart on 3 occasions. We finally pinned it down to a type of handwash he was
                          allergic to. Changing it removed the problem completely.

                          Lyn

                          _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Carol
                          Hi Carol, As soon as I read the subject of your post I immediately went to get Mellie s file. If you recall, Mellie had a stroke 3 yrs ago just before her
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jan 26, 2011
                            Hi Carol,

                            As soon as I read the subject of your post I immediately went to get Mellie's file. If you recall, Mellie had a stroke 3 yrs ago just before her 16th birthday, we were fortunate to have her seen by a cardiologist 3 wks later. The day of the stroke the vet commented on hearing a heart murmur (her regular vet was not in so we took her to another clinic where she'd had acupuncture a couple times but we were very familiar with the vet as he treated her sister on a regular basis with acupuncture). Her bloodwork that day was fairly normal except her bun was 1 pt above normal, her creatinine was well within normal range at 1.7. The dx for her that day was first fainting, then changed to seizure disorder after she'd suffered 5 total events of collapsing that day.

                            We learned Mellie had a very fast heart rate in excess of 220 beats per minute. At that time she was found to have:
                            1. obstructive cardiomyopathy without hypertrophy - the obstructive component being that the "mitral valve was moving into the left ventricular outflow tract during contraction of the heart and creating a dynamic obstruction to ejection of blood to the body".
                            2. Dynamic right ventricular outflow tract obstruction.
                            3. Ventricular premature beats.
                            4. It was recommended she be seen by the neurologist asap to evaluate her condition.
                            5. Early renal failure - her creatinine had gone up to 2.6.

                            Mellie was put on atenolol to slow her heart rate, nothing was ever mentioned about the atenolol being dangerous to her kidneys. With her, the thinking was that her body was not getting proper blood supply because the rapid heart rate was causing the mitral valve to move over and block the outflow of blood. By slowing the heart rate this blockage ceased and her organs again received proper blood supply.

                            Mellie will be 19 on June 7! She's had no recurrence of collapsing, her problem now is spinal disk degeneration which causes her great difficulty in walking but she still gets around slowly. She sees the cardiologist and neurologist about every 6 months.

                            When we joined this group I recall being told that the heart always comes first. Granted, Melllie's creatinine is now around 3.5 so her crf is worsening slowly. But, without the atenolol I feel she would no longer be with us.

                            carol and mellie



                            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "C.R." <carolroar@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi everyone,
                            >
                            > We've been having a real problem trying to figure out why Misty's heart rate is so high all the time. It's always 180 to 200, and sometimes over 200. The vets, her regular vet, the holistic vet and the internist, can't find any physical reason why.
                            >
                            > She doesn't have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but does have a grade 3 murmur. She's had a heart ultrasound every six months for the past two years and they keep telling us there's nothing going on with her heart except the murmur.
                            >
                            > Her blood pressure is under control with taking her Amlodipine. Her kidney values are stable with her bun in the mid 40's and creatinine in the high 2's. Those have been around that for several months now. She's taking Tapazole (Methimazole) for her hyperthyroid and on her bloodwork two weeks ago she's still slightly hyperthyroid. The vet increased the Tapazole dose, and she's been on that for over a week now and still her heart rate is high. Last night while resting on the bed it was 184.
                            >
                            > So what's causing her heart rate to be so high?
                            >
                            > Even with the holistic vet doing acupuncture once a week, and Misty taking some Chinese herbs for her heart (also takes coQ10 and hawthorne), we can't get her heart rate to be more in the normal range.
                            >
                            > We're so afraid that this is going the same way as it did with her sister, Snowball. Snowball had an uncontrolled rapid heart rate for the last year of her life. Snowball had all the same problems as Misty, but also had HCM, and I'm really worried that all this fast heart pumping is going to wear out Misty's heart like with Snowball.
                            >
                            > The vets are hesitant to put Misty on any medication, like Atenolol, because of the side effects to her kidneys. So we're sitting here just doing nothing and worrying about the direction this is going...which isn't a good one.
                            >
                            > Any ideas on what can cause such a fast heart rate in the absence of HCM? And any ideas on what we can do for it would be really appreciated.
                            >
                            > Thanks,
                            > Carol and Angel Snowball
                            > and the gang
                            >
                          • acrocat@rocketmail.com
                            Hi Carol Your kitty has a complicated history but there are a few things to think about before you go any further investigating the tachycardia (rapid heart
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jan 30, 2011
                              Hi Carol

                              Your kitty has a complicated history but there are a few things to think
                              about before you go any further investigating the tachycardia (rapid
                              heart beat). First, though, I assume someone has done an ECG and it was
                              normal rhythm?

                              One thing is the hyperthyroidism. This causes tachycardia, and if her
                              hyperthyroidism is not yet controlled, I would work on that and ONLY
                              worry about the tachycardia if it still persists after her thyroid tests
                              in a normal range. (And just to cover all the bases, you are 100% sure
                              she is receiving each dose? No chance she's spitting it out, not eating
                              all her food at once, etc.?)

                              If it *does* persist, it's possible--but unlikely-- that her amlodipine
                              dose is too high. If the hypertension medication is too high, it can
                              cause low blood pressure instead. Low blood pressure makes the heart
                              work faster to compensate. I think this is the less likely possibility
                              -- your kitty has uncontrolled hyperthyroidism which is a textbook cause
                              of tachycardia.

                              --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "C.R." <carolroar@...> wrote:
                              >Last night while resting on the bed it was 184.

                              I just roused my sleeping cat to check, and his heart rate was 162 (he
                              has been screened for cardiac disease and is negative). As I held him,
                              it dropped into the 140s. Can you do a series of HR checks? Just get
                              her into your lap in a comfortable position in which you can feel her
                              heart beat constantly and see a clock. Keep your hand in position for
                              several minutes, and then take a HR, take another in 1 minute and a
                              final one after that.

                              > Even with the holistic vet doing acupuncture once a week, and Misty
                              taking some Chinese herbs for her heart (also takes coQ10 and
                              hawthorne), we can't get her heart rate to be more in the normal range.

                              Why is she taking herbs for her heart? I would stop the herbal
                              supplement to see if that helps. Herbs can act like drugs and one of
                              them may be increasing her heart rate. Again, I think the
                              hyperthyroidism is the first thing to rule out, though.

                              > The vets are hesitant to put Misty on any medication, like Atenolol,
                              because of the side effects to her kidneys.

                              I'm not sure what side effects you're referring to? It looks like Misty
                              has some mild chronic kidney disease (CKD), correct? I can't see the
                              issue with atenolol. It is excreted by the kidneys (as so many things
                              are!) and so should be titrated carefully in cats with serious renal
                              compromise. Really, it should be titrated carefully in every patient!
                              So I wouldn't take atenolol off the table for the future unless there is
                              further history not included in your post.

                              Hope this helps

                              Adriann
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