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RE: [FH] Re: Food

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  • Barbara Kraus
    My brother feeds his cat Katz-n-Flocken which was recommended by his vet. It is a high protein food (see description below) - not sure if that is appropriate
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2007
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      My brother feeds his cat Katz-n-Flocken which was recommended by his vet.
      It is a high protein food (see description below) - not sure if that is
      appropriate for cats with heart and/or kidney problems. There is also a
      tuna-based canned food. For years, the conventional wisdom has suggested
      low-protein foods for kidney cats but I've heard some vets diagree with
      that.

      Solid Gold manufactures its own foods rather than using a third-party
      manufacturer such as Menu Foods.




      Katz-n-Flocken Cat Food (lamb)

      Product Description
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      ----
      New Formula! Dry food ideal for adult cats and kittens, to
      maintain total health.

      Protein, Min 34%
      Fat, Min 12%
      Fiber, Max 4%
      Moisture, Max 10%
      Calories per cup, 323


      Ingredients
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      ----
      Lamb | Chicken Meal | Millet | Brown Rice | Ocean Fish Meal | Cracked
      Pearled Barley | Canola Oil | Natural Flavor | Salmon Oil (source of DHA) |
      Flaxseed | Potassium Chloride | Choline Chloride | Taurine | Dried Chicory
      Root | Amaranth | Parsley Flakes | Spearmint | Almond Oil | Sesame Oil |
      Yucca Schidigera Extract | Kelp | Thyme | Blueberries | Cranberries | Apples
      | Lentils | Quinoa | Vitamin E Supplement | Iron Proteinate | Zinc
      Proteinate | Copper Proteinate | Ferrous Sulfate | Zinc Sulfate | Copper
      Sulfate | Potassium Iodide | Thiamine Mononitrate | Manganese Proteinate |
      Manganous Oxide | Ascorbic Acid | Vitamin A Supplement | Biotin | Calcium
      Panthothenate | Manganese Sulfate | Sodium Selenite | Pyridoxine
      Hydrochloride | Vitamin B12 Supplement | Riboflavin | Vitamin D Supplement |
      Folic Acid |


      -----Original Message-----
      From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com]On
      Behalf Of diane
      Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:40 AM
      To: Carole; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [FH] Re: Food


      I have a sample pack of Wellness coming, it was posted to this list a
      couple of days ago.

      The pet store didn't have any samples, suppose I can try Petsmart.

      I've heard good things about Wellness, Nutro (but don't they have a
      suspect product right now?) and California <insert 2nd word here>. A
      friend feeds that to her dogs and has for a long time, she's a very
      organic person herself and did a lot of research on it.

      Diane





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • savionna@aol.com
      Hi (sorry I don t know your name), ... Katz-n-Flocken is a dry food with a high plant content, incl millet, rice, barley, chicory, amaranth, apples, lentils,
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 2, 2007
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        Hi (sorry I don't know your name),

        In a message dated 4/1/07 11:20:29 AM, bjk5377@... writes:

        > My brother feeds his cat Katz-n-Flocken which was recommended by his vet.
        >
        Katz-n-Flocken is a dry food with a high plant content, incl millet, rice,
        barley, chicory, amaranth, apples, lentils, and quinoa. Cats are obligate
        carnivores and by and large do not eat plants in the evolutionary diet and have
        limited ability to process plants, which can have adverse effects.

        > It is a high protein food
        >
        "High" is relative...and this product is around the average of 30-35%
        calories from protein for dry foods. According to the guaranteed analysis, which does
        not represent what's actually in the product (the GA is basically minimums
        and maximums for several categories), the product contains 36% calories from
        protein, 30% calories from fat, and 34% calories from carbohydrate. Other
        products that contain similar protein levels incl Calif. Natural at 35%, Max Cat Lite
        at 36%, and Sci Di Indoor at 37%.

        Dry foods with a higher protein content relative to others on the market
        would incl Innova EVO at 46%, Wellness Core at 48%, and Purina DM at 50%.

        > not sure if that is
        > appropriate for cats with heart and/or kidney problems.
        >
        Foods with a high grain/plant content and 34% calories from carbohydrate are
        not appropriate for any cat. High amts of carbohydrate, particularly from
        grains, is a major contributing factor to such "common" health disorders as dia
        betes, obesity, inflammatory bowel, allergy, urinary disorders, and gum/teeth
        disorders.

        >   There is also a
        > tuna-based canned food. 
        >
        Tuna and other fish-based cat foods (depending on fish species and where
        caught) are potentially problematic for several reasons, incl potentially high
        content of histamine, of components that contribute to struvite crystals
        formation, of phosphorus, and of ocean contaminants, as well as a strong taste that
        can put cats off blander meat-based foods. Solid Gold Tuna also contains 21%
        calories from carbohydrate, which is quite high relative to higher-quality canned
        foods (which generally have 5-10% calories from carbohydrate).

        > For years, the conventional wisdom has suggested
        > low-protein foods for kidney cats but I've heard some vets diagree with
        > that.
        >
        The "conventional wisdom" of feeding reduced protein for kidney cats was
        based on faulty interpretations of studies done in the early-mid 1900s on dogs and
        rats, neither of whom are obligate carnivores, as are cats.

        Some links on that include:

        1. "Nutritional Management of Dogs and Cats with Chronic Renal Failure" by
        Kalkstein, DVM, DACVIM at www.southpaws.com/news/99-2-nutrition-CF.htm

        2. "Mythology of Protein Restriction for Dogs with Reduced Renal Function,"
        by Kenneth Bovee, DVM, MMedSc (UPenn) at
        http://www.geocities.com/jjfleisher/bovee_protein_RD.pdf

        3. "Effects of Dietary Protein Intake on Renal Functions," by Delmar Finco,
        DVM, PhD (Univ of Ga) at
        http://www.geocities.com/jjfleisher/finco.pdf

        4. "Dietary Protein and the Kidney" by Patricia Schenck, DVM, PhD (Michigan
        State Univ) at
        http://web.archive.org/web/20040205075757/http://www.cm-d.com/buckeye/tech_manual/8_28.html

        5. www.dogaware.com/kidney.html

        // Rosemary


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