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Re: August 30, 2000 - May 30, 2007

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  • jintzr
    Oh my gosh Nala- that was just heartbreaking. It was so sad that when I read it (I am at work), I actually had to run to the bathroom and cry!! It goes right
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2009
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      Oh my gosh Nala- that was just heartbreaking. It was so sad that when I read it (I am at work), I actually had to run to the bathroom and cry!! It goes right to the heart.

      It's just so touching because it's what all of us here feel- the ups and downs, the uncertainty, the worries, the good days, the bad days, the joy, the pain, the vets, the medications, the happiness they bring, and the horrible grip of fear of losing them.

      I lost Ren to HCM in August of last year. Thank you for sharing this about Cozette. They are so precious to us.

      Cozette, send a sunshine hug down to your Mom today. She misses you dearly and sends her love.

      Hugs~
      Donna



      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, nala nala <nala_zq@...> wrote:
      >
      > Two years ago today I lost my wild kitty girl.
      > Her exuberance, her curiosity, her vivacity
      > now gone.
      >
      >
      > "A rapid heartbeat," he said.  "A high strung cat."
      > "But nothing concerning."
      >
      >
      > "A rapid heartbeat," she said.  "A nervous cat."
      > "Do not be alarmed."
      >
      >
      > "A murmur," he said. "Does she play, is she active?"
      > "Oh very much so," I said, "she dances and twirls."
      >   
      > "A murmur," he concluded.
      > "But nothing concerning."
      >
      >
      > "A murmur," she said.  "Does she need rest, is she tired?"
      > "Oh, not at all," I said, "she flies on the ground with leaps and bounds."
      >  
      > "A murmur," she concluded.
      > "Do not be alarmed."
      >
      >
      > "Mild concentric hypertrophy, enlarged papillary muscles,
      > left ventricular outflow tract obstruction," she said.  "Does
      > she play, is she active?  Does she need rest, is she tired."
      >
      >
      > "Oh, not at all," I said, "She plays with her sister, and 
      > chases the moths and the birds."
      >
      >
      > "A textbook case," she concluded.  
      > "Early stages, but certainly concerning."
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
      > "She doesn't play, she isn't active," I stated.
      > "It's quite alarming."
      >
      >
      > Another echo, another exam
      > "It is unusual for a case to progress so rapidly," she said.
      > Another radiograph - she climbs up my torso to get away.
      > "We will start diuretics"
      >
      >
      > Another echo, another exam
      > "I've never seen a case progress so rapidly."
      > Another radiograph - she climbs up my torso to get away.
      > "Look at her breathing!" I said.  "I've never seen this before!"
      > "No EKG!  Lasix IM, STAT!"   She said.
      >
      >
      > She quit eating.  
      > She quit drinking. 
      > She has no interest in life. 
      > Fingertips slathered in food
      > Syringes filled with sustenance.
      >
      >
      > The vet consults the cardiologist.
      > Try to reverse the prerenal azotemia.  
      > Ooops, too much fluid!  Severe CHF.
      >
      >
      > She perks up and purrs at my visits.  
      > "She still wants to live" I said.
      >
      >
      > 3 days of oxygen with slow IV drips.
      > Constant infusions of lasix and reglan and ifs.
      > "She's getting fractious and hard to control"
      > "Good!" I said.  "Perhaps it's time for us to go."
      >
      >
      > Now she is home, but won't eat and won't drink.
      > I decide on an e-tube, I can't really think.
      >
      >
      > It's been two months and then three and then four.
      > We made it to the sixth month, but then no more.
      > She ran to the window, cried out, and collapsed on the floor.
      >
      >
      > I held her in my arms. She drew her last breath.
      > I cried out, still holding her, and collapsed on the floor.
      >
      >
      > May 30, 2007
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Linda Irrgang
      Nala, My heart goes out to you. They bring us such joy and when they go it s the hardest thing in life. What would Cozette want for you? Happiness and the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 1, 2009
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        Nala,



        My heart goes out to you. They bring us such joy and when they go it's the
        hardest thing in life. What would Cozette want for you? Happiness and the
        anticipation of the greatest moment when you will be reunited.



        White lite for you and Angel Cozette.



        Linda

        _____

        From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of jintzr
        Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 10:33 AM
        To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [FH] Re: August 30, 2000 - May 30, 2007








        Oh my gosh Nala- that was just heartbreaking. It was so sad that when I read
        it (I am at work), I actually had to run to the bathroom and cry!! It goes
        right to the heart.

        It's just so touching because it's what all of us here feel- the ups and
        downs, the uncertainty, the worries, the good days, the bad days, the joy,
        the pain, the vets, the medications, the happiness they bring, and the
        horrible grip of fear of losing them.

        I lost Ren to HCM in August of last year. Thank you for sharing this about
        Cozette. They are so precious to us.

        Cozette, send a sunshine hug down to your Mom today. She misses you dearly
        and sends her love.

        Hugs~
        Donna

        --- In feline-heart@ <mailto:feline-heart%40yahoogroups.com>
        yahoogroups.com, nala nala <nala_zq@...> wrote:
        >
        > Two years ago today I lost my wild kitty girl.
        > Her exuberance, her curiosity, her vivacity
        > now gone.
        >
        >
        > "A rapid heartbeat," he said. "A high strung cat."
        > "But nothing concerning."
        >
        >
        > "A rapid heartbeat," she said. "A nervous cat."
        > "Do not be alarmed."
        >
        >
        > "A murmur," he said. "Does she play, is she active?"
        > "Oh very much so," I said, "she dances and twirls."
        >
        > "A murmur," he concluded.
        > "But nothing concerning."
        >
        >
        > "A murmur," she said. "Does she need rest, is she tired?"
        > "Oh, not at all," I said, "she flies on the ground with leaps and bounds."
        >
        > "A murmur," she concluded.
        > "Do not be alarmed."
        >
        >
        > "Mild concentric hypertrophy, enlarged papillary muscles,
        > left ventricular outflow tract obstruction," she said. "Does
        > she play, is she active? Does she need rest, is she tired."
        >
        >
        > "Oh, not at all," I said, "She plays with her sister, and
        > chases the moths and the birds."
        >
        >
        > "A textbook case," she concluded.
        > "Early stages, but certainly concerning."
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------------------------------
        >
        >
        > "She doesn't play, she isn't active," I stated.
        > "It's quite alarming."
        >
        >
        > Another echo, another exam
        > "It is unusual for a case to progress so rapidly," she said.
        > Another radiograph - she climbs up my torso to get away.
        > "We will start diuretics"
        >
        >
        > Another echo, another exam
        > "I've never seen a case progress so rapidly."
        > Another radiograph - she climbs up my torso to get away.
        > "Look at her breathing!" I said. "I've never seen this before!"
        > "No EKG! Lasix IM, STAT!" She said.
        >
        >
        > She quit eating.
        > She quit drinking.
        > She has no interest in life.
        > Fingertips slathered in food
        > Syringes filled with sustenance.
        >
        >
        > The vet consults the cardiologist.
        > Try to reverse the prerenal azotemia.
        > Ooops, too much fluid! Severe CHF.
        >
        >
        > She perks up and purrs at my visits.
        > "She still wants to live" I said.
        >
        >
        > 3 days of oxygen with slow IV drips.
        > Constant infusions of lasix and reglan and ifs.
        > "She's getting fractious and hard to control"
        > "Good!" I said. "Perhaps it's time for us to go."
        >
        >
        > Now she is home, but won't eat and won't drink.
        > I decide on an e-tube, I can't really think.
        >
        >
        > It's been two months and then three and then four.
        > We made it to the sixth month, but then no more.
        > She ran to the window, cried out, and collapsed on the floor.
        >
        >
        > I held her in my arms. She drew her last breath.
        > I cried out, still holding her, and collapsed on the floor.
        >
        >
        > May 30, 2007
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gretchen
        Nala, My heart ached as I read this. I am so sorry for your loss. Gretchen
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 2, 2009
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          Nala,
          My heart ached as I read this. I am so sorry for your loss.
          Gretchen

          --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, nala nala <nala_zq@...> wrote:
          >
          > Two years ago today I lost my wild kitty girl.
          > Her exuberance, her curiosity, her vivacity
          > now gone.
          >
          >
          > "A rapid heartbeat," he said.  "A high strung cat."
          > "But nothing concerning."
          >
          >
          > "A rapid heartbeat," she said.  "A nervous cat."
          > "Do not be alarmed."
          >
          >
          > "A murmur," he said. "Does she play, is she active?"
          > "Oh very much so," I said, "she dances and twirls."
          >   
          > "A murmur," he concluded.
          > "But nothing concerning."
          >
          >
          > "A murmur," she said.  "Does she need rest, is she tired?"
          > "Oh, not at all," I said, "she flies on the ground with leaps and bounds."
          >  
          > "A murmur," she concluded.
          > "Do not be alarmed."
          >
          >
          > "Mild concentric hypertrophy, enlarged papillary muscles,
          > left ventricular outflow tract obstruction," she said.  "Does
          > she play, is she active?  Does she need rest, is she tired."
          >
          >
          > "Oh, not at all," I said, "She plays with her sister, and 
          > chases the moths and the birds."
          >
          >
          > "A textbook case," she concluded.  
          > "Early stages, but certainly concerning."
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------------------------------
          >
          >
          > "She doesn't play, she isn't active," I stated.
          > "It's quite alarming."
          >
          >
          > Another echo, another exam
          > "It is unusual for a case to progress so rapidly," she said.
          > Another radiograph - she climbs up my torso to get away.
          > "We will start diuretics"
          >
          >
          > Another echo, another exam
          > "I've never seen a case progress so rapidly."
          > Another radiograph - she climbs up my torso to get away.
          > "Look at her breathing!" I said.  "I've never seen this before!"
          > "No EKG!  Lasix IM, STAT!"   She said.
          >
          >
          > She quit eating.  
          > She quit drinking. 
          > She has no interest in life. 
          > Fingertips slathered in food
          > Syringes filled with sustenance.
          >
          >
          > The vet consults the cardiologist.
          > Try to reverse the prerenal azotemia.  
          > Ooops, too much fluid!  Severe CHF.
          >
          >
          > She perks up and purrs at my visits.  
          > "She still wants to live" I said.
          >
          >
          > 3 days of oxygen with slow IV drips.
          > Constant infusions of lasix and reglan and ifs.
          > "She's getting fractious and hard to control"
          > "Good!" I said.  "Perhaps it's time for us to go."
          >
          >
          > Now she is home, but won't eat and won't drink.
          > I decide on an e-tube, I can't really think.
          >
          >
          > It's been two months and then three and then four.
          > We made it to the sixth month, but then no more.
          > She ran to the window, cried out, and collapsed on the floor.
          >
          >
          > I held her in my arms. She drew her last breath.
          > I cried out, still holding her, and collapsed on the floor.
          >
          >
          > May 30, 2007
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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