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blood clots in veins vs. arteries

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  • db4catz
    Hi Sue, How is Pepper today? I wanted to add some thoughts about deep vein thrombosis. I ve had phelbitis twice, and what you describe corresponds with my
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 1, 2006
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      Hi Sue,

      How is Pepper today?

      I wanted to add some thoughts about deep vein thrombosis. I've had phelbitis twice, and
      what you describe corresponds with my symptoms (except the bitting of the leg). I was
      given blood thinning meds, as well as cortizone to reduce the inflammation. With the
      second attack, I had to keep my foot higher than my heart for a week. I have bad veins and
      valves and have had trouble in both legs, though one is worse.

      The way I understand it, blood clots in the artery travel from the heart until they get to a
      narrow spot. Fresh blood and oxygen aren't getting to the area after the clot, and tissues
      can't work without the blood flow. That is what happens with saddle thrombosis and why
      the legs are cold.

      With veins, the blood has spent it's oxygen and is making the long trip back to the lungs
      and heart. There are also valves along the vein that help "push" the blood along it's way.
      With people, and I assume with cats, where the clot is matters alot. Your veins are smaller
      at the extremities and get increasingly larger as they get closer to the body core, A small
      clot can block a vein near the foot, but won't be big enough to block the blood flow in the
      groin. The blood backs up and becomes stagnant, which lead to inflammation, swelling
      and heat.

      I hope this helps.

      Debby, Maggie's Mom
    • christina suzanne
      1. Thanks, Debby, for such a understandable explanation about the difference between the clots. I was always confused, but won t be again. 2. A shaking paw
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 2, 2006
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        1. Thanks, Debby, for such a understandable
        explanation about the difference between the clots. I
        was always confused, but won't be again.

        2. A shaking paw story: Within a month of Isabel's
        recovery from her saddle thrombosis, I was sitting on
        the couch reading and she was walking by the doorway
        of the room. She picked up her front paw and started
        shaking it, then she walked away. I completely
        panicked. As I ran for the Lovenox, I snagged my sock
        on a splinter in the floor at the doorway. I shook my
        foot to disengage the splinter and realized I had just
        made the identical motion (shakeshakeshake) as Isabel
        had moments before.

        Needless to say, no Lovenox injection for either of
        us.

        The splinter hurt, though, and I might have bitten my
        foot if I could've reached it!




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