Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Puff Puff

Expand Messages
  • wsuddaby
    Hello, I interested in some input from the group concerning a heart condition in a cat Puff Puff. I was wondering if I needed to fill out a questionnaire first
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 6 7:40 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,
      I interested in some input from the group concerning a heart condition in a cat Puff Puff. I was wondering if I needed to fill out a questionnaire first i.e to better assess his condition?
      Thank you for your time
      Ward
    • wsuddaby
      Hello, My name is Ward and I am writing on behalf of my friend s Cat Puff Puff.He is a neutered 3 year old orange tabby.He was diagnosed with a heart condition
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 7 10:29 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello,
        My name is Ward and I am writing on behalf of my friend's Cat Puff Puff.He is a neutered 3 year old orange tabby.He was diagnosed with a heart condition in July of 2009 to the surprise of all because he exhibited no outward physical symptoms at all.He was seen by a vet cardiologist.Here are her most recent findings as of the end of March.The echo cardiogram revealed a bicuspid aortic valve with nodular thickening in the anatomic region of the non coronary cusp.Additionally valve opening is restricted as a result of this valvular defect.The velocity of aortic outflow is similar to previous, and there is a substantive amount of aortic insufficiency.These findings represent a congenital abnormality . In Puff Puff based on the echo cardiograph appearance the non coronary and left aortic valve cusps are fused resulting in the bicuspid valve. Given that Puff Puff is asymptomatic at this time and the stenosis is mild medical management recommendations at this time consist of bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis precautions and follow up evaluations to monitor progression of valve dysfunction and AI.Balloon valvuloplasty to relieve stenosis is not recommended as it would certainly worsen the AI. She does not recommend any drug therapy at this time since he is not in heart failure and some drugs would be contraindicated given his asthmatic disease. She is not concerned about the stenosis but is concerned about the amount of AI.She wants to monitor cardiac function and chamber size closely since substantive AI does volume overload the left ventricle and can result in left-sided congestive heart failure.

        I was wondering if the asthma they have discovered is related to his heart issues? Also he is not been treated at all for the asthma, I believe he should be getting inhaler medication to relieve stress on the heart.
        Any insight to any of this would be most welcome. I hope this wasn't too confusing, I tried to write what was in her report. I thank you in advance for any help or suggestions. I am hoping some one has encountered a similar situation with their cat and has found a successful way to treat it
        Kind regards
        Ward
      • Westgold
        Hi & welcome to the list. None of us wants to be on this list, but we re sure glad it s here!!! I can t help you with any of your kitty s details, others will
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 7 10:40 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi & welcome to the list. None of us wants to be on this list, but we're sure glad it's here!!!
          I can't help you with any of your kitty's details, others will be able to. But I want to tell you to NEVER allow your vet to give Puff Puff any kind of steroids for the asthma. If it gets worse, there are several non-steroid inhalers, other can help you with that too. Steroids can kill a kitty with heart problems -- be very clear about this to your vet, to never give them for anything.

          take care -- Michelle & Tigger Too in Toronto
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: wsuddaby
          To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 1:29 PM
          Subject: [FH] Puff Puff



          Hello,
          My name is Ward and I am writing on behalf of my friend's Cat Puff Puff.He is a neutered 3 year old orange tabby.He was diagnosed with a heart condition in July of 2009 to the surprise of all because he exhibited no outward physical symptoms at all.He was seen by a vet cardiologist.Here are her most recent findings as of the end of March.The echo cardiogram revealed a bicuspid aortic valve with nodular thickening in the anatomic region of the non coronary cusp.Additionally valve opening is restricted as a result of this valvular defect.The velocity of aortic outflow is similar to previous, and there is a substantive amount of aortic insufficiency.These findings represent a congenital abnormality . In Puff Puff based on the echo cardiograph appearance the non coronary and left aortic valve cusps are fused resulting in the bicuspid valve. Given that Puff Puff is asymptomatic at this time and the stenosis is mild medical management recommendations at this time consist of bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis precautions and follow up evaluations to monitor progression of valve dysfunction and AI.Balloon valvuloplasty to relieve stenosis is not recommended as it would certainly worsen the AI. She does not recommend any drug therapy at this time since he is not in heart failure and some drugs would be contraindicated given his asthmatic disease. She is not concerned about the stenosis but is concerned about the amount of AI.She wants to monitor cardiac function and chamber size closely since substantive AI does volume overload the left ventricle and can result in left-sided congestive heart failure.

          I was wondering if the asthma they have discovered is related to his heart issues? Also he is not been treated at all for the asthma, I believe he should be getting inhaler medication to relieve stress on the heart.
          Any insight to any of this would be most welcome. I hope this wasn't too confusing, I tried to write what was in her report. I thank you in advance for any help or suggestions. I am hoping some one has encountered a similar situation with their cat and has found a successful way to treat it
          Kind regards
          Ward





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Pat
          Hi Ward; ... From: wsuddaby ... The cat is very lucky not to be needing meds for the heart condition, and this indicates that it isn t a
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 7 10:15 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Ward;

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "wsuddaby" <wsuddaby@...>
            > I was wondering if the asthma they have discovered is related to his heart
            > issues? Also he is not been treated at all for the asthma, I believe he
            > >should be getting inhaler medication to relieve stress on the heart.

            The cat is very lucky not to be needing meds for the heart condition, and
            this indicates that it isn't a major problem at present. Pepper has had to
            have meds since diagnosis of the hole in his heart causing irregular heart
            action, and in his short life, (2 1/2 years to date), we have been able to
            see gradual deterioration.

            Our diabetic cat has seasonal asthma and what Margie Scherk recommended for
            him was use of periactin, (aka cyproheptidine), which is an antihistamine.
            Once a cat is on inhalers it is pretty well impossible to reverse the need
            for this practice and both Margie and I have serious questions in regard to
            where the residual steroids end up in the body as they aren't excreated with
            much detectable amount. The cypro has helped our diabetic cat for many
            years. He is now considered very geriatric at 19 years of age, and has had
            a heart murmur that doesn't increase in category for all the years we have
            had him in our lives with yearly checkups. Some years the heart murmur is
            not detectable so the periactin is not causing stress on his heart.

            HTH......Pat and all the boys
            http://felinenutritionalnotes.blogspot.com/
            http://petfoodpitfalls.blogspot.com/
            http://eliminationdietforpets.blogspot.com/
          • debbie.bendell
            I second Michelle s message about no steroids for a kitty with heart problems. My cat Aja was given a steroid injection for stomatitis (mouth inflammation).
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 8 9:33 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              I second Michelle's message about no steroids for a kitty with heart problems. My cat Aja was given a steroid injection for stomatitis (mouth inflammation). Two days later she was in ICU for the weekend. I didn't know she had HCM, and the steroid injection caused pulmonary edema. That means her lungs were filling with fluid and she couldn't breathe. Aja's story has a happy ending because she survived. After she recovered from the pulmonary edema she had I131 for hyperthyroid, and her heart problem resolved when hyperthyroid was cured.

              Debbie
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.