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Re: Major Fluid Retention

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  • jintzr
    Andie- When lasix was no longer removing the fluid enough for my cat, they added Spirolactone. See below link below, and I pasted the part about spirolactone.
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 9, 2009
      Andie- When lasix was no longer removing the fluid enough for my cat, they added Spirolactone. See below link below, and I pasted the part about spirolactone.

      http://www.2ndchance.info/cardiomyopathy-cat.htm

      Spirolactone (Aldactone)
      When the maximum dose of furosemide diuretic ( 0.5-1.5mg/ pound every 8-12 hrs) is not sufficient to eliminate fluid buildup in the tummy (ascites) and lungs (pulmonary edema) of your pet, another diuretic, such as spirolactone, can be added to the medications your pet receives. You need to be patient - it takes 2-4 days for the full effect of the drug to be reached. Spirolactone can increase the toxicity and effect of digoxin so your pet's digitoxin dose may need to be lowered. It can also cause an increase in serum potassium, which can be dangerous. To monitor potassium, a blood sample should be taken and measured for serum electrolytes and kidney function on the 3rd or 4th day, the 7th day and periodically there after.



      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carolroars@...> wrote:
      >
      > hi Andie,
      >
      > What's happening is called ascities. It's fluid accumulation in the abdomen that can be caused from a number of things, including heart failure. Here's more info about it. There are 3 pages to this link, so when you read down to the bottom of the page, click to go to the next.
      > http://www.petplace.com/cats/ascites-in-cats/page1.aspx
      >
      > What you can do is have the vet draw off the fluid, like they do with it when it's in the lungs. I'm not sure how serious a procedure that is, whether they'd have to sedate or not to do it.
      >
      > If there's another cause of it besides heart stuff, it'd be good to check that out with your vet. Maybe it's something that can be treated and has nothing to do with his heart. It's important to find out what's causing the ascities, before they can attempt any kind of treatment.
      >
      > For me...if my cat had it and was acting normal, well, as normal as can be, and was feeling okay and eating... I'm not sure I'd do anything unless they went into some kind of distress.
      >
      > You know...vets always say this many or that many weeks left... I don't buy that. With the things we do for our kitties, with supplements and care and lots of love, many of them defy anything that the vets say as far as "how long" they have. I try not to think about the "how long" part that they say, and try to live each day with Snowball as best we can. It's not easy sometimes, and I do find my mind creeping into the "dread" mode, but I always try to not think that way. I know they can pick up on my thoughts, so I try to keep the thoughts "healthy" as much as I can.
      >
      > hugs,
      > Carol and Snowball and the gang
      >
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