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Respiration and blood pressure monitoring

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  • helen stone
    Dear All, I m sorry to post again, we re on a bit of an uphill climb at the moment and I appreciate there may well not be any answers to my questions but, any
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 2, 2007
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      Dear All,
      I'm sorry to post again, we're on a bit of an uphill climb at the moment and I appreciate there may well not be any answers to my questions but, any thoughts would be appreciated.
      My main worry is Annas breathing, still. She's always had a tendency to abdominal breathing at times (?hyperT related) But, In the last 3 or 4 weeks her flanks are working like bellows, there is a significant almost suction type of sharp mechanical resp going on and it seems to be her lower abdominal muscles now, previously It's been noticeable in her mid abdo region . Her rate is steady between 20 when she sleeps and 28 when she is up and about. Her CXR was apparently clear two weeks ago when her breathing was at its worst.( I do have inhalers to try at some point, they say not yet) It might be worth mentioning also that I feel she is a little dry too, can this affect their breathing at all?
      I'm just increasingly concerned that she wont be able to keep this up for long and just wonder if anyone has come across this type of breathing before? and what may be causing it. Maybe she needa an ace? it seemed to stop her lying in the respiratory position to sleep when she was on benazipril last year, but, she ultimately collapsed on that particular drug.
      If anyone also knows of a means of equipment by which I could measure her Bp at home I'd really love to hear, I'm a nursing sister so technique shouldnt be an issue! but, finding some kind of equipment to do it is. My vets have not been able to do this thru her stress and their fear of her resp status, It's a bit of a catch 22. Her Bp in fact has never been measured and I am extremely concerned (given her reaction to amlodipine.)
      Well, thanks to everyone again for reading another long tome from me, I so hope to be able to post some better news soon
      Much love
      Helen





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    • SThoyre
      Helen, I purchased a BP vet doppler unit which I ve used for 2 yrs. The biggest downside is that the units are pricey ($800-$1000 US). The one I purchased is
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2007
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        Helen,
        I purchased a BP vet doppler unit which I've used for 2 yrs. The biggest downside is that the units are pricey ($800-$1000 US). The one I purchased is from vmed tech:
        http://www.vmedtech.com/Vet-Dop.htm

        They normally just sell to vets, but they have sold a few to non-vets and don't need an rx or anything. All of our vets have been very supportive of us monitoring BP at home -- first for Aus, for whom we were told initially was too fractious at the vet to get anything resembling an accurate reading (turns out, we just had to find a kinder, more gentle vet he could trust), then also for Ariel. In fact, during this lastest crisis w Ariel, our internist was having us monitor her BP several times/day and now, after her taps and increased lasix, wants me to do it every other day as he is very concerned about her becoming hypotensive.

        I have no idea if you have a budget that can even think about such a thing, but I've been very grateful to have the BP equip here at home for the past 2 yrs and have more than made my money back on all the vet visits we didn't have to go to just to check BP, let alone the cost of the BP checks themselves.

        Do you think your vet might let you borrow or rent the office BP machine? I know of a lady here whose vet lets her borrow it overnight sometimes to check on her kitty's BP (he's been hard to regulate BP wise).

        If you do end up getting one and want any tips on how to use the thing (it's not hard, but there are tips/tricks to ensure a more reliable result), I'd be happy to share any info I have with you.

        Also, re the bellows-like breathing... my Ariel has done that from time to time when her allergies are acting up (she has inhalant allergies). She is a Scottish Fold, so her nasal airways are on the small side anyway. When she gets a stuffy head, she really has to pull in hard to get the air, but like Anna, her respirations are normal (17-21). At that point, we know to either put her back on her antihistamine, or if she's already on it, to increase the dose. She does not have asthma. I have no idea if this is even a possibility for Anna, but thought I'd mention is just in case.

        Hugs to Anna.
        Stacey

        helen stone <beingtherealways@...> wrote:
        <snip>
        My main worry is Annas breathing, still. She's always had a tendency to abdominal breathing at times (?hyperT related) But, In the last 3 or 4 weeks her flanks are working like bellows, there is a significant almost suction type of sharp mechanical resp going on and it seems to be her lower abdominal muscles now, previously It's been noticeable in her mid abdo region . Her rate is steady between 20 when she sleeps and 28 when she is up and about. Her CXR was apparently clear two weeks ago when her breathing was at its worst.( I do have inhalers to try at some point, they say not yet) It might be worth mentioning also that I feel she is a little dry too, can this affect their breathing at all?<snip>
        If anyone also knows of a means of equipment by which I could measure her Bp at home <snip>



        .





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • moonpye
        Hi Helen, This is the bp machine my vet has - very quiet - very expensive...on my wish list.. http://www.petmap.com/ Hugs, Candace ... [Non-text portions of
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2007
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          Hi Helen,
          This is the bp machine my vet has - very quiet - very expensive...on my wish
          list..
          http://www.petmap.com/


          Hugs,
          Candace



          On 7/2/07, helen stone <beingtherealways@...> wrote:
          >
          > If anyone also knows of a means of equipment by which I could measure her
          > Bp at home I'd really love to hear, I'm a nursing sister so technique
          > shouldnt be an issue! but, finding some kind of equipment to do it is. My
          > vets have not been able to do this thru her stress and their fear of her
          > resp status, It's a bit of a catch 22. Her Bp in fact has never been
          > measured and I am extremely concerned (given her reaction to amlodipine.)
          > Much love
          > Helen
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carol
          Hi Helen, Anna s breathing reps are in a good place with between 20 and 28, maybe just a teeny bit high for a heart kitty. I like to see the breaths 24 or
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 2, 2007
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            Hi Helen,

            Anna's breathing reps are in a good place with between 20 and 28,
            maybe just a teeny bit high for a heart kitty. I like to see the
            breaths 24 or below, but 28's not too bad. I always worry when they
            get into the abdominal breathing too. I feel like they're working
            too hard for the breaths when they breathe down there.

            >>
            It might be worth mentioning also that I feel she is a little dry
            too, can this affect their breathing at all?
            >>

            Yes, in my experience with crf kitties, when they're dehydrated they
            tend to breathe harder too. My angel Sweetie who was crf/chf, when
            she was just crf, 3 years before her heart problems began, at times
            would breathe hard when she was dehydrated.

            I've also noticed with Chris now, that sometimes he will breathe
            harder and lower right after eating and drinking. He gets tired
            from the effort of eating/drinking and his respiration will go up
            for a bit for a while afterwards.

            >>
            If anyone also knows of a means of equipment by which I could
            measure her Bp at home I'd really love to hear,
            >>

            A Doppler Ultrasonic Flow Detector machine is what you use to
            measure BP on a cat or dog. I bought one like this (Model 811-B)
            from Parks Medical in the US.
            http://www.parksmed.com/products/?page=3.php
            They're expensive. With all the accessories, it comes to about $800.

            You're vet would have to order it for you, because they won't sell
            to individuals. You need the machine, probes (infant flat ones),
            cuffs, gel and a Sphygmomanometer. Here's the page with the prices
            and explanation of the accessories.
            http://www.parksmed.com/vet_prices.php If you go down to the middle
            of this page, there is a link that says "Blood Pressure Measurements
            on Animals".

            Here's another site that talks about BP too.
            http://www.petplace.com/cats/blood-pressure-in-cats/page1.aspx

            This site has good pictures of using the doppler machine.
            http://lbah.com/feline/hypertension.htm

            It's not difficult to take a BP with the doppler machine. You just
            shave a tiny spot on the back of one of their legs, just above their
            feet, or around the very base of the underside of the tail. You put
            the cuff just above where you shaved on the leg or tail and the spot
            where you shaved is where you put the infant probe. You put the gel
            on the probe and press that against the shaved area. You listen for
            the heartbeat/pulse, and when you hear it and have the probe
            positioned properly so you can keep hearing it, then you take the
            Sphygmomanometer (the thing with the bulb that you pump) and pump it
            until the meter on the Sphygmomanometer goes above about 250. Then
            you listen while the Sphygmomanometer lets out the air. You won't
            hear the heartbeat/pulse until it gets to the point where it can
            read the BP. You want the BP below 160, but I think closer to being
            below about 140 is better. At 160 they usually start BP meds.

            >>
            Well, thanks to everyone again for reading another long tome from
            me, I so hope to be able to post some better news soon
            >>

            I'll keep you and Ann in my prayers.

            love,
            Carol, Marcia and Chris, Puddy Boo Punkie MeanMama Misty Snowball
            and Chelsea
            (angels Fritzy Sweetie Ducky Bouncer and Muffy)

            "I know you're there...a breath away's not far to where you are."
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