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Financial Assistance

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  • vanillalotus
    Just on Sunday my cat was diagnosed with Chronic Heart Failure. Everyday since then she has either been to the hospital or feline clinic. I have gotten the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 2 8:24 AM
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      Just on Sunday my cat was diagnosed with Chronic Heart Failure.
      Everyday since then she has either been to the hospital or feline
      clinic. I have gotten the credit card to help with the sudden
      expenses, they only gave me an 1000 limit. But over the past 2 days I
      am on the brink of using that all up. I'm fearful that in the next few
      days if this constant need to go to the hospital keeps up me and my
      husband will be poor and no longer able to help her or feed/house
      ourselves. Is ther anything that i can do to aquire more money to see
      if my cat has a fighting chance of making it through her heart
      disease. It's really starting to get the point that we are considering
      euthanising her if she requires another hospital visit. I don't want
      to euthanise her but i don't want to be broke either. Help me PLEASE.
    • moonpye
      Maybe this can help you and your kitty: IMOM [www.imom.org] Mission Statement: Helping people help pets. To better the lives of sick, injured and abused
      Message 2 of 5 , May 2 8:38 AM
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        Maybe this can help you and your kitty:

        IMOM
        [www.imom.org]
        "Mission Statement: Helping people help pets. To better the lives of
        sick, injured and abused companion animals. We are dedicated to
        insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because
        their caretaker is financially challenged." (Note: IMOM has a special
        fund for diabetic cats)

        American Animal Hospital Association
        [www.aahahelpingpets.org]
        "The heartbreak happens all too often? A pet owner is unable to
        afford treatment and their sick or injured companion animal pays the
        price. If the owner is elderly, disabled or on a fixed income, the
        cost of care may be too much of a stretch for their pocketbook.
        Perhaps they have been victimized by crime, property loss or a job
        layoff and are experiencing a temporary financial hardship? Making it
        too difficult to afford pet care. And some animals, brought to
        clinics by Good Samaritans, don't have an owner to pay for treatment.
        Whatever the situation, the fact remains the same: When sick or
        injured animals are unable to receive veterinary care, they suffer.
        Through the AAHA Helping Pets Fund, veterinary care is possible for
        sick or injured pets even if they have been abandoned or if their
        owner is experiencing financial hardship."

        Angels 4 Animals
        [ www.angels4animals.org ]
        "Angels4Animals, a non-profit organization and a program of Inner
        Voice Community Services, has a mission to serve as the guardian
        angel of animals whose caretakers find themselves in difficult
        financial situations. At Angels4Animals we believe that animal owners
        should not have to say goodbye to the animals that they love. Our
        work is accomplished in conjunction with veterinary clinics across
        the country, eager to assist as many animals, and their owners, as
        possible. Our services range from financial aid to complete treatment
        to those pets and pet owners in need."

        Care Credit
        [www.carecredit.com]
        A credit card company for health care, including veterinary
        care. "Care Credit, the leader in patient/client financing, has
        helped more than 3 million patients/clients get the treatment or
        procedures they needed and wanted. With a comprehensive range of plan
        options, for treatment or procedure fees from $1 to over $25,000, we
        offer a plan and a low monthly payment to fit comfortably into almost
        every budget."

        Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP)
        [www.fveap.org]
        "The NEED & The HELP: Seniors, People with disabilities, People who
        have lost their job, Good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten - any
        of these folks may need financial assistance to save a beloved
        companion." The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a
        nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization that provides financial assistance
        to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary
        services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or
        injury strikes.

        Help-A-Pet
        [ www.help-a-pet.org]
        "Our efforts focus on serving the elderly, the disabled, and the
        working poor. For lonely seniors, physically/mentally challenged
        individuals and children of working parents, pets represent much more
        than a diversion."

        Shakespeare Animal Fund
        [ www.shakespeareanimalfund.com]
        "Anyone can apply for funds, but SAF offers assistance primarily to
        those on fixed incomes or with annual incomes below $35,000.
        Exceptions are made depending on circumstances. It is always a one-
        time grant"

        The Pet Fund
        [thepetfund.com]
        "The Pet Fund is a registered 501(c) 3 nonprofit association that
        provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need
        urgent veterinary care. Often animals are put down or suffer
        needlessly because their owners cannot afford expensive surgery or
        emergency vet visits. Companion animal owners must often make the
        difficult decision to put an animal down or neglect urgent medical
        needs because of the costs involved. The purpose of the Pet Fund is
        to work towards a future where decisions about companion animal
        medical care need never be made on the basis of cost."

        United Animal Nations
        [www.uan.org]
        "The mission of LifeLine is to help homeless or recently rescued
        animals suffering from life-threatening conditions that require
        specific and immediate emergency veterinary care. We strive to serve
        Good Samaritans and rescue groups who take in sick or injured
        animals. In certain cases, LifeLine can also assist senior citizens
        and low-income families pay for immediate emergency veterinary

        More here - this one is Sue's link:
        http://www.magdrl-nj.com/links.html#finance


        Hugs,
        Candace





        On 5/2/07, vanillalotus <vanillalotus@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just on Sunday my cat was diagnosed with Chronic Heart Failure.
        > Everyday since then she has either been to the hospital or feline
        > clinic. I have gotten the credit card to help with the sudden
        > expenses, they only gave me an 1000 limit. But over the past 2 days I
        > am on the brink of using that all up. I'm fearful that in the next few
        > days if this constant need to go to the hospital keeps up me and my
        > husband will be poor and no longer able to help her or feed/house
        > ourselves. Is ther anything that i can do to aquire more money to see
        > if my cat has a fighting chance of making it through her heart
        > disease. It's really starting to get the point that we are considering
        > euthanising her if she requires another hospital visit. I don't want
        > to euthanise her but i don't want to be broke either. Help me PLEASE.
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sue at MAGDRL
        Hi, There are others in your situation. I keep a list on my rescue web site of organizations who give financial assistance
        Message 3 of 5 , May 2 9:38 AM
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          Hi,

          There are others in your situation. I keep a list on my rescue web site of
          organizations who give financial assistance
          http://www.magdrl-nj.com/links.html#finance


          Best to you and your cat!!!

          Sue & Angel Pepper



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "vanillalotus" <vanillalotus@...>
          To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2007 11:24 AM
          Subject: [FH] Financial Assistance


          > Just on Sunday my cat was diagnosed with Chronic Heart Failure.
          > Everyday since then she has either been to the hospital or feline
          > clinic. I have gotten the credit card to help with the sudden
          > expenses, they only gave me an 1000 limit. But over the past 2 days I
          > am on the brink of using that all up. I'm fearful that in the next few
          > days if this constant need to go to the hospital keeps up me and my
          > husband will be poor and no longer able to help her or feed/house
          > ourselves. Is ther anything that i can do to aquire more money to see
          > if my cat has a fighting chance of making it through her heart
          > disease. It's really starting to get the point that we are considering
          > euthanising her if she requires another hospital visit. I don't want
          > to euthanise her but i don't want to be broke either. Help me PLEASE.
          >
          >
        • Sandra Richards
          I just thought I d relate my own experience. My cat Buffy goes into pulmonary edema frequently and pretty much without warning. Otherwise you d never know
          Message 4 of 5 , May 2 9:51 AM
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            I just thought I'd relate my own experience. My cat Buffy goes into
            pulmonary edema frequently and pretty much without warning. Otherwise you'd
            never know there was anything the matter with her. She's happy and very
            active. But we've had to rush her to emergency many a time. The vets always
            tell me her condition is dire and that she needs to be hooked up to an IV,
            and sometimes admitted overnight. To me, she never looked that bad, that she
            needed such extensive treatment, but they would always insist that they did.
            So I'd go along with it, and ask that everything but the essential treatment
            be taken off the estimate. I don't think they were trying to rip me off, I
            just don't think they have experience living 24 hrs/day with a cat with this
            condition. It would always piss me off, when they'd start going on about
            Buffy's amazing recovery, when I was the one insisting all along that she
            didn't need all the bells and whistles.

            Last time I brought her in April, the vet told me that treating her was
            going to cost $1000-1200 or my other option given how many times she's been
            in the ER was to euthanize her. I told him I needed time to decide, and
            after about an hour of hand wringing decided that I didn't like either of
            those options. I did get the bill down to $600. In the meantime, I've been
            getting more experience with treating the less severe episodes that don't
            require hospitalization. I mean you bring a cat to the ER they get
            injectable lasix and an oxygen tank, however, that is still the same basic
            treatment they can get at home.

            So last week, she went into severe pulmonary edema again. Heard a howl
            upstairs, and there she was coughing up fluid and breathing almost
            convulsively. I decided I couldn't go through with the ordeal of going to
            the ER again, and decided to deal with it at home, and if she didn't make
            it, I was prepared. Now I have inquired into the dosage amounts that they
            give in ER. So she got 60mg lasix. It takes 20 minutes to start working
            (though you can notice differences at 15), and figured that wasn't much
            longer than the time it takes to drive to the hospital. Those 20 minutes are
            excruciating, I comfort the cat, and it does calm her down and help her get
            through it. It takes much longer for her to come down from it, but she was
            up and walking around again after about an hour. I continued with two more
            smaller 10mg doses about once an hour. And had plenty of water on hand for
            her. All of this cost me less than a dollar, as opposed to $1000.

            Now I'm not recommending this as instructions to be followed, and it's
            something I don't think I would have been comfortable with at the outset.
            But just in hindsight, I've felt sorta bullied by the vets, in that they
            were not taking me seriously. I've been through this with my cat often
            enough that I know what she needs, and yet every time they pretty much
            insist she be hospitalized overnight. I'm sure that is probably gentler on
            her system, but it's not really an option if she needs frequent treatment.
            I'm also pissed off that they seem so eager for me to euthanize my cat.
            Maybe that's what most people would choose, but she is really enjoying her
            life (aside from the half an hour every couple of weeks or so when she is in
            pulmonary edema), and actually is always noticeably happier right after one
            of these episodes. So after spending about $4000 over the past six months,
            this is the route I've decided to take from here on in.

            Sandra


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jamie Cross
            I totally agree about being bullied by vets, especially the ER vets. Everytime I have taken one of my cats to them, they INSIST that the cat be tested for
            Message 5 of 5 , May 2 3:06 PM
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              I totally agree about being bullied by vets, especially the ER vets. Everytime I have taken one of my cats to them, they INSIST that the cat be tested for EVERY disease they can possibly get, feline leukemia, distemper, you name it, and they always want to test them, no matter what the cat was there for. I always told them the same thing, my cats have had all of their vaccines. And they always had the same reply, "they could still have something even if they have been vaccinated." That makes me so mad! I mean, they push and push for cats to be vaccinated, and even when they are, they insist on testing them for the diseases the vaccines are supposed to prevent!

              When my cat Kylee first developed a bloodclot in one of her legs, I didn't know what it was and it was late at night. So I took her to the ER vet, and of course he wanted to test her for everything, but I said no. I paid over $500 to that vet for other tests and he still didn't know what was wrong with her. I sure could have used that money for other care that she needed. After that experience, I decided that I would not use an ER vet again unless there was absolutely no other choice. The vet that I use now will take emergencies 24 hours a day. There are many vets that are doing this now, so this may be an option for other people here. I'm sure there is an extra charge for them to come in in the middle of the night, but it would be worth it, and it would still probably be less than an ER visit. There are also vets that are staying open later. Kylee's is open until 11 PM.

              I also agree with Sandra, once you get more familiar with your cat's health condition, you can figure out what you can do at home to prevent going to the ER.

              Jamie

              Sandra Richards <sandra.richards@...> wrote:
              I just thought I'd relate my own experience. My cat Buffy goes into
              pulmonary edema frequently and pretty much without warning. Otherwise you'd
              never know there was anything the matter with her. She's happy and very
              active. But we've had to rush her to emergency many a time. The vets always
              tell me her condition is dire and that she needs to be hooked up to an IV,
              and sometimes admitted overnight. To me, she never looked that bad, that she
              needed such extensive treatment, but they would always insist that they did.
              So I'd go along with it, and ask that everything but the essential treatment
              be taken off the estimate. I don't think they were trying to rip me off, I
              just don't think they have experience living 24 hrs/day with a cat with this
              condition. It would always piss me off, when they'd start going on about
              Buffy's amazing recovery, when I was the one insisting all along that she
              didn't need all the bells and whistles.

              Last time I brought her in April, the vet told me that treating her was
              going to cost $1000-1200 or my other option given how many times she's been
              in the ER was to euthanize her. I told him I needed time to decide, and
              after about an hour of hand wringing decided that I didn't like either of
              those options. I did get the bill down to $600. In the meantime, I've been
              getting more experience with treating the less severe episodes that don't
              require hospitalization. I mean you bring a cat to the ER they get
              injectable lasix and an oxygen tank, however, that is still the same basic
              treatment they can get at home.

              So last week, she went into severe pulmonary edema again. Heard a howl
              upstairs, and there she was coughing up fluid and breathing almost
              convulsively. I decided I couldn't go through with the ordeal of going to
              the ER again, and decided to deal with it at home, and if she didn't make
              it, I was prepared. Now I have inquired into the dosage amounts that they
              give in ER. So she got 60mg lasix. It takes 20 minutes to start working
              (though you can notice differences at 15), and figured that wasn't much
              longer than the time it takes to drive to the hospital. Those 20 minutes are
              excruciating, I comfort the cat, and it does calm her down and help her get
              through it. It takes much longer for her to come down from it, but she was
              up and walking around again after about an hour. I continued with two more
              smaller 10mg doses about once an hour. And had plenty of water on hand for
              her. All of this cost me less than a dollar, as opposed to $1000.

              Now I'm not recommending this as instructions to be followed, and it's
              something I don't think I would have been comfortable with at the outset.
              But just in hindsight, I've felt sorta bullied by the vets, in that they
              were not taking me seriously. I've been through this with my cat often
              enough that I know what she needs, and yet every time they pretty much
              insist she be hospitalized overnight. I'm sure that is probably gentler on
              her system, but it's not really an option if she needs frequent treatment.
              I'm also pissed off that they seem so eager for me to euthanize my cat.
              Maybe that's what most people would choose, but she is really enjoying her
              life (aside from the half an hour every couple of weeks or so when she is in
              pulmonary edema), and actually is always noticeably happier right after one
              of these episodes. So after spending about $4000 over the past six months,
              this is the route I've decided to take from here on in.

              Sandra

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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