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Respiration rate and purring

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  • Jim Sinclair
    This evening, shortly after giving Clipsy her evening dose of Lasix, I brought her into my room and set her down on the bed. After a few minutes she climbed
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 15, 2011
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      This evening, shortly after giving Clipsy her evening dose of Lasix, I
      brought her into my room and set her down on the bed. After a few
      minutes she climbed onto my lap and began purring loudly. I noticed
      that her breathing seemed very fast. I timed it, then timed it again,
      and again. She was breathing 48-50 times a minute. The breathing
      wasn't labored and she was lying in a relaxed position, purring the
      whole time. I wasn't sure what to do. Last week the cardiologist said
      if her breathing was faster than 40 per minute, I should give her
      another dose of Lasix. But she'd just had a dose. I just kept watch on
      her breathing and her posture and manner.

      After some time she stopped purring. Then I timed her breathing again,
      and it was 24.

      Does purring make respiration speed up? Is this a problem? It would be
      pretty sad if I had to discourage her from purring!

      Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
      www.jimsinclair.org
      http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
    • LorieAHuston@cs.com
      I think a respiratory rate measured while Clipsy is not purring is likely to be more accurate than one taken while she is purring loudly. ... From: Jim
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 15, 2011
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        I think a respiratory rate measured while Clipsy is not purring is likely to be more accurate than one taken while she is purring loudly.








        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
        To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sat, Jan 15, 2011 9:28 pm
        Subject: [FH] Respiration rate and purring





        This evening, shortly after giving Clipsy her evening dose of Lasix, I
        brought her into my room and set her down on the bed. After a few
        minutes she climbed onto my lap and began purring loudly. I noticed
        that her breathing seemed very fast. I timed it, then timed it again,
        and again. She was breathing 48-50 times a minute. The breathing
        wasn't labored and she was lying in a relaxed position, purring the
        whole time. I wasn't sure what to do. Last week the cardiologist said
        if her breathing was faster than 40 per minute, I should give her
        another dose of Lasix. But she'd just had a dose. I just kept watch on
        her breathing and her posture and manner.

        After some time she stopped purring. Then I timed her breathing again,
        and it was 24.

        Does purring make respiration speed up? Is this a problem? It would be
        pretty sad if I had to discourage her from purring!

        Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
        www.jimsinclair.org
        http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • C.R.
        hi Jim, I ve read that cats also do purr when they re sick, amongst other reasongs, to help the body heal, to make themselves feel better. I read an article
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 15, 2011
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          hi Jim,

          I've read that cats also do purr when they're sick, amongst other reasongs, to help the body heal, to make themselves feel better. I read an article several years ago that said that cats purring can also help regulate their heart function. I don't know how true that is or not, because so many kitties have heart disease, but it's a nice, calming thought that their purring when they're sick can be a positive thing.

          I do think that when they purr they're heart and respiration may go up some, because when they're purring they're using some energy to do it...kind of like doing a little exercise. I've noticed that when I take Misty's heart rate, it's always faster when she's purring than when she's resting and not purring.

          I think any purring, whether during healthy or sick times, has to be a good thing, and I wouldn't discourage it at all. If you think Clipsy is in distress or restless or just not feeling calm, there are a couple of things that I do that you might try. One is I give all my guys a flower essence called Rescue Remedy. It's made by Bach Flower Essences. They do make an alcohol free one now for pets, but if you can't find that one, the regular one is okay if you dilute it. You can put a few drops into the mouth or rub it into the skin. The inner hairless part of the tip of the ear, on the belly, or the best spot I like is the very top of the head between they're ears. That is the "focus" or "calming" point in Chinese medicine. When I can't give the RR orally, I rub it into that spot, right on the base of the fur so it makes contact with the skin. And the second thing I do is just that...massaging that calming point. You do little, tiny circles...lightly, not a lot of pressure. I do this all the time with Misty (with or without the rescue remedy) when we're at the vet's office or when we have to give her fluid (Misty also had kidney disease), and it always seems to help calm her down.

          If you use Rescue Remedy or any other flower essence, the best way is to put 4 -5 drops of the remedy in a separate glass 1 ounce dropper bottle with spring water only, and dose it from that. You put the drops and water in the bottle and then shake the bottle on the palm of your hand (this is called sucussing) 100 times the first time you make the remedy. After that each time you want to dose, if it's been a while, you only sucuss it about 20 times. The sucussing "activates" the energy of the flower essence. Then you can give a few drops by mouth or on the skin. You can even put it in a spray bottle and spray the area they lay on. If you give it by mouth, just rinse the end of the dropper in very hot water, shake it dry before putting it back in the bottle.

          Here are two sites that have lots of info abo t flower essences.
          http://www.bachflower.com/ and http://www.fesflowers.com/

          I hope Clipsy has a restful night.

          hugs,

          Carol and Angel Snowball
          and the gang
        • Mmayer11
          I think it s important to mention that purring in cats is not always due to pleasure. Cats have been seen to purr after being hit by a car for example...I have
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 15, 2011
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            I think it's important to mention that purring in cats is not always due to pleasure. Cats have been seen to purr after being hit by a car for example...I have read that this may indicate that the purr in cats can be due to many things both negative as well as positive and may be in some cases a natural mechanism to calm stress.



            Marianna




            -----Original Message-----
            From: LorieAHuston <LorieAHuston@...>
            To: jisincla <jisincla@...>; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sat, Jan 15, 2011 9:42 pm
            Subject: Re: [FH] Respiration rate and purring






            I think a respiratory rate measured while Clipsy is not purring is likely to be more accurate than one taken while she is purring loudly.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
            To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sat, Jan 15, 2011 9:28 pm
            Subject: [FH] Respiration rate and purring

            This evening, shortly after giving Clipsy her evening dose of Lasix, I
            brought her into my room and set her down on the bed. After a few
            minutes she climbed onto my lap and began purring loudly. I noticed
            that her breathing seemed very fast. I timed it, then timed it again,
            and again. She was breathing 48-50 times a minute. The breathing
            wasn't labored and she was lying in a relaxed position, purring the
            whole time. I wasn't sure what to do. Last week the cardiologist said
            if her breathing was faster than 40 per minute, I should give her
            another dose of Lasix. But she'd just had a dose. I just kept watch on
            her breathing and her posture and manner.

            After some time she stopped purring. Then I timed her breathing again,
            and it was 24.

            Does purring make respiration speed up? Is this a problem? It would be
            pretty sad if I had to discourage her from purring!

            Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
            www.jimsinclair.org
            http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jim Sinclair
            ... Yes, I ve read that too. That s why I was also looking at her posture and her manner. She was acting the way she normally does when she s in cuddle mode.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 15, 2011
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              On Sun, Jan 16, 2011 at 12:20 AM, Mmayer11 <mmayer11@...> wrote:
              >
              > I think it's important to mention that purring in cats is not always due to pleasure. Cats have been seen to purr after being hit by a car for example

              Yes, I've read that too. That's why I was also looking at her posture
              and her manner. She was acting the way she normally does when she's in
              cuddle mode. If she'd seemed uncomfortable or if her breathing had
              seemed labored or wheezy or raspy, I wouldn't have posted to the list,
              I'd have called the emergency clinic. The confusing thing was that she
              was acting just fine, except that her breathing was so fast.

              Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
              www.jimsinclair.org
              http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
            • Mmayer11
              Jim, How long did the episode you noted last? If you mentioned it, I missed it. Marianna ... From: Jim Sinclair To: Mmayer11
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 17, 2011
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                Jim,
                How long did the episode you noted last? If you mentioned it, I missed it.





                Marianna




                -----Original Message-----
                From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
                To: Mmayer11 <mmayer11@...>
                Cc: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sun, Jan 16, 2011 12:31 am
                Subject: Re: [FH] Respiration rate and purring


                On Sun, Jan 16, 2011 at 12:20 AM, Mmayer11 <mmayer11@...> wrote:
                >
                > I think it's important to mention that purring in cats is not always due to
                pleasure. Cats have been seen to purr after being hit by a car for example

                Yes, I've read that too. That's why I was also looking at her posture
                and her manner. She was acting the way she normally does when she's in
                cuddle mode. If she'd seemed uncomfortable or if her breathing had
                seemed labored or wheezy or raspy, I wouldn't have posted to the list,
                I'd have called the emergency clinic. The confusing thing was that she
                was acting just fine, except that her breathing was so fast.

                Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
                www.jimsinclair.org
                http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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