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Re: Petuly's new blood work doesn't look too good!

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  • Carol
    hi Thelma, First thing that I would change and see if it makes any difference with her kidney and liver values is stop the Miralax. I used to give it to Chris
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 5, 2008
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      hi Thelma,

      First thing that I would change and see if it makes any difference
      with her kidney and liver values is stop the Miralax. I used to
      give it to Chris last summer, but then found out it's very damaging
      to the kidneys and liver. All the warnings say that it's
      contraindicated in patients with kidney and liver disease. I can't
      find any information on why though, only that it's not supposed to
      be used if you have kidney/liver issues.

      I would try another type of laxative. Senna (herb) is good, we used
      to use that on our angel Ducky. You might also try Benefiber. It
      used to be made from guar gum, but they changed it to wheat fiber,
      which I know isn't great either, but the lesser of two evils, ya
      know! We give Benefiber to our Puddy, because he has rectal
      prolapse, and any constipation makes him prolapse, so we have to
      keep things moving for him.

      Phosphorus binders can inhibit the absorption of some medications,
      so it's best to give the meds an hour apart from the binders. You'd
      give the binders with food, say the main meals, so give the binders
      with the main meals and the meds with a tiny bit of food (so not to
      upset the tummy) w/o the binders at least an hour away from the food
      with the binders in it. Since Petruly has high calcium levels, a
      calcium based binder wouldn't be appropriate for her. I'd go with
      something like the aluminum hydroxide instead.

      Denamarin is a combination of s-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) and milk
      thistle extract, and from what I've read, it's safe for CRF kitties.
      I used to give SAMe it to my angels Fritzy and Sweetie. The only
      thing about it is that it should be given on an empty stomach,
      and "sometimes" it can cause tummy upset. In all the literature
      about Denamarin that I found today it says there are no side
      effects, but I know from experience when giving SAMe to my guys in
      the past, that it did cause upset tummy in Fritzy. Here's some info
      from the manufacturer that I found.
      http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/products/animal/denamarin/index.asp
      http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/products/animal/denamarin/denamarin_faq.a
      sp
      or if the long links don't work:
      http://tinyurl.com/3emagv
      http://tinyurl.com/4bq6ju


      >>
      Cholesterol*: 167, 293 (77 - 258) - Is this because of the organ
      meat?
      >>

      No...high cholesterol in cats can be an after effect from the kidney
      disease. http://www.pets.ca/articles/article-labtests.htm

      "Cholesterol is a form of fat. Cholesterol can be increased in the
      bloodstream for many reasons in dogs. It is much less common for
      cats to have increased cholesterol. Some of the diseases that cause
      elevated cholesterol are hypothyroidism, Cushing's disease, diabetes
      and kidney diseases that cause protein to be lost in the urine. High
      cholesterol does not predispose dogs and cats to heart and blood
      vessel disease as it does in people."

      >>
      Amylase: 1286, 1454 (496 - 1874) - Does this mean pancreatitis?
      >>

      Elevated Amylase can be a sign of pancreatitis in dogs, but not
      always, and usually not in cats. More typically it's common in cats
      with kidney disease.

      http://www.manhattancats.com/Articles/pancreatitis_test.html
      "Also, these enzymes are excreted by the kidney, and the presence of
      concurrent kidney disease (which is fairly common in cats) can
      falsely elevate the serum amylase and lipase levels."

      >>
      BUN*: 44, 46 (15 - 32)
      Creatinine*: 2.4, 3.0 (0.9 - 2.1)
      Phosphorus*: 4.5, 5.8 (3.0 - 6.3)
      Calcium*: 10.2, 11.8 (8.9 - 11.5)
      Potassium: 5.1, 4.4 (3.6 - 5.4)
      Alk. phos.*: 66, 99 (10 - 72)
      ALT*: 311, 656 (29 - 145)
      AST*: 105, 211 (12 - 42)
      >>

      Though her BUN and Creatinine are a little high, they're not
      horrible. Her Phos is just slightly above what folks would like it
      to be before starting phos binders. On the CRF groups I'm on, they
      say anything above 5.0 then start binders, but 5.8 isn't that bad.
      You could probaby get away with minimal use of the phos binders to
      bring that down a little.

      Hopefully on the Denamarin, those liver values will come down.
      Another supplement that is very helpful in treating liver disease is
      artichoke extract. It helps with the elimination of the toxins from
      detoxing the liver.

      >>
      Comment on 4/3/08: Sample slightly hemolyzed (this sounds bad! What
      can it be?)

      Hematocrit: 30, 29 (31 - 46)
      >>

      Hemolyzed blood can be caused from improper taking and prep of the
      sample, or it can have something to do with anemia. Since Petruly is
      a little anemic, I'd keep an eye on that. Doing B12 shots could
      help, and possibly if it gets too low, Epogen injections to bring
      the hematocrit back up.
      http://www.bd.com/vacutainer/pdfs/techtalk/TechTalk_Jan2004_VS7167.pd
      f or http://tinyurl.com/69xtz2 for info about hemolyzed blood.

      >>
      About the thyroid the doctor said that in the case of a CRF kitty
      they prefer not to treat the thyroid as it may actually help the
      kidneys.
      >>

      You know...I've been told this too, and we left Snowball's hyperT
      untreated for almost a year, and it was bad for her. Since we
      started her on the thyroid med (Tapazole/methimazole), her kidney
      values haven't gotten worse, and her thyroid is now normal...for now
      anyway. Having hyperthyroid is very bad for the heart and every
      other organ. I would maybe try to treat the thyroid very
      cautiously, using very small doses of the med and see how Petruly
      does. You can always stop it if it makes things worse. We give
      Snowball the transdermal cream, because the medication usually
      causes nausea and vomiting in cats, and with Snowball's spewing
      problems, we didn't even want to go there. We use just a tiny dose
      on her and it's so far helping. It's been about 5 weeks on it now,
      and we did bloodwork on her after 3 weeks on it and her kidney
      values were not any worse on the thyroid meds.

      I hope some of this helps, and that some of the other folks can
      chime in with more info for you.

      Hang in there.

      hugs,
      Carol and Snowball and the gang
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