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Re:Breeders Perspective

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  • elfinmyst@aol.com
    Hi My foundation breeding boy had HCM, we collected him at 3 months old and he was diagnosed with a heart murmur at the vet check. I had him scanned and HCM
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 1, 2009
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      Hi

      My foundation breeding boy had HCM, we collected him at 3 months old and he
      was diagnosed with a heart murmur at the vet check. I had him scanned and
      HCM was diagnosed. I was unfortunate enough that my foundation girl had the
      same diagnosis three weeks later. The breeder was devastated and we kept
      both kittens.

      I neutered the HCM kitties and they're much loved pets. I bought another
      foundation girl a year later who was scanned twice under the UK FAB scheme
      for HCM and heart disorders. I would not breed from any girl who was not
      scanned and all my kittens are scanned, but then I only have one small hobby
      litter a year so it's easier for me.

      My kittens are scanned too and so far all have been negative. It's £200 for
      a scan, but well worth it. The certificate is available online with the
      cats name and pedigree. My cats have had samples taken and hope to find the
      genetic cause of HCM in their breed and then I would test each and every cat
      without exception if there were a test available.

      Lyn

      _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tafoster4000
      Hi I do have a question, are we talking HCM developing in young cats? I have/had 2 cornish rex cats that had/have HCM. I lost my Domino at 18 1/2 to heart
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Hi
        I do have a question, are we talking HCM developing in young cats? I have/had 2 cornish rex cats that had/have HCM. I lost my Domino at 18 1/2 to heart failure but we are pretty sure his HCM was secondary to hyperT. Now my 20 year old rex was diagnosed when he was 15 and is still hanging in there. In my case neither breeder is still breeding cornies. but if they were, should they have been notified about HCM in older cats?

        Taca and Angel Domino, Pyewacket and Moe

        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "gaileder" <greder@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi
        > I am a New Zealand breeder of siamese and orientals. I have just found out that some of the cats I breed have developed HCM so I have had to terminate my breeding activities.
        > I have a question:
        > How many of you with pedigree cats which have developed this problem have told the breeder of your cat.
        > I have come to realise how important this is because if the breeders are not told there is a problem they will keep using the same lines.
        >
      • dshale1
        When Pye was diagnosed with very mild HCM 2.5 years ago at age 9, we told the breeder (Pye is a British shorthair). She said she had only heard of one other
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 7, 2009
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          When Pye was diagnosed with very mild HCM 2.5 years ago at age 9, we told the breeder (Pye is a British shorthair). She said she had only heard of one other case of HCM in the breeding lines she is involved with and it wasn't one of her own cats. She did say she knew there had been a case of HCM in on Pye's mother's side. To her knowledge none of Pye's littermates have been diagnosed with HCM to date, and I've always wondered why Pye had it and not her brother because I thought males were more susceptible.

          It seems to me that when a breed doesn't tend to develop HCM until they are much older, as seems to be the case with British shorthairs, by the time they are diagnosed they have been long retired from breeding, but have already passed on their genes. I am not sure it has been demonstrated that when cats develop HCM later in life it is due to a genetic propensity--is that true?
          -Susan

          --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "gaileder" <greder@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi
          > I am a New Zealand breeder of siamese and orientals. I have just found out that some of the cats I breed have developed HCM so I have had to terminate my breeding activities.
          > I have a question:
          > How many of you with pedigree cats which have developed this problem have told the breeder of your cat.
          > I have come to realise how important this is because if the breeders are not told there is a problem they will keep using the same lines.
          >
        • tootsiepop1421@aol.com
          In my case the Breeder has died and who knows where all her cats went. I m sure that another breeder got them, so who do you tell? [Non-text portions of this
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
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            In my case the Breeder has died and who knows where all her cats went.
            I'm sure that another breeder got them, so who do you tell?


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Cheryl
            Hi Susan, Every kitty born from an HCM parent has a 50% chance of inheriting the disease. Sex does not matter, although it is said that males typically
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 8, 2009
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              Hi Susan,
              Every kitty born from an HCM parent has a 50% chance of inheriting the
              disease. Sex does not matter, although it is said that males typically
              develop the disease faster than females. I know there are exceptions to
              this rule though. My Vizzy was diagnosed with RCM at age 10. He has a
              sister who died of HCM (sudden death - the owners were not aware she had it)
              at age 5. Their mother was not diagnosed with HCM until she was 10 years
              old, and a half-sister (same mother, different father, was diagnosed with
              mild HCM at 1.5 years). That is what makes HCM so challenging for breeders.
              Even for those who do screen for HCM, a normal screen does not guarantee
              that their cats do not have the disease. Unfortunately, a lot of breeders
              only do an echocardiogram once on their breeding cats, and then they think
              they are in the clear, which is not the case. I have been breeding
              Norwegian Forest Cats for 10 years now, and I do my best to scan my breeding
              cats every 1-2 years. I lived in Tucson, AZ for six years, and there were
              no cardiologists in the area. We just recently moved to Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
              I haven't checked to see if there are cardiologists locally, but I know the
              vet school in Ames has some very good ones.

              Cheryl

              -----Original Message-----
              From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of dshale1
              Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 12:12 AM
              To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [FH] Re: Breeders Perspective

              When Pye was diagnosed with very mild HCM 2.5 years ago at age 9, we told
              the breeder (Pye is a British shorthair). She said she had only heard of one
              other case of HCM in the breeding lines she is involved with and it wasn't
              one of her own cats. She did say she knew there had been a case of HCM in on
              Pye's mother's side. To her knowledge none of Pye's littermates have been
              diagnosed with HCM to date, and I've always wondered why Pye had it and not
              her brother because I thought males were more susceptible.

              It seems to me that when a breed doesn't tend to develop HCM until they are
              much older, as seems to be the case with British shorthairs, by the time
              they are diagnosed they have been long retired from breeding, but have
              already passed on their genes. I am not sure it has been demonstrated that
              when cats develop HCM later in life it is due to a genetic propensity--is
              that true?
              -Susan

              --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "gaileder" <greder@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi
              > I am a New Zealand breeder of siamese and orientals. I have just found out
              that some of the cats I breed have developed HCM so I have had to terminate
              my breeding activities.
              > I have a question:
              > How many of you with pedigree cats which have developed this problem have
              told the breeder of your cat.
              > I have come to realise how important this is because if the breeders are
              not told there is a problem they will keep using the same lines.
              >




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            • melaniejanie
              Hi all, I am a relatively new breeder (3 years) and while I have had no HCM so far, I would like to scan all my breeding cats. I am based in the UK and have
              Message 6 of 21 , Aug 26, 2010
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                Hi all,
                I am a relatively new breeder (3 years) and while I have had no HCM so far, I would like to scan all my breeding cats. I am based in the UK and have looked into the FAB Cats list of registered cardiologists who provide HCM scans. I've called a handful of them and all have quoted prices between £300 and £400 per cat (not to mention the travel costs to get there). I cannot afford to do this every year as I am only a small breeder and already I make a loss breeding as we feed good food, show a lot and do a lot of other health testing.

                I am wondering if those of you based in the UK who have done proactive screening could provide details of the cardiologist used and the price you were charged? I really think that if scans were more affordable there would be a lot more breeders willing to check their cats regularly.

                Thanks in advance
                Mel



                --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, elfinmyst@... wrote:
                >
                > Hi
                >
                > My foundation breeding boy had HCM, we collected him at 3 months old and he
                > was diagnosed with a heart murmur at the vet check. I had him scanned and
                > HCM was diagnosed. I was unfortunate enough that my foundation girl had the
                > same diagnosis three weeks later. The breeder was devastated and we kept
                > both kittens.
                >
                > I neutered the HCM kitties and they're much loved pets. I bought another
                > foundation girl a year later who was scanned twice under the UK FAB scheme
                > for HCM and heart disorders. I would not breed from any girl who was not
                > scanned and all my kittens are scanned, but then I only have one small hobby
                > litter a year so it's easier for me.
                >
                > My kittens are scanned too and so far all have been negative. It's £200 for
                > a scan, but well worth it. The certificate is available online with the
                > cats name and pedigree. My cats have had samples taken and hope to find the
                > genetic cause of HCM in their breed and then I would test each and every cat
                > without exception if there were a test available.
                >
                > Lyn
                >
                > _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • elfinmyst@aol.com
                Hi That s very expensive. My cats are scanned at the University of Liverpool small animal hospital. There is a similar university up in scotland too and I
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 27, 2010
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                  Hi

                  That's very expensive.

                  My cats are scanned at the University of Liverpool small animal hospital.
                  There is a similar university up in scotland too and I suspect they're
                  cheaper than a private cardiologist.

                  With a FAB scan, you need a cat with an identity chip and have them booked
                  in for a FAB scan. There's no appointment cost and it's just the scan and
                  comes to £200 per cat maximum. It takes about 20 minutes and you get a
                  certificate and your cats name goes on the HCM negative screened list at the FAB
                  site. You need a vet referal to the FAB scan.

                  Hope that helps.

                  :) Lyn

                  _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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