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Food vet statement and questions

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  • Cannon,Kimberly
    Ok, I asked the vet about foods again. He still insists on the wet kidney formula diet. My vet is very against dry foods of any type or brand for cats
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 2, 2007
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      Ok, I asked the vet about foods again. He still insists on the wet kidney
      formula diet. My vet is very against dry foods of any type or brand for
      cats because he says that they are too high in carbs and the cats overeat
      them. But, the by product issue does not seem to bother him. He says by-
      products do not hurt cats, and she needs the lower phophorus and proteins so
      her kidneys have less junk to get out of her body. He said unfortunityly the
      garins have to go up in a lower protein meal. Any ideas...is he completely
      full of it, or what?


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Chris Martin
      No he s not full of it :-) I disagree with him somewhat about the by-products--they are a fairly low-quality source of protein, but they are less likely to
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 2, 2007
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        No he's not full of it :-) I disagree with him somewhat about the
        by-products--they are a fairly low-quality source of protein, but they
        are less likely to cause high BUN, and generally have less phosphorus,
        than muscle and (especially) organ meats. For normally healthy cats i
        would feed as few byproducts as possible but for a cat with kidney
        problems this is the best solution so far to the BUN/phosphorus issue.
        Also, byproducts are not "evil"--all cats eat byproducts in the wild;
        they just don't eat them as the primary protein source in their diets.
        Muscle meat should be the largest percentage of meat protein,
        certainly. But with the current state of research on kidney-friendly
        diets, increasing byproducts vs. muscle meat seems to be the solution
        at this point.

        Of course, there is a lot of discussion these days about how good renal
        diets actually are for cats. Lowering protein content in a cat's diet
        often leads to muscle wasting, since cats are so dependent on animal
        protein. There is a very interesting and informative discussion here:
        <http://www.felinecrf.org/nutritional_requirements.htm#protein>

        Your vet is absolutely correct about carbohydrates. Cats who get diets
        high in carbs do tend to overeat, especially if the food is a cheap
        one. Cats are carnivores. Period. They do not process carbohydrates
        with any efficiency at all. They lack amylase in their saliva, so they
        don't begin the digestive process of carbohydrates in the mouth as we
        do. A diet high in dry food/carbohydrate is hence very bad for the
        teeth. DRy foods have a lot of carbs in them--usually corn--just by
        their nature. With cheaper foods, especially those very high in
        carbohydrates, cats tend to eat and eat and eat just to get their
        protein needs met, and by ingesting so much carbohydrate they get
        fat--obese, even. Diabetes is now a virtual epidemic among cats in the
        U.S. Finally, dry food is not great for kidney cats b/c they require
        more moisture, and dry food doesn't have any :-)

        So far, there is no perfect solution regarding renal diets FOR CATS,
        since they do require so much protein for optimum health. But IMO your
        vet is right on track re: canned vs. dry food.

        Chris, grateful to have known Kitty Xerox
        "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired,
        signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not
        fed, those who are cold and are not clothed."--President Dwight D.
        Eisenhower, April 16, 1953

        --

        On Mar 2, 2007, at 8:03 AM, Cannon,Kimberly wrote:

        > Ok, I asked the vet about foods again. He still insists on the wet
        > kidney
        > formula diet. My vet is very against dry foods of any type or brand
        > for
        > cats because he says that they are too high in carbs and the cats
        > overeat
        > them. But, the by product issue does not seem to bother him. He says
        > by-
        > products do not hurt cats, and she needs the lower phophorus and
        > proteins so
        > her kidneys have less junk to get out of her body. He said
        > unfortunityly the
        > garins have to go up in a lower protein meal. Any ideas...is he
        > completely
        > full of it, or what?
      • db4catz
        Here is a website that has a list of canned cat foods nutrional information It lists protein, fat, cars,
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 3, 2007
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          Here is a website that has a list of canned cat foods nutrional information <http://
          www.geocities.com/jmpeerson/canfood.html> It lists protein, fat, cars, fiber, phosphorus,
          and calories. Look for food with less than 200 phosphorus, 40 protein, and 15 carbs.

          Good luck!

          Debby, Maggie's Mom
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