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Atenolol question

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  • C.R.
    I have another question about the meds. Do the drugs (Atenolol, Cardizem, Diltiazem) adversely affect the kidneys? I m trying to understand so I can make a
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 30, 2009
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      I have another question about the meds. Do the drugs (Atenolol, Cardizem, Diltiazem) adversely affect the kidneys? I'm trying to understand so I can make a decision on what to do for Snowball, and I'm coming across so many different bits of info.

      So Atenolol and other meds like that (Cardizem, Diltiazem), slow down the heart rate, so does that then slow down the blood flow to the organs (kidney in particular)? If that's so, then does that negatively impact the kidneys?

      I feel like I'm going to hurt her no matter what I choose to do. If I don't give her the meds, her heart will suffer, and if I give her something to slow down her heart, her kidneys will suffer. And I know you always treat the heart first, but I'm trying to make both organs happy.

      {sigh}

      hugs,
      Carol and Snowball and the gang
    • Sue
      Carol, The meds reduce the heart rate so it doesn t cause problems due to the enlargement of the heart. After the body uses the medicines, there are
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 30, 2009
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        Carol,

        The meds reduce the heart rate so it doesn't cause problems due to the
        enlargement of the heart. After the body "uses" the medicines, there are
        left-over chemicals remaining in the body. The issue with the kidneys is
        that it filters those chemicals out of the body and they are hard on the
        kidneys. All of these meds affect the kidneys.

        I don't know enough to go into more detail. Over time, it probably will
        cause a degree of kidney failure. Since you need the meds for the heart to
        work and you need the kidneys for the body to work, it truly is a balancing
        act. The objective is to use the lowest dose of meds you can and to try &
        keep them going so neither one fails entirely. When my girl went, both her
        heart & kidneys gave out together. I guess that meant we'd balanced her
        meds the best that we could.


        Sue & angels Pepper & Gandy
        with Nicholai, Lola-Joy and Isabella


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "C.R." <carolroars@...>
        To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 4:27 PM
        Subject: [FH] Atenolol question


        >I have another question about the meds. Do the drugs (Atenolol, Cardizem,
        >Diltiazem) adversely affect the kidneys? I'm trying to understand so I can
        >make a decision on what to do for Snowball, and I'm coming across so many
        >different bits of info.
        >
        > So Atenolol and other meds like that (Cardizem, Diltiazem), slow down the
        > heart rate, so does that then slow down the blood flow to the organs
        > (kidney in particular)? If that's so, then does that negatively impact
        > the kidneys?
        >
        > I feel like I'm going to hurt her no matter what I choose to do. If I
        > don't give her the meds, her heart will suffer, and if I give her
        > something to slow down her heart, her kidneys will suffer. And I know you
        > always treat the heart first, but I'm trying to make both organs happy.
        >
        > {sigh}
        >
        > hugs,
        > Carol and Snowball and the gang
        >
        >
      • C.R.
        hi Sue, Oh, I didn t think about that part of it... the clearing out of the medication through the kidneys and liver. I was worried about the action of the
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 30, 2009
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          hi Sue,

          Oh, I didn't think about that part of it... the clearing out of the medication through the kidneys and liver. I was worried about the action of the medication for the heart affecting the kidneys.

          Thanks for reminding me of that. I didn't remember that...I was so fixated on the action of the medication on the organs, I forgot about the other.

          hugs,
          Carol and Snowball and the gang


          --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Sue <susan@...> wrote:

          > The meds reduce the heart rate so it doesn't cause problems due to the enlargement of the heart. After the body "uses" the medicines, there are left-over chemicals remaining in the body. The issue with the kidneys is that it filters those chemicals out of the body and they are hard on the kidneys. All of these meds affect the kidneys.
          >
        • dshale1
          That s a good question. Our cardiologist told us that enalapril and furosemide are both hard on the kidneys, which is why when Pye first started on them, her
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 30, 2009
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            That's a good question. Our cardiologist told us that enalapril and furosemide are both hard on the kidneys, which is why when Pye first started on them, her kidney values were checked frequently. Since she has not had a problem, she isn't tested so often. She was on just atenolol for 1.5 years before her HCM got worse and the other meds were prescribed, but the cardiologist never said anything about atenolol affecting the kidneys.

            I don't think they want the heart rate slowed so much that it's not still in the normal range. Pye's HR on atenolol has always been 140-150, which the cardiologist said is right where he wants it. That is low-normal and I would guess the heart rate would need to dip abnormally low to impact blood flow enough to harm organs. But I don't know--it might be worth asking your cardiologist.
            -Susan


            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "C.R." <carolroars@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have another question about the meds. Do the drugs (Atenolol, Cardizem, Diltiazem) adversely affect the kidneys? I'm trying to understand so I can make a decision on what to do for Snowball, and I'm coming across so many different bits of info.
            >
            > So Atenolol and other meds like that (Cardizem, Diltiazem), slow down the heart rate, so does that then slow down the blood flow to the organs (kidney in particular)? If that's so, then does that negatively impact the kidneys?
            >
            > I feel like I'm going to hurt her no matter what I choose to do. If I don't give her the meds, her heart will suffer, and if I give her something to slow down her heart, her kidneys will suffer. And I know you always treat the heart first, but I'm trying to make both organs happy.
            >
            > {sigh}
            >
            > hugs,
            > Carol and Snowball and the gang
            >
          • elfinmyst@aol.com
            Hi Carol My cats have been on atenolol for a couple of years with no effects on the kidney values and it did stabilise their heart disease. Atenolol slows the
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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              Hi Carol

              My cats have been on atenolol for a couple of years with no effects on the
              kidney values and it did stabilise their heart disease. Atenolol slows the
              heart rate and also lowers blood pressure, but high blood pressure isn't
              good for kidneys either.

              It's such a balancing act. I have had kidney problems from diuretics, but
              never from the atenolol. It brought down the cats heart rates and pressure
              to normal, so that shouldn't effect other organs at all. As for clearing
              atenolol, that's a different issue, but so far :crossed paws!:: we haven't had
              any effects from it in long term use.

              Lyn :)

              _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Westgold
              I might be wrong, but I think that if you make sure they get plenty of water, that will help clear the drug through the kidney fast and easily enough. Do
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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                I might be wrong, but I think that if you make sure they get plenty of water, that will help clear the drug through the kidney fast and easily enough. Do whatever you can to help them drink a little more. I always put a lot of water into their canned food, and after they suck it dry, I add a little more water, etc, until they polished it all off. Some people get those fountains to encourage drinking. If you are still feeding dry food, know that dry food actually sucks water out of their body to make the food soft enough to pass through -- with dry food they end up with a negative water balance. All kitties should be on canned food.
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: elfinmyst@...
                To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2009 5:42 AM
                Subject: [FH] Re: Atenolol question


                Hi Carol

                My cats have been on atenolol for a couple of years with no effects on the
                kidney values and it did stabilise their heart disease. Atenolol slows the
                heart rate and also lowers blood pressure, but high blood pressure isn't
                good for kidneys either.

                It's such a balancing act. I have had kidney problems from diuretics, but
                never from the atenolol. It brought down the cats heart rates and pressure
                to normal, so that shouldn't effect other organs at all. As for clearing
                atenolol, that's a different issue, but so far :crossed paws!:: we haven't had
                any effects from it in long term use.

                Lyn :)

                _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • jintzr
                My Ivy has been on atenolol since she was 3 months old, and she just turned 4, with no negative impact on her kidney values. Donna
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 6, 2009
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                  My Ivy has been on atenolol since she was 3 months old, and she just turned 4, with no negative impact on her kidney values.

                  Donna

                  --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, elfinmyst@... wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Carol
                  >
                  > My cats have been on atenolol for a couple of years with no effects on the
                  > kidney values and it did stabilise their heart disease. Atenolol slows the
                  > heart rate and also lowers blood pressure, but high blood pressure isn't
                  > good for kidneys either.
                  >
                  > It's such a balancing act. I have had kidney problems from diuretics, but
                  > never from the atenolol. It brought down the cats heart rates and pressure
                  > to normal, so that shouldn't effect other organs at all. As for clearing
                  > atenolol, that's a different issue, but so far :crossed paws!:: we haven't had
                  > any effects from it in long term use.
                  >
                  > Lyn :)
                  >
                  > _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
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