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Re: [FH] Blood test

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  • Kristen G
    Hi -- My cat recently had bloodwork at the specialist.  It doesn t take long at all, they just took her back and drew the blood, maybe 5 minutes at the most,
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 4, 2009
      Hi -- My cat recently had bloodwork at the specialist.  It doesn't take long at all, they just took her back and drew the blood, maybe 5 minutes at the most, and then we went home.  We didn't have to see the vet or anything, they just called with the results.  They had clipped some hair on the lower part of her neck, so I assume that is where they took it.  I would suggest making the first appointment so you won't have to wait (which is what we did).  Just to be safe, you might want to ask them to spin the blood down before you leave to make sure everything is OK and they can do the test (Duffer's blood was hemolyzed the first time so we had to go back, which was not fun).  This takes around 15 minutes.

      My Duffer is a very easy going, not easily upset cat, but if you are worried about Sasha, maybe you could just try to stay with her?  Duffer was not upset at all by the experience. 

      Could you see if you can find a vet to come to your house and draw the blood and then you just run it by the cardiologist (I don't know if you would have to keep it cold or something)?  That would seem like the least stressful way. 

      Kristen




      ________________________________
      From: gill7penny <gill7penny@...>
      To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2009 9:48:41 AM
      Subject: [FH] Blood test

       
      Hi. I have had to book Sasha in at the vets for a blood test this Friday. The cardiologist wants the vets to check the potassium levels and other things. Can anyone tell me how blood is usually taken from a cat and how long it takes please? After our visit to the cardioligist where Sasha almost didn't make it I have put off having the blood test. But her breathing became quite fast again last week and she has had another injection of frusemide which seems to have got her back on track, but they are keen to do the blood tests just to check all the levels in case her frusemide tablets need to be increased.

      Thanks

      Gill and Sasha







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    • Jean
      Blood work is usually pretty quick - at my vet s I can just make a lab appointment for it. My heart kitty initially did ok with tests (his first echo and
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 4, 2009
        Blood work is usually pretty quick - at my vet's I can just make a lab
        appointment for it. My heart kitty initially did ok with tests (his first
        echo and initial bloodwork) until he started feeling so much better and
        having more energy from the pimobendan - then he would fight it. He's the
        most easy-going cat in the world, but they do have to restrain them to an
        extent for blood draws and echos, and THAT he started to fight. One thing
        that I was really glad my primary vet did that time was to go back and tell
        the techs to give him a break to chill out and relax before trying again, to
        be as quick as possible, and that in her opinion it wasn't worth getting the
        blood if it looked like it would destablize him. So that's something to
        maybe consider when you go - make sure whoever is taking the blood knows
        that Sasha is fragile, to be as quick as possible, and that if she gets
        stressed to either take a break or stop altogether.

        I'm guessing that they want to check blood levels before potentially upping
        the lasix to make sure that her kidneys are handling it ok? I empathize with
        putting it off - after his last bad blood draw and then totally destablizing
        fighting restraint during his follow-up echo, he was given orders to not
        have any more checkups, and all meds would be adjusted just based on how he
        seemed to be feeling since it wasn't worth the risk of destabilization. The
        blood draw is generally quick, but you can always tell them that you're not
        interested if it seems like it's going south - and then either way keep an
        eye on her and her breathing at home for the next few days.

        I think Kristen mentioned the possibility of having someone draw the blood
        at home - if that's feasible, it would probably be the least-stressful way
        to get the blood sample. I was surprised to find out that my primary vet
        practice does do home visits (it never occurred to me before hearing about
        them on this list), but they do cost significantly more.

        I'm glad the injection seems to have helped her - hopefully everything will
        go well on Friday, it should be a quick trip. But if it does seem to stress
        her out too much, or she starts wheezing while there (what happened to
        Patches during his echo - he was on increased lasix doses at home for a few
        days and did manage to stay out of the hospital), it probably isn't worth
        continuing for the sample. Patches' blood draw (maybe two weeks before the
        echo) went pretty poorly, and they were concerned and advised me to keep a
        close eye on his breathing for a few days, but he was fine as soon as it was
        over and didn't have any problems - I think it was the more extended
        restraint for the echo that pushed him over the edge, whereas the blood draw
        was completed much faster. So hopefully things will go smoothly!

        Good luck!
        Jean


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