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Re: Introducing Clipsy: 9 year old DSH with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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  • kellikitti
    Welcome Jim and Clipsy! Wow, you and Clipsy have definitely been through a lot together! :) I know you will get some good advice from some of the other list
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 8, 2011
      Welcome Jim and Clipsy!

      Wow, you and Clipsy have definitely been through a lot together! :)

      I know you will get some good advice from some of the other list members, but I wanted to encourage you that if it seems like she is being herself since coming home from the hospital, that's definitely a good sign.

      From your description it sounds like you are really in tune to her as well, both eating, and breathing. That is something that will serve you really well, because as someone with her all the time, you know better than anyone what her signals are.

      :) Laurel and Cleo

      > Since coming home from the hospital she's been eating, drinking,
      > grooming herself, and purring. She's not very active but she seems
      > content. She spends most of her time lying around (as do most of my
      > other cats, except for the 9-month-old kitten), but when it's time to
      > eat or she needs to use the litterbox. she doesn't appear to have any
      > difficulty getting herself where she wants to be.
      >
      > The vet at the local emergency clinic said her survival will be a
      > matter of days, weeks at most. The cardiologist at Cornell said she
      > might live for months. What do I need to know and do for Clipsy? What
      > should I expect?
      >
      > Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
      > www.jimsinclair.org
      > http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
      >
    • Judi Levens
      Hi Jim; welcome to the group but we re sorry you had to join! I just wanted to say that many of us have learned to ignore the prognosis for length of life
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 9, 2011
        Hi Jim; welcome to the group but we're sorry you had to join! I just wanted to say that many of us have learned to ignore the prognosis for length of life with heart kitties; mine was given 3-6 months over 3 years ago, so you just never know (and many other people here have had similar experiences.) Just treat her like the special girl she obviously is to you...treasure what time you do have together and maybe she'll recover from the meds to the point she can hang in there for a longer time. Many of us also give supplements; some use CardioStrength from vetriscience, many of us give CQ10 and taurine, and some of us give nattokinasse to help prevent clots from forming. It is important to monitor the breathing of a cat who has had CHF...when you notice labored breathing or rapid breathing it's time to go to the vet or even emergency room as you could be seeing fluid build up in the lungs. A sleeping cat should have 20-30 breaths per minute. Good luck with Clipsy...I hope you have lots of loving time together...Judi and Max








        To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        From: jisincla@...
        Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2011 21:11:20 -0500
        Subject: [FH] Introducing Clipsy: 9 year old DSH with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy






        Hello, I've just joined this group because of my cat, Clipsy. Clipsy
        was born in June 2001. I've had her since she was about ten weeks old.
        She's spayed, up to date on vaccinations, FeLV/FIV negative, and a
        strictly indoor cat.

        She has had a few bouts of inappetence leading to two severe episodes
        of hepatic lipidosis in her life. I also have one of her littermates,
        and he has had this happen too, as has their mother, who lives with my
        mother. None of my other cats has ever had this, and my mother's vet
        thinks it's a genetic problem in these particular cats. I prevent
        recurrences of it by monitoring whether they eat, and if a cat skips
        more than two meals in a row, I start syringe feeding.

        Clipsy was diagnosed with high blood pressure and my vet initially
        prescribed amlodipine, but Clipsy stopped eating when taking it. Then
        the vet prescribed benazepril instead. This seemed to help, as at her
        last checkup in October 2010, her blood pressure was good. In May 2010
        she had a normal T4 test and a cardiac ultrasound showing no
        enlargement or thickening anywhere.

        Clipsy had been having violent fits of sneezing, with some yellow
        discharge, and had lost her voice and was "meowing" silently with only
        a laryngitic whispery sound. Several of my other cats were also
        showing respiratory symptoms. All the cats were started on a four-week
        course of doxycycline on December 17. Clipsy seemed to respond very
        well to this. She sneezed a lot less, and when she did sneeze, it was
        just one ordinary sneeze, not a whole string of violent quacking
        sneezes. She got her voice back and was meowing normally again.

        This past Wednesday evening Clipsy was lying curled up next to me
        while I was reading and writing email, and at some point I noticed
        that her breathing sounded strange. At first I thought she might be
        having a dream. I nudged her and she did not wake up. The strange
        breathing continued. I shook her. Still no change. Her eyes were wide
        open and staring and not responsive. She was gasping open-mouthed.
        This went on for several minutes, with me shaking her and calling her
        name and dialing my vet's office (which was just closing), and then
        she arched backward and seemed not to be breathing at all. I did chest
        compressions and she resumed the open-mouthed gasping.

        I wrapped her in a towel and rushed her to the local emergency clinic,
        driving with one hand and jiggling her on my lap with the other to
        keep her breathing. At some point her bowel let loose.

        When we arrived at the hospital she was conscious and no longer
        gasping, but still breathing very fast. My lap and my hand were
        covered with cat poop. The staff started working on her while I went
        into the restroom and tried to clean up.

        By the time I'd wiped off my pants as best I could and washed my
        hands, the vet had determined that Clipsy was having congestive heart
        failure. She sent us to Cornell University to be admitted through
        their emergency service.

        Clipsy was stabilized with a diuretic and oxygen overnight and was
        examined by a cardiologist Thursday morning. She was found to have
        severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She came home Thursday afternoon
        with prescriptions for Lasix twice a day and 1/2 a low-dose aspirin
        every third day, along with continuing her established dose of
        benazepril. She has a follow-up appointment with her local vet on
        Thursday, at which time she's supposed to have her kidney function
        checked.

        Since coming home from the hospital she's been eating, drinking,
        grooming herself, and purring. She's not very active but she seems
        content. She spends most of her time lying around (as do most of my
        other cats, except for the 9-month-old kitten), but when it's time to
        eat or she needs to use the litterbox. she doesn't appear to have any
        difficulty getting herself where she wants to be.

        The vet at the local emergency clinic said her survival will be a
        matter of days, weeks at most. The cardiologist at Cornell said she
        might live for months. What do I need to know and do for Clipsy? What
        should I expect?

        Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
        www.jimsinclair.org
        http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • LorieAHuston@cs.com
        Hi Jim. I m so sorry to hear about Clipsy and her diagnosis of HCM. I know it s a frightening condition. In regards to how long she has left, the best any of
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 9, 2011
          Hi Jim.

          I'm so sorry to hear about Clipsy and her diagnosis of HCM. I know it's a frightening condition.

          In regards to how long she has left, the best any of us can do is guess about that. My advice to you is not to dwell on that aspect. Some cats with this condition survive weeks or months. Others survive for years. Realize that Clipsy has a serious disease, that her remaining time with you may be short and try to make every moment of the time she has left special for both of you. Spend extra time her and don't be afraid to spoil her.

          Lorie Huston, DVM
          www.pet-health-care-gazette.com
          lorieahuston@...
          loriehuston@...





          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
          To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sat, Jan 8, 2011 9:11 pm
          Subject: [FH] Introducing Clipsy: 9 year old DSH with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy




          Hello, I've just joined this group because of my cat, Clipsy. Clipsy
          was born in June 2001. I've had her since she was about ten weeks old.
          She's spayed, up to date on vaccinations, FeLV/FIV negative, and a
          strictly indoor cat.

          She has had a few bouts of inappetence leading to two severe episodes
          of hepatic lipidosis in her life. I also have one of her littermates,
          and he has had this happen too, as has their mother, who lives with my
          mother. None of my other cats has ever had this, and my mother's vet
          thinks it's a genetic problem in these particular cats. I prevent
          recurrences of it by monitoring whether they eat, and if a cat skips
          more than two meals in a row, I start syringe feeding.

          Clipsy was diagnosed with high blood pressure and my vet initially
          prescribed amlodipine, but Clipsy stopped eating when taking it. Then
          the vet prescribed benazepril instead. This seemed to help, as at her
          last checkup in October 2010, her blood pressure was good. In May 2010
          she had a normal T4 test and a cardiac ultrasound showing no
          enlargement or thickening anywhere.

          Clipsy had been having violent fits of sneezing, with some yellow
          discharge, and had lost her voice and was "meowing" silently with only
          a laryngitic whispery sound. Several of my other cats were also
          showing respiratory symptoms. All the cats were started on a four-week
          course of doxycycline on December 17. Clipsy seemed to respond very
          well to this. She sneezed a lot less, and when she did sneeze, it was
          just one ordinary sneeze, not a whole string of violent quacking
          sneezes. She got her voice back and was meowing normally again.

          This past Wednesday evening Clipsy was lying curled up next to me
          while I was reading and writing email, and at some point I noticed
          that her breathing sounded strange. At first I thought she might be
          having a dream. I nudged her and she did not wake up. The strange
          breathing continued. I shook her. Still no change. Her eyes were wide
          open and staring and not responsive. She was gasping open-mouthed.
          This went on for several minutes, with me shaking her and calling her
          name and dialing my vet's office (which was just closing), and then
          she arched backward and seemed not to be breathing at all. I did chest
          compressions and she resumed the open-mouthed gasping.

          I wrapped her in a towel and rushed her to the local emergency clinic,
          driving with one hand and jiggling her on my lap with the other to
          keep her breathing. At some point her bowel let loose.

          When we arrived at the hospital she was conscious and no longer
          gasping, but still breathing very fast. My lap and my hand were
          covered with cat poop. The staff started working on her while I went
          into the restroom and tried to clean up.

          By the time I'd wiped off my pants as best I could and washed my
          hands, the vet had determined that Clipsy was having congestive heart
          failure. She sent us to Cornell University to be admitted through
          their emergency service.

          Clipsy was stabilized with a diuretic and oxygen overnight and was
          examined by a cardiologist Thursday morning. She was found to have
          severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She came home Thursday afternoon
          with prescriptions for Lasix twice a day and 1/2 a low-dose aspirin
          every third day, along with continuing her established dose of
          benazepril. She has a follow-up appointment with her local vet on
          Thursday, at which time she's supposed to have her kidney function
          checked.

          Since coming home from the hospital she's been eating, drinking,
          grooming herself, and purring. She's not very active but she seems
          content. She spends most of her time lying around (as do most of my
          other cats, except for the 9-month-old kitten), but when it's time to
          eat or she needs to use the litterbox. she doesn't appear to have any
          difficulty getting herself where she wants to be.

          The vet at the local emergency clinic said her survival will be a
          matter of days, weeks at most. The cardiologist at Cornell said she
          might live for months. What do I need to know and do for Clipsy? What
          should I expect?

          Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
          www.jimsinclair.org
          http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com








          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jim Sinclair
          ... Just a quick update, because nothing tremendously exciting is happening, just day to day care and feeding: It s been three months plus a couple of days
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 7, 2011
            On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 9:11 PM, I introduced myself and Clipsy:

            > The vet at the local emergency clinic said her survival will be a
            > matter of days, weeks at most. The cardiologist at Cornell said she
            > might live for months. What do I need to know and do for Clipsy? What
            > should I expect?

            Just a quick update, because nothing tremendously exciting is
            happening, just day to day care and feeding: It's been three months
            plus a couple of days since January 5 when Clipsy got her diagnosis
            and the vet at the emergency clinic predicted her imminent demise.
            Clipsy is at this moment curled up on my lap, purring. She still takes
            benazepril once a day and furosemide twice a day, as well as daily
            supplements of CoQ10, nattokinase, and L-carnitine. Her appetite is
            good, her breathing seems fine, her gums and paw pads are a healthy
            shade of pink, and her fur is clean and shiny so she's keeping herself
            nicely groomed. As a friend of mine commented, for a dead cat she
            looks pretty darn good!

            I got back the other day from two weeks of travel (earning
            desperately-needed money to pay vet bills), during which Clipsy and
            her brother Willow (who has pancreatitis and/or IBD and/or triaditis),
            plus my Siamese cat Astrophe who doesn't need special care but is very
            close to Willow so I didn't want to separate them, stayed with trusted
            friends who are experienced at caring for senior cats with chronic
            illnesses. I was concerned about subjecting them to the stress of
            travel to the friends' house (first about 420 miles to my mother's
            house where my other three cats and my dogs stayed, then a little over
            200 miles back to my friends' house which is about halfway between
            where I live and where my mother lives) and of being left with people
            they don't know very well. I worried that one or both of them might
            have some kind of health crisis triggered by the stress, or in
            Clipsy's case just by the progression of her disease. I was afraid one
            or both of them might die while I was far away and unable to be there
            with them. But my friends sent email reports saying they were doing
            fine, Clipsy rarely stopped purring, and Willow was being renamed
            Hoover because of the way he was eating. The biggest problem they had
            was with Astrophe, the "healthy" cat, who kept doing Siamese-cat
            howling at night.

            So now I'm back at my friends' house, and this afternoon I need to
            pack everybody up and drive another 200+ miles to my mother's house to
            be reunited with the rest of the furry family. Based on past travel
            experience, I expect I'll be driving a lot of those miles with Clipsy
            on my lap. :-)

            Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
            www.jimsinclair.org
            http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
          • Melissa Legan
            Jim,   My Winston, a Ragdoll, was diagnosed at 5 months old with HOCM and at 8 months went into CHF. He went 15 months in CHF, during which he had a bout of
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 7, 2011
              Jim,
               
              My Winston, a Ragdoll, was diagnosed at 5 months old with HOCM and at 8 months went into CHF. He went 15 months in CHF, during which he had a bout of metabolic alkalosis and most recently, Chylothorax. When he was originally diagnosed they said dont expect him to live a year, when he went into CHF, they said dont expect to live more than 3 months in CHF.
               
              Well, I know why they say this, they dont want to give false hope and are only following the guidelines in recent studies. Winston turned two years old two weeks ago! We had him re-xrayed about a month ago, only to find out that he is no longer in heart failure. While he still has chylous effusion around the lungs, it is pocketed and diffuse, thus possibly enabling him to go on indefinatley with it there. So, on his birthday we delivered a cake to the vets office and the vet had tears in her eyes and told me how absolutley remarkable his case is. To go 15 months in CHF, and then suddenly, have a breakthrough. Chylous Effusion is denfinately not good, but his case seems to be pretty rare. Usually the effusion keeps coming back, and they have to be tapped all the time. Winston never had any additional fluid accumulation other than what was intiailly found. About 30-60 ccs. Its sterile fluid, and because of the way it is positioned, it doesnt effect
              Winston's breathing. My vets have never seen a rebound from the light at the end of the tunnel like this.
               
              I'll tell you..........the special bond we share with these kitties DOES have something to do with their positivity.
               
              Winston wants to live.....and he and I share something so special. I know what he is feeling, and he understands how I am feeling. One day I was on the couch, and my eyes welled up with tears, I didnt want to lose the little guy.....he reached up with his paw, and put it on my cheek, as if to say "Mommy dont cry, Everything will be okay." They are smart yet sensitive animals.....and they want to live.
               
              I am so glad to hear the Clipsy is doing well......just keep doing what your doing :)
               
              Melissa, Winston and Big Brother Oliver.

              --- On Thu, 4/7/11, Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...> wrote:


              From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
              Subject: [FH] Re: Introducing Clipsy: 9 year old DSH with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
              To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, April 7, 2011, 9:21 AM


               



              On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 9:11 PM, I introduced myself and Clipsy:

              > The vet at the local emergency clinic said her survival will be a
              > matter of days, weeks at most. The cardiologist at Cornell said she
              > might live for months. What do I need to know and do for Clipsy? What
              > should I expect?

              Just a quick update, because nothing tremendously exciting is
              happening, just day to day care and feeding: It's been three months
              plus a couple of days since January 5 when Clipsy got her diagnosis
              and the vet at the emergency clinic predicted her imminent demise.
              Clipsy is at this moment curled up on my lap, purring. She still takes
              benazepril once a day and furosemide twice a day, as well as daily
              supplements of CoQ10, nattokinase, and L-carnitine. Her appetite is
              good, her breathing seems fine, her gums and paw pads are a healthy
              shade of pink, and her fur is clean and shiny so she's keeping herself
              nicely groomed. As a friend of mine commented, for a dead cat she
              looks pretty darn good!

              I got back the other day from two weeks of travel (earning
              desperately-needed money to pay vet bills), during which Clipsy and
              her brother Willow (who has pancreatitis and/or IBD and/or triaditis),
              plus my Siamese cat Astrophe who doesn't need special care but is very
              close to Willow so I didn't want to separate them, stayed with trusted
              friends who are experienced at caring for senior cats with chronic
              illnesses. I was concerned about subjecting them to the stress of
              travel to the friends' house (first about 420 miles to my mother's
              house where my other three cats and my dogs stayed, then a little over
              200 miles back to my friends' house which is about halfway between
              where I live and where my mother lives) and of being left with people
              they don't know very well. I worried that one or both of them might
              have some kind of health crisis triggered by the stress, or in
              Clipsy's case just by the progression of her disease. I was afraid one
              or both of them might die while I was far away and unable to be there
              with them. But my friends sent email reports saying they were doing
              fine, Clipsy rarely stopped purring, and Willow was being renamed
              Hoover because of the way he was eating. The biggest problem they had
              was with Astrophe, the "healthy" cat, who kept doing Siamese-cat
              howling at night.

              So now I'm back at my friends' house, and this afternoon I need to
              pack everybody up and drive another 200+ miles to my mother's house to
              be reunited with the rest of the furry family. Based on past travel
              experience, I expect I'll be driving a lot of those miles with Clipsy
              on my lap. :-)

              Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
              www.jimsinclair.org
              http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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