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Re: Why is saddle thrombosis fatal so often?

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  • elfinmyst@aol.com
    Hi The pain is the most urgent thing and can be controlled with morphine but there are other issues too, such as tissue death. If the clot blocks the artery
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 4 3:52 AM
      Hi

      The pain is the most urgent thing and can be controlled with morphine but
      there are other issues too, such as tissue death. If the clot blocks the
      artery and the cells die, then there is no alternative but to amputate and
      clot kitties are often very weak and sick.

      If there is a vague pulse, there is more hope and massage can help, but
      there needs to be an clot busting drug given immediately too.. I think heparin
      is first choice?

      A lot depends on how quickly it is found, if the tissue starts to die and
      how large the clot is. My girl survived a clot to her heart against all odds
      a few months ago and most of the heart is now beating again.

      Lyn

      _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • JpG
      In April s case, I discovered her in the early morning laying there. So we think that from the time she was paralyzed to the time I got her to the clinic was
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 4 4:54 AM
        In April's case, I discovered her in the early morning laying there. So we think that from the time she was paralyzed to the time I got her to the clinic was roughly an hour. It seems though she may have had the clot there weeks before but we didnt know that. She had been given heparin but to no avail since she was apparently so sick she got another clot.
        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, elfinmyst@... wrote:
        >
        > Hi
        >
        > The pain is the most urgent thing and can be controlled with morphine but
        > there are other issues too, such as tissue death. If the clot blocks the
        > artery and the cells die, then there is no alternative but to amputate and
        > clot kitties are often very weak and sick.
        >
        > If there is a vague pulse, there is more hope and massage can help, but
        > there needs to be an clot busting drug given immediately too.. I think heparin
        > is first choice?
        >
        > A lot depends on how quickly it is found, if the tissue starts to die and
        > how large the clot is. My girl survived a clot to her heart against all odds
        > a few months ago and most of the heart is now beating again.
        >
        > Lyn
        >
        > _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Kim Gregory
        To offer an example of a cat who did throw a saddle thrombosis and came through - my Missi threw a clot, she WAS in a lot of pain and the vet was pessimistic
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 9 3:32 PM
          To offer an example of a cat who did throw a saddle thrombosis and came through - my Missi threw a clot, she WAS in a lot of pain and the vet was pessimistic (sp?) and told me that she had never had a cat treated successfully.  I told her to try anyway - I suppose it helped that Missi had been healthy before this with only bronchitis diagnosed.  I think Missi  was treated with heparin, diuretics and of course pain meds.  She was totally paralysed in her back legs. 

          Missi was an oriental and they can be funny when kept in hospital but you never really know until you try - she was fine and the vet and nurses were fantastic they fawned over her and this was despite the fact that I was forever telling them what to do and what not to do.  Missi started to respond to treatment in the early hours of the morning following it happening.  She stayed in all weekend - the staff as I say couldnt have been better - they massaged her legs and slowly gradually Missi began to get partial use back in her legs, first one then the other.

          She was allowed home on the Monday - still very wobbly but her legs got stronger and stronger and she did recover full use of her legs.  Unfortunately as we know saddle thrombosis is nearly always related to heart disease and worse luck she turned out to have the most serious kind of heart problem - RCM. 

          Missi lived another 8 months and she did have several episodes of CHF but she had fantastic quality of live - she loved and revelled in every second she had left and this included the day she died.  She was a complete star and an inspiration to me and all who knew her.  Her vet a cardiologist adored her and says he learned so much from her about what cats can and can't tolerate. 

          I am honoured to have known her and I am humbled by how well she handled her illness.  I do think that sometimes vets are overly pessimistic and pass this on to owners - its one of these things if vets are overly reluctant to try to treat it then they will not see a good success rate which in turn will make them favour not treating...  Sometimes treatment is successful.
           Kim and the assorted fur-kids (UK)





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • JpG
          Kim, i m glad you posted this. Our little April died of HCM due to saddle thrombosis. Sadly, she also had some other issues that we didn t know about such as
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 9 4:59 PM
            Kim,

            i'm glad you posted this.

            Our little April died of HCM due to saddle thrombosis. Sadly, she also had some other issues that we didn't know about such as eleveated liver enzymes, and possible diabetis. PLus she was overweight.

            The vet approached us within 30 minutes of looking her over (and before doing bloodwork, or Xrays) to suggest we euthanize her. We said no. We both decided to take a chance and see what happened. We were planning to put her on the bed at home and take care of her. She was always a fighter and we loved her so. Such a special kitty.

            Well she died the next day, just a few minutes after our last visit with her.

            Although she didnt make it, we wouldnt have known unless we took the chance.

            Thanks for sharing this. I am glad that Missi lived longer and you were able to cherish her time together.

            Joe
            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Kim Gregory <kimothygregory@...> wrote:
            >
            > To offer an example of a cat who did throw a saddle thrombosis and came through - my Missi threw a clot, she WAS in a lot of pain and the vet was pessimistic (sp?) and told me that she had never had a cat treated successfully.  I told her to try anyway - I suppose it helped that Missi had been healthy before this with only bronchitis diagnosed.  I think Missi  was treated with heparin, diuretics and of course pain meds.  She was totally paralysed in her back legs. 
            >
            > Missi was an oriental and they can be funny when kept in hospital but you never really know until you try - she was fine and the vet and nurses were fantastic they fawned over her and this was despite the fact that I was forever telling them what to do and what not to do.  Missi started to respond to treatment in the early hours of the morning following it happening.  She stayed in all weekend - the staff as I say couldnt have been better - they massaged her legs and slowly gradually Missi began to get partial use back in her legs, first one then the other.
            >
            > She was allowed home on the Monday - still very wobbly but her legs got stronger and stronger and she did recover full use of her legs.  Unfortunately as we know saddle thrombosis is nearly always related to heart disease and worse luck she turned out to have the most serious kind of heart problem - RCM. 
            >
            > Missi lived another 8 months and she did have several episodes of CHF but she had fantastic quality of live - she loved and revelled in every second she had left and this included the day she died.  She was a complete star and an inspiration to me and all who knew her.  Her vet a cardiologist adored her and says he learned so much from her about what cats can and can't tolerate. 
            >
            > I am honoured to have known her and I am humbled by how well she handled her illness.  I do think that sometimes vets are overly pessimistic and pass this on to owners - its one of these things if vets are overly reluctant to try to treat it then they will not see a good success rate which in turn will make them favour not treating...  Sometimes treatment is successful.
            >  Kim and the assorted fur-kids (UK)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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