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Re: Help - Newly diagnosed restrictive cardiomyopathy

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  • nala_zq
    Dear Dawn, I am sorry to learn about Cat. Did she see a veterinary cardiologist or internist who performed an echocardiogram? Is she in heart failure and if
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 2, 2007
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      Dear Dawn,

      I am sorry to learn about Cat.

      Did she see a veterinary cardiologist or internist
      who performed an echocardiogram? Is she
      in heart failure and if so, is she taking any
      medicine? Which ones? Normally a cat
      in heart failure will be given lasix to help
      prevent the fluid accumulation that
      accompanies heart failure. Many times
      if the fluid is reduced, the cat will become
      more active.

      RCM cats are also at risk for blood clots
      and are usually put on a med like
      aspirin, plavix, low molecular weight
      heparin or the over-the-counter supplement,
      nattokinase.

      Leah's cat Alex had RCM and I am sure she
      will tell you what all she did for her heart
      kitty. Kimberly's Q-tip also had RCM and
      she might also chime in. Both kitties
      outlived their vet's prognosis.

      Eating constantly can be a sign of hyperthyroidism,
      especially when combined with weight loss.
      Heart disease can also contribute to muscle
      wasting and weight loss.

      Many here give their kitties supplements such
      as taurine, carnitine, fish oil and coenzymeQ10.
      I am sure Leah can tell you more about that
      if you are interested

      My cat had a different heart disease, but
      I tried to treat her as normally as possible.
      It helped us both.

      Best,

      Nala




      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Dawn Jarocki" <fairweathersurfer@...> wrote:
      >
      > Our cat, Cat, was just diagnosed with restrictive cardiomyopathy. The
      > vet said it was severly advanced and gave her "weeks to months" to live.
      > We have brought her home and although she seems happy to be home she
      > is much more lethargic and very thin. Plus she is eating almost
      > constantly and I have not seen her use the restroom in the past 15
      > hours (both of these are unusual for her.)
      > We really want her to enjoy whatever time she has left (hopefully more
      > than less). I think my husband and I are both so afraid to break her
      > that we are tip-toeing around her, speaking hardly in a whisper and
      > neither of us have been able to sleep. In fact, last night when she
      > decided not to move from her spot on the livingroom floor, we both
      > climbed out of bed individually and set up our own make-shift beds
      > around her. I think maybe she can't jump anymore because where she
      > used to jump now she just looks up and then looks at me. Should I lift
      > her up? Will jumping up or down, or walking up stairs, hurt her?
      >
      > Cat is really the heart of our relationship. We owe her at least half
      > the love she has shown us (cuddling with us when we were in pain or
      > sad, sleeping curled around my head on nights when I was stressed from
      > school, following my husband around giving him cat kisses and watching
      > after him as if he were her kitten.)
      >
      > Can anyone offer us advice on what to expect and how we can make her
      > last days more joyful and more in number?
      >
    • elfinmyst@aol.com
      Hi Dawn I am also sorry to hear about Cat. A lot of cats here were given weeks/months to live and outlived their diagnosis. My own Trixi was given two months
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 3, 2007
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        Hi Dawn

        I am also sorry to hear about Cat. A lot of cats here were given
        weeks/months to live and outlived their diagnosis. My own Trixi was given two months
        when she was only 3 months old, and she just past her first birthday. I put that
        down to the treatment and the supplements.

        What treatment is Cat on and how old is she? Did she having a thyroid test,
        as like Nala says, hyperthyroidism causes excess eating, weight loss and also
        contributes to heart disease. Some cats go into a 'heart remission' if the
        thyroid is treated and the heart conditions improves. If you haven't had this
        test, please consider it. It's just a blood test.

        My thoughts and prayers are with you and your newly diagnosed kitty.

        Lyn

        www.furkids-uk.com






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Janie
        Im sorry about Cat. BUT I have had three cats now to have this and they were given less than a year. One went 5. So throw that out of your head. Next the issue
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 3, 2007
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          Im sorry about Cat. BUT I have had three cats now to have this and they
          were given less than a year. One went 5. So throw that out of your
          head. Next the issue you have of hurting her I had with my little
          Trampster. She was 6 pounds in her healthy state a little fisty runt
          who could take on the biggest cat. She was told she had this at 13 yrs
          old. I put her on antenole and 1/4 baby asprin ea three days. I later
          dropped the asprin as it made her sick. We did take the heart pill ea
          day and she lived to be 17 and it did get her in the end. I was very
          lucky. My usband was so afraid to pick her up as she was down to 4
          pounds. I put steps for her. She was such an active cat tell the last
          two weeks and still she tried to do it all her self. Lucky for me she
          always wanted me to be with her up to the end. I took the plastic
          containers you store things in and filled them with stuff and she could
          climb in bed I put a pillow on them a real flat one. I made sure she
          could get in her favorite places and a little help she didnt know I put
          it for her. I dont know how sick your Kitty is but it sounds if your
          vet has not given her meds. Cat will need some meds if your vet cant
          do it you need to try to find a specialist who will do and ultra sound
          and get Cat on something to help. It may or may not be to late but she
          may not be eating as of fluid build up in that case Cat needs lasix or
          she just may be weak and the beta blockers help. Good luck its hard but
          there is meds and they all dont die that fast. Mine lived a full life
          tell the end. I had three I went through and this group will keep you
          informed more than the vet. Janie
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