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ace inhibitors - was Dandelion instead of Lasix

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  • nala nala
    Angel and everyone, If you haven t read vet go cardiology lately, it has been updated: http://www.vetgo.com/cardio/concepts/concsect.php?conceptkey=78 It
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 29 1:45 PM
      Angel and everyone,

      If you haven't read vet go cardiology lately, it has
      been updated:
      http://www.vetgo.com/cardio/concepts/concsect.php?conceptkey=78

      It starts out with Canine info followed by feline info
      and covers the three cardiomyopathies, HCM, DCM and
      RCM.

      It includes updated ACE-inhibitor info and also makes
      reference to the Lasix+ other drug studies that I
      posted about a few months ago as
      "lasix alone"

      here is an exerpt regarding ACE-I:

      Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors -
      Traditionally, treatment of HCM has focused on
      negative inotropic/chronotropic therapy (beta
      blockers, calcium channel blockers), and ACE
      inhibitors have been avoided (particularly in
      obstructive HCM) due to the impression that any
      arterial vasodilation may promote hypotension.
      However, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system
      (RAAS) plays an important role in stimulation of
      myocardial hypertrophy (which adversely affects
      diastolic function) and progression of heart failure.
      Therefore ACE-inhibitors may have some benefit in the
      setting of HCM. Recent work in veterinary medicine
      suggests that ACE-inhibition does not worsen dynamic
      LVOT obstruction or promote hypotension in HCM cats
      and that ACE-inhibitors are tolerated well in this
      population. Interim analysis of an ongoing prospective
      randomized clinical trial of therapy in feline HCM
      suggests that cats treated with ACE-inhibitors tend to
      have a better outcome (not statistically significant)
      than those treated with either beta-blockers or
      calcium channel blockers, and cats treated with
      beta-blockers had the worst outcome (statistically
      significant) of the treatment groups. As this trial is
      ongoing, any conclusions will have to await the final
      results.

      enalapril or benazepril: 0.25-0.5 mg/kg Q 24 hrs PO


      --- toreadpethealthinfo@... wrote:

      > Thanks, Leah. Very interesting. I did a cursory
      > search and found zip on this online. I'd love it if
      > you could post or send to me the info you have!
      >
      > Many thanks,
      > Angel & Wolfy
      >
      > Angel,
      >
      > Actually Susan wrote that post. But yes, enalapril
      > is one of the drugs that most kitties with kidney
      > and heart issues are on. It does "help", so to
      > speak, the kidneys. I can't tell you how or why but
      > I have read that several places on the web. Maybe
      > someone else can help with this who is more
      > technically and scientifically knowledgable. My
      > Angel Alec was on enalapril and he had both issues.
      > I will try to find some info to pass on to you.
      >
      > Leah and her cats and Angel Alec
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      >
      >


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