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Re: A question about respiratory rate

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  • banditbabe32
    Thank you all so much for your speedy replies. Marley is on an ACE inhibitor, imidapril, 0.25ml once daily, 5mg spiro once daily, 16mg furosemide twice plus a
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 3, 2009
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      Thank you all so much for your speedy replies. Marley is on an ACE inhibitor, imidapril, 0.25ml once daily, 5mg spiro once daily, 16mg furosemide twice plus a 3rd dose at 12mg. My cat is seeing one of the top cardiologists in the UK and they said that trials showed that the ACE inhibitor was the drug which increased the animal's life the longest. I will however ask about atenolol, but I always feel as if I am telling the experts what she should have if you know what i mean and feel a bit uncomfortable about it. She was diagnosed with severe HCM in September and it was very sudden.
      >
      >
      > --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "banditbabe32" <banditbabe32@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Could you please tell me what your HCM cat's respiration rate per minute is both awake and asleep. My cat's is between 38-48 awake and around 32 asleep. her awake rate worries me but her cariologist said that it can greatly vary from cat to cat and as long as it slows down when she is asleep I shouldnt worry so much.
      > >
      > > She has been like this for the last few weeks and we were all assuming she had a small amount of persistent fluid on the lungs (which she may well have) but I would have thought that if it was a life threatening amount she would have got worse by now?
      > >
      > > Just to clarify, we dont want to xray her chest unless absolutely necessary because last time the stress of it put her into heart failure.
      > >
      > > I would really appreciate knowing what other cat's rates are.
      > >
      > > Thanks x
      > >
      >
    • elfinmyst@aol.com
      Hi Respiratory rate is msot important when taken at rest, and not dreaming. If my cats go above thirty, it s usually a sign that fluid is building up and
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 4, 2009
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        Hi

        Respiratory rate is msot important when taken at rest, and not dreaming. If
        my cats go above thirty, it's usually a sign that fluid is building up and
        that's when I treat them. SOme just get an extra frucimide if they are on
        lower diuretics, but the ones with heart failure, I`d contact the
        cardiologist and have them listened to at my vet.

        They have been known to get temperatures with infections and this pushed
        the rate up, but a quick vet visit reassured me. Is you cat on any diuretics
        at all and what dose?

        Lyn

        _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


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