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Do cats faint?

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  • Liz
    We re in uncharted territory here...Brandy is a 15-year-old saddle thrombus survivor (the first survivor ever for our vets practice). He threw the clot on
    Message 1 of 13 , May 30 8:05 AM
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      We're in uncharted territory here...Brandy is a 15-year-old saddle thrombus survivor (the first survivor ever for our vets' practice). He threw the clot on April 8, so he's almost two months post-clot now.

      Brandy has had a couple of episodes lately, one last Tuesday and one this morning, where he seemed to pass out very briefly. In one case he was in a standing position and actually fell off the side of the bed; in the other, he was sitting and just fell uninhibited onto his side on the bed. In both cases, he walked up to me just before it happened and stared deeply into my eyes which was a little unsettling. If he's actually "out", it's only for a moment. When he fell off the bed, he wasn't able to catch himself by the time he hit the floor but righted himself within a few seconds. He seems to recover fully physically in a few minutes' time, although he's quiet for the next few hours.

      Brandy is on a number of drugs because he also has CRF and a lung mass. His heart/circulatory system meds include diltiazem, enalapril and Plavix. He just saw the vet Thursday for his regular checkup and had full labs run - all was within normal limits, even the kidney values which have improved since the April clot. His blood pressure is also normal (was elevated before the clot) and his lung X-ray indicated little growth of the mass.

      I was willing to write the first episode off as momentary lack of coordination but now that we've had a second one, I suspect something else is going on. My husband and I are wondering if he's having mini-strokes even though he's on the Plavix to try to prevent clotting.

      Does anyone have any thoughts as to what might be going on?

      Many thanks!

      Liz and Brandy
    • Mmayer11
      Liz, I am so sorry to read this is what Brandy and you are dealing with now. I faced what you describe with my 9 year old. I rushed him to a cardio. It was
      Message 2 of 13 , May 30 8:36 AM
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        Liz,
        I am so sorry to read this is what Brandy and you are dealing with now. I faced what you describe with my 9 year old. I rushed him to a cardio. It was very serious...heart-related severity. Since your Brandy is on heart meds, I think you had better talk with your specialist asap. Fainting for cats is never anything but serious.
        HTH



        Marianna








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Judi Levens
        I have no experience with this, but I have read about people here saying their cat had syncope I believe it was which was like a fainting episode (maybe you
        Message 3 of 13 , May 30 10:51 AM
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          I have no experience with this, but I have read about people here saying their cat had "syncope" I believe it was which was like a fainting episode (maybe you can google it and find out more) but I don't know anything about the severity. I have had the experience where once in a while Max stares deeply into my eyes also, and I don't know what that is about, but his is not related to anything special that I have observed. Good luck with this, I hope it's not too serious, but maybe even a phone call to the emergency vet would give you some info to go on...Judi and Max








          To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          From: chuckliz@...
          Date: Sun, 30 May 2010 15:05:04 +0000
          Subject: [FH] Do cats faint?





          We're in uncharted territory here...Brandy is a 15-year-old saddle thrombus survivor (the first survivor ever for our vets' practice). He threw the clot on April 8, so he's almost two months post-clot now.

          Brandy has had a couple of episodes lately, one last Tuesday and one this morning, where he seemed to pass out very briefly. In one case he was in a standing position and actually fell off the side of the bed; in the other, he was sitting and just fell uninhibited onto his side on the bed. In both cases, he walked up to me just before it happened and stared deeply into my eyes which was a little unsettling. If he's actually "out", it's only for a moment. When he fell off the bed, he wasn't able to catch himself by the time he hit the floor but righted himself within a few seconds. He seems to recover fully physically in a few minutes' time, although he's quiet for the next few hours.

          Brandy is on a number of drugs because he also has CRF and a lung mass. His heart/circulatory system meds include diltiazem, enalapril and Plavix. He just saw the vet Thursday for his regular checkup and had full labs run - all was within normal limits, even the kidney values which have improved since the April clot. His blood pressure is also normal (was elevated before the clot) and his lung X-ray indicated little growth of the mass.

          I was willing to write the first episode off as momentary lack of coordination but now that we've had a second one, I suspect something else is going on. My husband and I are wondering if he's having mini-strokes even though he's on the Plavix to try to prevent clotting.

          Does anyone have any thoughts as to what might be going on?

          Many thanks!

          Liz and Brandy






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • elfinmyst@aol.com
          Hi Liz WHat you are describing could be several things from mini fits to mini strokes. The fact he recovers so quickly I would suspect a type of feline
          Message 4 of 13 , May 31 2:06 AM
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            Hi Liz

            WHat you are describing could be several things from mini fits to mini
            strokes. The fact he recovers so quickly I would suspect a type of feline
            epilepsy perhaps? Also low potassium can have this effect too.

            Since he recovers immediately I wouldn't have thought bloood clots were
            to blame, as you know the effects are dramatic. My Josh had a fit 3 months
            ago and it was dramatic and jerking limbs and terrified me.. he has not had
            one since and there was no known cause, so maybe heart meds can cause fits?

            Either way, I suggest a trip to the vets. If they are regular, try and
            video one to show the vet or write down exactly what happens.

            Lyn:)

            _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • cococy45
            Liz, I m not sure I can help but will relate what happened with our Mellie two years ago...and since it has been two years I m hoping I can remember the
            Message 5 of 13 , May 31 11:46 AM
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              Liz, I'm not sure I can help but will relate what happened with our Mellie two years ago...and since it has been two years I'm hoping I can remember the details. You might do a search for Mellie as I believe I joined the group shortly after her events which were early May, 2008.

              We had been away from home for about 3 hrs and within minutes of our coming in I heard her crying, that mournful cry as if she were about to upchuck. I was at the kitchen sink so grabbed paper towels and went to her - she was about 8 ft away. When I got to where I could see her, she was turning in a circle, salivating, opening/closing her mouth (I told the vet she was "chomping") not licking as they do when about to upchuck, and she slowly sank to the floor. I had my hands on either side of her as I didn't want her to really fall over and hurt herself. She was breathing very rapidly too. I first called her regular vet (Dr. G) but quickly remembered he doesn't work Tuesdays and none of the other vets had seen her there. Then I called the clinic where her sister went for acupuncture and they'd seen Mellie a couple times for acupuncture for arthritis, we had her there within 10 minutes and she was seen immediately.

              Dr. D listened to her chest as she sounded very congested and he did a chest xray and bloodwork. He heard a grade 3 heart murmur which had never been mentioned to me prior. He made us stay until the bloodwork was done, it came back pretty much unremarkable as the only thing even slightly off was BUN at one point above normal. Creatinine was 1.7 which was well within normal range. He gave her an injection of a small amount of chlorpromazine for the suspected nausea. His diagnosis was that she had fainted, he advised we take her to a local clinic for heart echo due to the murmur, we got an appt for Thursday for the echo.

              When we got her home I opened the carrier but did not take her out, I waited for her to get out on her own, this took almost 10 minutes. We noticed she had her eyes closed or barely open, squinting. Just a few minutes later she cried, went in a circle, and collapsed down again. That was about 5:30. She did it again at 7:30p. Dr. D called at 8p to see how she was, when I told him of the additional episodes he said she was having seizures and to take her to the ER if it happened again. At 9p it did happen again, we took her to ER where they hooked her up to IV and kept her overnight. I called to check on her at 11p, she had just had another episode with the vet watching - vet did not know whether it was syncope of seizure, gave valium IV. We picked her up the next morning to transport her to Dr. D for observation.

              She has never had another episode. We kept the appt with local vet for heart echo - he dx her as having advanced HCM, nothing to be done for her, both Dr. G and Dr. D advised putting her down. No way. Three weeks later we were able to get appt with cardiologist almost 3 hrs away. He dx her having very rapid heart rate of 220+, which caused the mitral valve flap to pull down/over thus partially blocking the outflow of blood from heart to the body. Body organs were not getting adequate blood supply. Atenolol was prescribed to slow the heart rate. She was still having great difficulty walking and advised she be checked by the neuro dept. Bloodwork was done, her creatinine had risen to 2.6.

              A month later she was seen by neuro who advised she had left forebrain injury caused by either stroke, tumor, birth defect unmasked by lack of blood and only time would tell. We chose to not have an MRI done as we felt surgery was not an option at her age. The recheck two months later found her improved by 70% and it was at this point that neuro advised he felt she had suffered a stroke or brain bleed which had resolved slowly. She was almost completely back to normal.

              After the day of episodes we changed to a cats only clinic as she needed to be as stressfree as possible. She had a checkup and bloodwork Friday. Her creatinine has continued to rise, is now 3.9. A few weeks after the episodes I talked with her long-time vet, Dr. G, to ask if he'd noticed rapid heart rate or murmur. Yes, he had, but he'd thought they were related to stress of being in the clinic. I bought a stethoscope and learned her heart rate at home was 220.

              Vets should let us know everything they find so that we can follow-up at home to be sure such things are or are not stress related.

              I've tried to remember everything. Hope your kitty does well. Sure must be a fighter to have recovered from the clots - fantastic!!!

              carol and mellie



              --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Liz" <chuckliz@...> wrote:
              >
              > We're in uncharted territory here...Brandy is a 15-year-old saddle thrombus survivor (the first survivor ever for our vets' practice). He threw the clot on April 8, so he's almost two months post-clot now.
              >
              > Brandy has had a couple of episodes lately, one last Tuesday and one this morning, where he seemed to pass out very briefly. In one case he was in a standing position and actually fell off the side of the bed; in the other, he was sitting and just fell uninhibited onto his side on the bed. In both cases, he walked up to me just before it happened and stared deeply into my eyes which was a little unsettling. If he's actually "out", it's only for a moment. When he fell off the bed, he wasn't able to catch himself by the time he hit the floor but righted himself within a few seconds. He seems to recover fully physically in a few minutes' time, although he's quiet for the next few hours.
              >
              > Brandy is on a number of drugs because he also has CRF and a lung mass. His heart/circulatory system meds include diltiazem, enalapril and Plavix. He just saw the vet Thursday for his regular checkup and had full labs run - all was within normal limits, even the kidney values which have improved since the April clot. His blood pressure is also normal (was elevated before the clot) and his lung X-ray indicated little growth of the mass.
              >
              > I was willing to write the first episode off as momentary lack of coordination but now that we've had a second one, I suspect something else is going on. My husband and I are wondering if he's having mini-strokes even though he's on the Plavix to try to prevent clotting.
              >
              > Does anyone have any thoughts as to what might be going on?
              >
              > Many thanks!
              >
              > Liz and Brandy
              >
            • Westgold
              hi -- my soul-kitty Pooh had several big horrible seizures a few years ago, and it turned out he had a brain tumor. There was nothing that could be done. But
              Message 6 of 13 , May 31 11:50 AM
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                hi -- my soul-kitty Pooh had several big horrible seizures a few years ago, and it turned out he had a brain tumor. There was nothing that could be done. But they put him on phenobarb to prevent him from having any more big seizures. But he had a little one every few days. He wouldn't fall over, but he would suddenly stand perfectly still and his eyes would get weird. As soon as I touched him or called his name he would snap out of it. Perhaps if he had one when I wasn't there to bring him out of it so quickly he would have fallen over. I don't know. But it sounds like you have a few different possibilities to talk to your vet about...
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: elfinmyst@...
                To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, May 31, 2010 5:06 AM
                Subject: [FH] Re:Do cats faint?



                Hi Liz

                WHat you are describing could be several things from mini fits to mini
                strokes. The fact he recovers so quickly I would suspect a type of feline
                epilepsy perhaps? Also low potassium can have this effect too.

                Since he recovers immediately I wouldn't have thought bloood clots were
                to blame, as you know the effects are dramatic. My Josh had a fit 3 months
                ago and it was dramatic and jerking limbs and terrified me.. he has not had
                one since and there was no known cause, so maybe heart meds can cause fits?

                Either way, I suggest a trip to the vets. If they are regular, try and
                video one to show the vet or write down exactly what happens.

                Lyn:)

                _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Westgold
                wow, what a story -- you must have been so scared. Unfortunately, seizures in an older cat are usually caused by brain tumors. Older cats do not usually get
                Message 7 of 13 , May 31 12:12 PM
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                  wow, what a story -- you must have been so scared. Unfortunately, seizures in an older cat are usually caused by brain tumors. Older cats do not usually get epilepsy. There's nothing that can be done. Pooh lived another 3 1/2 months after the day he had those 6 big seizures in a row. Then he had a stroke and I had to help him move up to heaven.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: cococy45
                  To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, May 31, 2010 2:46 PM
                  Subject: [FH] Re: Do cats faint?




                  Liz, I'm not sure I can help but will relate what happened with our Mellie two years ago...and since it has been two years I'm hoping I can remember the details. You might do a search for Mellie as I believe I joined the group shortly after her events which were early May, 2008.

                  We had been away from home for about 3 hrs and within minutes of our coming in I heard her crying, that mournful cry as if she were about to upchuck. I was at the kitchen sink so grabbed paper towels and went to her - she was about 8 ft away. When I got to where I could see her, she was turning in a circle, salivating, opening/closing her mouth (I told the vet she was "chomping") not licking as they do when about to upchuck, and she slowly sank to the floor. I had my hands on either side of her as I didn't want her to really fall over and hurt herself. She was breathing very rapidly too. I first called her regular vet (Dr. G) but quickly remembered he doesn't work Tuesdays and none of the other vets had seen her there. Then I called the clinic where her sister went for acupuncture and they'd seen Mellie a couple times for acupuncture for arthritis, we had her there within 10 minutes and she was seen immediately.

                  Dr. D listened to her chest as she sounded very congested and he did a chest xray and bloodwork. He heard a grade 3 heart murmur which had never been mentioned to me prior. He made us stay until the bloodwork was done, it came back pretty much unremarkable as the only thing even slightly off was BUN at one point above normal. Creatinine was 1.7 which was well within normal range. He gave her an injection of a small amount of chlorpromazine for the suspected nausea. His diagnosis was that she had fainted, he advised we take her to a local clinic for heart echo due to the murmur, we got an appt for Thursday for the echo.

                  When we got her home I opened the carrier but did not take her out, I waited for her to get out on her own, this took almost 10 minutes. We noticed she had her eyes closed or barely open, squinting. Just a few minutes later she cried, went in a circle, and collapsed down again. That was about 5:30. She did it again at 7:30p. Dr. D called at 8p to see how she was, when I told him of the additional episodes he said she was having seizures and to take her to the ER if it happened again. At 9p it did happen again, we took her to ER where they hooked her up to IV and kept her overnight. I called to check on her at 11p, she had just had another episode with the vet watching - vet did not know whether it was syncope of seizure, gave valium IV. We picked her up the next morning to transport her to Dr. D for observation.

                  She has never had another episode. We kept the appt with local vet for heart echo - he dx her as having advanced HCM, nothing to be done for her, both Dr. G and Dr. D advised putting her down. No way. Three weeks later we were able to get appt with cardiologist almost 3 hrs away. He dx her having very rapid heart rate of 220+, which caused the mitral valve flap to pull down/over thus partially blocking the outflow of blood from heart to the body. Body organs were not getting adequate blood supply. Atenolol was prescribed to slow the heart rate. She was still having great difficulty walking and advised she be checked by the neuro dept. Bloodwork was done, her creatinine had risen to 2.6.

                  A month later she was seen by neuro who advised she had left forebrain injury caused by either stroke, tumor, birth defect unmasked by lack of blood and only time would tell. We chose to not have an MRI done as we felt surgery was not an option at her age. The recheck two months later found her improved by 70% and it was at this point that neuro advised he felt she had suffered a stroke or brain bleed which had resolved slowly. She was almost completely back to normal.

                  After the day of episodes we changed to a cats only clinic as she needed to be as stressfree as possible. She had a checkup and bloodwork Friday. Her creatinine has continued to rise, is now 3.9. A few weeks after the episodes I talked with her long-time vet, Dr. G, to ask if he'd noticed rapid heart rate or murmur. Yes, he had, but he'd thought they were related to stress of being in the clinic. I bought a stethoscope and learned her heart rate at home was 220.

                  Vets should let us know everything they find so that we can follow-up at home to be sure such things are or are not stress related.

                  I've tried to remember everything. Hope your kitty does well. Sure must be a fighter to have recovered from the clots - fantastic!!!

                  carol and mellie

                  --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Liz" <chuckliz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > We're in uncharted territory here...Brandy is a 15-year-old saddle thrombus survivor (the first survivor ever for our vets' practice). He threw the clot on April 8, so he's almost two months post-clot now.
                  >
                  > Brandy has had a couple of episodes lately, one last Tuesday and one this morning, where he seemed to pass out very briefly. In one case he was in a standing position and actually fell off the side of the bed; in the other, he was sitting and just fell uninhibited onto his side on the bed. In both cases, he walked up to me just before it happened and stared deeply into my eyes which was a little unsettling. If he's actually "out", it's only for a moment. When he fell off the bed, he wasn't able to catch himself by the time he hit the floor but righted himself within a few seconds. He seems to recover fully physically in a few minutes' time, although he's quiet for the next few hours.
                  >
                  > Brandy is on a number of drugs because he also has CRF and a lung mass. His heart/circulatory system meds include diltiazem, enalapril and Plavix. He just saw the vet Thursday for his regular checkup and had full labs run - all was within normal limits, even the kidney values which have improved since the April clot. His blood pressure is also normal (was elevated before the clot) and his lung X-ray indicated little growth of the mass.
                  >
                  > I was willing to write the first episode off as momentary lack of coordination but now that we've had a second one, I suspect something else is going on. My husband and I are wondering if he's having mini-strokes even though he's on the Plavix to try to prevent clotting.
                  >
                  > Does anyone have any thoughts as to what might be going on?
                  >
                  > Many thanks!
                  >
                  > Liz and Brandy
                  >





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Suzianne Painter-Thorne
                  This may or may not be true. It depends on the cat. It could be a tumor, it could be another underlying medical condition (kidney disease), or it could be
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 31 12:19 PM
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                    This may or may not be true. It depends on the cat. It could be a tumor, it
                    could be another underlying medical condition (kidney disease), or it could
                    be something else entirely like exposure to a toxin. It's also possible that
                    the cat could have had seizures earlier in her life and the human was just
                    not there to witness it. When my Calvin kitty had seizures, our vet advised
                    us that for every seizure we saw, he likely had 2 to 3 others. Calvin lived
                    to 18.

                    Please don't think that just because your cat has a seizure it is caused by
                    a tumor and there is no hope. It is always worth checking with a vet.

                    Sue & Boo


                    On 5/31/10 3:12 PM, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:

                    > wow, what a story -- you must have been so scared. Unfortunately, seizures in
                    > an older cat are usually caused by brain tumors. Older cats do not usually
                    > get epilepsy. There's nothing that can be done. Pooh lived another 3 1/2
                    > months after the day he had those 6 big seizures in a row. Then he had a
                    > stroke and I had to help him move up to heaven.
                  • cococy45
                    The neurology specialist did not feel Mellie had seizures at all; however, the brain damage caused by the bleed leaves her susceptible for seizures - she s
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 31 1:04 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      The neurology specialist did not feel Mellie had seizures at all; however, the brain damage caused by the bleed leaves her susceptible for seizures - she's never had one so we are indeed lucky. My mother died of a malignant brain tumor and she never had a seizure.

                      One often reads that crf can cause so many other problems such as blood pressure and heart problems. My feeling is the opposite - heart problems can cause crf. If our original vet had mentioned to us how rapid Mellie's heart rate was I would have monitored it at home and we would have known it was not a stress-related problem but a definite heart condition and would have treated itbefore it caused other problems.

                      There is a very helpful group for cats with epilepsy. I joined that group first, then they suggested I join this one. It was through the epilepsy group that I learned about the specialists in Columbus.

                      So sorry about your dear Pooh.

                      carol and mellie





                      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > wow, what a story -- you must have been so scared. Unfortunately, seizures in an older cat are usually caused by brain tumors. Older cats do not usually get epilepsy. There's nothing that can be done. Pooh lived another 3 1/2 months after the day he had those 6 big seizures in a row. Then he had a stroke and I had to help him move up to heaven.
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: cococy45
                      > To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Monday, May 31, 2010 2:46 PM
                      > Subject: [FH] Re: Do cats faint?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Liz, I'm not sure I can help but will relate what happened with our Mellie two years ago...and since it has been two years I'm hoping I can remember the details. You might do a search for Mellie as I believe I joined the group shortly after her events which were early May, 2008.
                      >
                      > We had been away from home for about 3 hrs and within minutes of our coming in I heard her crying, that mournful cry as if she were about to upchuck. I was at the kitchen sink so grabbed paper towels and went to her - she was about 8 ft away. When I got to where I could see her, she was turning in a circle, salivating, opening/closing her mouth (I told the vet she was "chomping") not licking as they do when about to upchuck, and she slowly sank to the floor. I had my hands on either side of her as I didn't want her to really fall over and hurt herself. She was breathing very rapidly too. I first called her regular vet (Dr. G) but quickly remembered he doesn't work Tuesdays and none of the other vets had seen her there. Then I called the clinic where her sister went for acupuncture and they'd seen Mellie a couple times for acupuncture for arthritis, we had her there within 10 minutes and she was seen immediately.
                      >
                      > Dr. D listened to her chest as she sounded very congested and he did a chest xray and bloodwork. He heard a grade 3 heart murmur which had never been mentioned to me prior. He made us stay until the bloodwork was done, it came back pretty much unremarkable as the only thing even slightly off was BUN at one point above normal. Creatinine was 1.7 which was well within normal range. He gave her an injection of a small amount of chlorpromazine for the suspected nausea. His diagnosis was that she had fainted, he advised we take her to a local clinic for heart echo due to the murmur, we got an appt for Thursday for the echo.
                      >
                      > When we got her home I opened the carrier but did not take her out, I waited for her to get out on her own, this took almost 10 minutes. We noticed she had her eyes closed or barely open, squinting. Just a few minutes later she cried, went in a circle, and collapsed down again. That was about 5:30. She did it again at 7:30p. Dr. D called at 8p to see how she was, when I told him of the additional episodes he said she was having seizures and to take her to the ER if it happened again. At 9p it did happen again, we took her to ER where they hooked her up to IV and kept her overnight. I called to check on her at 11p, she had just had another episode with the vet watching - vet did not know whether it was syncope of seizure, gave valium IV. We picked her up the next morning to transport her to Dr. D for observation.
                      >
                      > She has never had another episode. We kept the appt with local vet for heart echo - he dx her as having advanced HCM, nothing to be done for her, both Dr. G and Dr. D advised putting her down. No way. Three weeks later we were able to get appt with cardiologist almost 3 hrs away. He dx her having very rapid heart rate of 220+, which caused the mitral valve flap to pull down/over thus partially blocking the outflow of blood from heart to the body. Body organs were not getting adequate blood supply. Atenolol was prescribed to slow the heart rate. She was still having great difficulty walking and advised she be checked by the neuro dept. Bloodwork was done, her creatinine had risen to 2.6.
                      >
                      > A month later she was seen by neuro who advised she had left forebrain injury caused by either stroke, tumor, birth defect unmasked by lack of blood and only time would tell. We chose to not have an MRI done as we felt surgery was not an option at her age. The recheck two months later found her improved by 70% and it was at this point that neuro advised he felt she had suffered a stroke or brain bleed which had resolved slowly. She was almost completely back to normal.
                      >
                      > After the day of episodes we changed to a cats only clinic as she needed to be as stressfree as possible. She had a checkup and bloodwork Friday. Her creatinine has continued to rise, is now 3.9. A few weeks after the episodes I talked with her long-time vet, Dr. G, to ask if he'd noticed rapid heart rate or murmur. Yes, he had, but he'd thought they were related to stress of being in the clinic. I bought a stethoscope and learned her heart rate at home was 220.
                      >
                      > Vets should let us know everything they find so that we can follow-up at home to be sure such things are or are not stress related.
                      >
                      > I've tried to remember everything. Hope your kitty does well. Sure must be a fighter to have recovered from the clots - fantastic!!!
                      >
                      > carol and mellie
                      >
                      > --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Liz" <chuckliz@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > We're in uncharted territory here...Brandy is a 15-year-old saddle thrombus survivor (the first survivor ever for our vets' practice). He threw the clot on April 8, so he's almost two months post-clot now.
                      > >
                      > > Brandy has had a couple of episodes lately, one last Tuesday and one this morning, where he seemed to pass out very briefly. In one case he was in a standing position and actually fell off the side of the bed; in the other, he was sitting and just fell uninhibited onto his side on the bed. In both cases, he walked up to me just before it happened and stared deeply into my eyes which was a little unsettling. If he's actually "out", it's only for a moment. When he fell off the bed, he wasn't able to catch himself by the time he hit the floor but righted himself within a few seconds. He seems to recover fully physically in a few minutes' time, although he's quiet for the next few hours.
                      > >
                      > > Brandy is on a number of drugs because he also has CRF and a lung mass. His heart/circulatory system meds include diltiazem, enalapril and Plavix. He just saw the vet Thursday for his regular checkup and had full labs run - all was within normal limits, even the kidney values which have improved since the April clot. His blood pressure is also normal (was elevated before the clot) and his lung X-ray indicated little growth of the mass.
                      > >
                      > > I was willing to write the first episode off as momentary lack of coordination but now that we've had a second one, I suspect something else is going on. My husband and I are wondering if he's having mini-strokes even though he's on the Plavix to try to prevent clotting.
                      > >
                      > > Does anyone have any thoughts as to what might be going on?
                      > >
                      > > Many thanks!
                      > >
                      > > Liz and Brandy
                      > >
                      >
                      >
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                    • Mmayer11
                      Friends, Please remember this older cat is on all kinds of meds. The medication could easily cause this. Liz needs to get her cat to a specialist. I hope she
                      Message 10 of 13 , May 31 4:41 PM
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                        Friends,
                        Please remember this older cat is on all kinds of meds. The medication could easily cause this. Liz needs to get her cat to a specialist. I hope she has by now!
                        Liz, please give us an update.



                        Marianna








                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Suzianne Painter-Thorne
                        Thank you Marianna, that is such a good point. I didn t realize about all the meds, but that too could be a culprit. Really, there are so many possibilities
                        Message 11 of 13 , May 31 5:04 PM
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                          Thank you Marianna, that is such a good point. I didn't realize about all
                          the meds, but that too could be a culprit. Really, there are so many
                          possibilities and we can't know until after some testing.

                          Sue & Boo


                          On 5/31/10 7:41 PM, "Mmayer11" <mmayer11@...> wrote:

                          >
                          > Friends,
                          > Please remember this older cat is on all kinds of meds. The medication could
                          > easily cause this. Liz needs to get her cat to a specialist. I hope she has by
                          > now!
                          > Liz, please give us an update.
                          >
                        • Mmayer11
                          Yes, Sue. You are the voice of sanity. In my experience as an example I have had a beloved dog who was early on mis-diagnosed with a brain tumor. But as you
                          Message 12 of 13 , May 31 5:58 PM
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                            Yes, Sue. You are the voice of sanity. In my experience as an example I have had a beloved dog who was early on mis-diagnosed with a brain tumor.

                            But as you rightly point out, and as I was trying to underscore...this is going off on a tangent and therefore unproductive for Brandy...it has nothing whatever to do with Brandy IMO.

                            Please can we hear from Liz regarding Brandy? I hope by now Liz, you have sought the help of a specialist...which we are not!



                            Marianna




                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Suzianne Painter-Thorne <npumie@...>
                            To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Mon, May 31, 2010 8:04 pm
                            Subject: Re: [FH] Re: Do cats faint?





                            Thank you Marianna, that is such a good point. I didn't realize about all
                            the meds, but that too could be a culprit. Really, there are so many
                            possibilities and we can't know until after some testing.

                            Sue & Boo

                            On 5/31/10 7:41 PM, "Mmayer11" <mmayer11@...> wrote:

                            >
                            > Friends,
                            > Please remember this older cat is on all kinds of meds. The medication could
                            > easily cause this. Liz needs to get her cat to a specialist. I hope she has by
                            > now!
                            > Liz, please give us an update.
                            >









                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • C.R.
                            hi Michelle and all, Michelle, I m so sorry what you went through with Pooh. Losing your little furbaby so quickly after diagnosis is really awful. We went
                            Message 13 of 13 , May 31 10:59 PM
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                              hi Michelle and all,

                              Michelle, I'm so sorry what you went through with Pooh. Losing your little furbaby so quickly after diagnosis is really awful. We went through something similar with our Bouncer. He was fine one day and we found out he had pancreatic cancer, and three weeks later he was gone. It's really very, very hard to deal with it when it happens so fast, like you don't have time to do anything.

                              I don't want everyone to get all worried and upset about Michelle's experience. Seizures can be caused from a number of things, yes, one of those being a tumor, but there are other causes too. Seizures many times can be caused from liver or kidney toxicity too. My angels Fritzy and Sweetie both had liver disease (along with all their other things - heart, kidney/CRF, IBD), and liver and/or kidney toxicity can cause seizures. They both had seizures for the better part of the last two years of both their lives... and YES they're scarey and YES they can be very serious, but you can also do things to lessen them, and in come cases keep them from recurring completely. There are medications (Phenobarbitol is one typically given for seizures, but Phenobarb can also be toxic to the liver, so that one is a real viscous circle), and holistic treatments (acupuncture, herbs, homeopathics, supplements), and with the proper use of any of these things, seizures caused from other than brain tumors can be treated, hopefully successfully. Fritzy and Sweetie had a minimal number of seizures after we chose to go the holistic route with acupuncture, herbs and supplements. Their seizures were much less and less severe after a while on treatments.

                              Everyone please remember to be very gentle with your replies when you're talking about things like tumors and other life-threatening things. Remember that we're all kind of at the ends of our ropes and how emotional this all is. We're all just sharing our own experiences, and it's not meant to "scare" anyone. We just want to get the word out of what we've all gone through in the hopes that it can help someone else here.

                              hugs,
                              Carol & Angel Snowball *5/10/91 to 1/1/10*
                              & the gang
                              http://carolandsteveskitties.shutterfly.com/
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o6bLwo5jPE
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxKQH2mM-d0



                              --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > wow, what a story -- you must have been so scared. Unfortunately, seizures in an older cat are usually caused by brain tumors. Older cats do not usually get epilepsy. There's nothing that can be done. Pooh lived another 3 1/2 months after the day he had those 6 big seizures in a row. Then he had a stroke and I had to help him move up to heaven.
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