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Re: Interferon?

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  • Kelley
    ... off. ... He gave me 10 days worth (10 doses). I m afraid to use it at this point, since her URI is not that bad.
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 29, 2006
      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Janie <sockster@...> wrote:
      >
      > My cat Jaguar uses this for FIV. They have him on it 7 days and 7
      off.
      > I am in the US and we get it at our local vet??
      > I think I would not put the heart kitty on it or ask how long. I
      > didn't know it had so many side effects. Janie
      >
      He gave me 10 days worth (10 doses). I'm afraid to use it at this
      point, since her URI is not that bad.
    • nala nala
      Kelley- I would talk to my vet about what you have heard about side effects of interferon on the human heart and whether or not the there are enough benefits
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 29, 2006
        Kelley-

        I would talk to my vet about what you have heard about
        side effects of interferon on the human heart and
        whether or not the there are enough benefits to URI
        treatment to outweigh the possible risks on the heart.
        Of course I would carefully monitor the kitty if I
        decided to continue with the Interferon treatment.

        -Nala

        >
        >
        >


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      • savionna@aol.com
        Hi Kelley, ... Sorry to be dense, but I m not understanding why interferon is being prescribed in the first place...if the uri is not that bad and seems to
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 29, 2006
          Hi Kelley,

          In a message dated 9/29/06 11:22:04 AM, moonvine@... writes:

          > He gave me 10 days worth (10 doses).  I'm afraid to use it at this
          > point, since her URI is not that bad.
          >
          Sorry to be dense, but I'm not understanding why interferon is being
          prescribed in the first place...if the uri is "not that bad" and seems to occur only
          when the cat is stressed (as opposed to chronic infection). Certainly
          interferon is one way to manage viruses, such as FeLV, FIV and herpes. But there are
          also gentler, less intense, potentially lower-risk options that may not make you
          as afraid.

          If the cat has frequent upper respiratory infections, have you thought about
          why? Eg, what is stressing the respiratory system, what contributing factors
          are in the environment, and what can be done to amend the environment and
          support the respiratory and immune systems? What does the cat eat?

          You mention that it might be stress related. That's entirely possible, since
          stressors affect the immunity, which can open the door to susceptibility for
          pathogens and "allergens" to overwhelm the system. You also mentioned Clavamox,
          which is an antibx. Most upper respiratory issues are viral, for which antibx
          are ineffective, except for secondary bacterial infections, which may or may
          not be present. Viruses are usually self-limiting, which makes supportive care
          a sound option.

          There are various complementary options for upper respiratory infection.
          Transfer Factor and colostrum are ways to support the immune system overall.
          Goldenseal is a way to support the respiratory system. Colloidal silver is a way to
          reduce pathogens. Stinging nettles and N-acetyl-cysteine can provide
          symptomic relief. Flower essences can help release emotional energy provoked by
          stressors. Perhaps some of these options might be appropriate for Missy. // Rosemary




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • moonvine@austin.rr.com
          ... I don t understand either. I guess I should ask the vet. ... Missy eats Felidae Platinum. Since the episodes of URI are consistent with my absences, I
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 29, 2006
            > Hi Kelley,
            >
            > In a message dated 9/29/06 11:22:04 AM, moonvine@...
            writes:
            >
            > > He gave me 10 days worth (10 doses).  I'm afraid to use it at this
            > > point, since her URI is not that bad.
            > >
            > Sorry to be dense, but I'm not understanding why interferon is
            > being
            > prescribed in the first place...if the uri is "not that bad" and
            > seems to occur only
            > when the cat is stressed (as opposed to chronic infection).
            > Certainly
            > interferon is one way to manage viruses, such as FeLV, FIV and
            > herpes. But there are
            > also gentler, less intense, potentially lower-risk options that
            > may not make you
            > as afraid.

            I don't understand either. I guess I should ask the vet.
            >
            > If the cat has frequent upper respiratory infections, have you
            > thought about
            > why? Eg, what is stressing the respiratory system, what
            > contributing factors
            > are in the environment, and what can be done to amend the
            > environment and
            > support the respiratory and immune systems? What does the cat eat?

            Missy eats Felidae Platinum. Since the episodes of URI are consistent
            with my absences, I believe she is stressed by my absence. There is a
            pretty obvious pattern - I go out of town, she's well when I leave,
            and when I get back she's sick.
            >
            > You mention that it might be stress related. That's entirely
            > possible, since
            > stressors affect the immunity, which can open the door to
            > susceptibility for
            > pathogens and "allergens" to overwhelm the system. You also
            > mentioned Clavamox,
            > which is an antibx. Most upper respiratory issues are viral, for
            > which antibx
            > are ineffective, except for secondary bacterial infections, which
            > may or may
            > not be present. Viruses are usually self-limiting, which makes
            > supportive care
            > a sound option.

            I've never understood this either, but so far (I've been doing rescue
            for only a year, so there is lots I don't know yet) when I have URI
            cases they get prescribed either amoxycillin, clavamox, or in extreme
            cases zithromax. I have had kittens get injections of interferon, but
            I've never been given oral interferon before. I also do nebulizer
            therapy with Albuterol.
            >
            > There are various complementary options for upper respiratory
            > infection.
            > Transfer Factor and colostrum are ways to support the immune
            > system overall.
            > Goldenseal is a way to support the respiratory system. Colloidal
            > silver is a way to
            > reduce pathogens. Stinging nettles and N-acetyl-cysteine can
            > provide
            > symptomic relief. Flower essences can help release emotional
            > energy provoked by
            > stressors. Perhaps some of these options might be appropriate for
            > Missy. // Rosemary
            >
            Thank you very much for all the suggestions. I will look into them
            immediately.
          • Hideyo Yamamoto
            Also try L-Lysine 500 mg every day - it really work for URIs, too. _____ From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 29, 2006
              Also try L-Lysine 500 mg every day - it really work for URIs, too.



              _____

              From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of savionna@...
              Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 2:55 PM
              To: moonvine@...; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [FH] Re: Interferon?



              Hi Kelley,

              In a message dated 9/29/06 11:22:04 AM, moonvine@...
              <mailto:moonvine%40austin.rr.com> writes:

              > He gave me 10 days worth (10 doses). I'm afraid to use it at this
              > point, since her URI is not that bad.
              >
              Sorry to be dense, but I'm not understanding why interferon is being
              prescribed in the first place...if the uri is "not that bad" and seems
              to occur only
              when the cat is stressed (as opposed to chronic infection). Certainly
              interferon is one way to manage viruses, such as FeLV, FIV and herpes.
              But there are
              also gentler, less intense, potentially lower-risk options that may not
              make you
              as afraid.

              If the cat has frequent upper respiratory infections, have you thought
              about
              why? Eg, what is stressing the respiratory system, what contributing
              factors
              are in the environment, and what can be done to amend the environment
              and
              support the respiratory and immune systems? What does the cat eat?

              You mention that it might be stress related. That's entirely possible,
              since
              stressors affect the immunity, which can open the door to susceptibility
              for
              pathogens and "allergens" to overwhelm the system. You also mentioned
              Clavamox,
              which is an antibx. Most upper respiratory issues are viral, for which
              antibx
              are ineffective, except for secondary bacterial infections, which may or
              may
              not be present. Viruses are usually self-limiting, which makes
              supportive care
              a sound option.

              There are various complementary options for upper respiratory infection.

              Transfer Factor and colostrum are ways to support the immune system
              overall.
              Goldenseal is a way to support the respiratory system. Colloidal silver
              is a way to
              reduce pathogens. Stinging nettles and N-acetyl-cysteine can provide
              symptomic relief. Flower essences can help release emotional energy
              provoked by
              stressors. Perhaps some of these options might be appropriate for Missy.
              // Rosemary

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • savionna@aol.com
              Hi Kelley, ... I m guessing it s b/c conventional medicine has limited options to deal with viruses. ... Canned or dry?? While Felidae is generally
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 29, 2006
                Hi Kelley,

                In a message dated 9/29/06 5:05:07 PM, moonvine@... writes:


                > I don't understand either.  I guess I should ask the vet.
                >
                I'm guessing it's b/c conventional medicine has limited options to deal with
                viruses.

                > Missy eats Felidae Platinum.
                >
                Canned or dry?? While Felidae is generally conscientious about its products,
                I'm a little concerned on several counts.

                Dry food in general is high in carbohydrate, which contributes to weight gain
                (usually from stored fat when the glucose load released from carbohydrate is
                not used quickly) and dehydration (b/c it contains only 10% moisture). This is
                even more of a factor in products such as Felidae platinum, which are
                advertised as low in protein and fat for "overweight" cats. There are only 3
                macronutrients (besides water)...so if it's low in those 2, then it's high in
                carbohydrate. Cats have no dietary requirement for carbohydrate...and feeding
                carbohydrate to a body that can't process it efficiently has consequences, incl weight
                gain and "allergic"-type reactions that affect the immune system and
                potentially the respiratory system. So, if you'd like, it might be a good idea to
                consider a canned food if you're feeding dry...and to consider a product that is
                not low in protein and fat, which are the macronutrients that cats need. There
                is no nutritional justification for feeding reduced protein or fat to cats.
                Not senior or overweight cats (as the product is advertised)...and not a
                one-year-old cat, whose body is still growing and who needs quality animal proteins
                and fats.

                If you'd like to do some reading on feline nutrition, some sources of
                information incl:

                1. http://home.earthlink.net/~jacm2/id1.html
                2. www.catinfo.org
                3. www.maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm
                4. http://rocquoone.com/diet_and_health.htm
                5. www.advancepetfood.com.au/nutrition
                6. ww.drsfostersmith.com/general.cfm?siteid=0&gid=74&ref=2066&subref=AN

                I'm also a bit concerned about the ingredients, since things like rice,
                herring, and alfalfa may contribute to the problem.

                >   Since the episodes of URI are consistent
                > with my absences, I believe she is stressed by my absence.  There is a
                > pretty obvious pattern - I go out of town, she's well when I leave,
                > and when I get back she's sick.
                >
                Does anything else happen while you're away? Eg, is she boarded? Does she not
                like the sitter? Does her feeding pattern change (more/less often, more/less
                volume)? Does she go out or not go out as she usually does? Etc. Changes in
                habit can often give more clues to what's going on that makes her susceptible to
                respiratory infection.

                There are many types of flower essences, but one of the most readily
                available is Bach's (www.bachflower.com)...and there may be an essence that fits
                Missy's personality and the situation. Active communication...ie, telling her in
                words and visualizations when you're going, what you're doing, when you'll be
                back, etc...can also reduce the stress of your absence.

                > I've never understood this either, but so far (I've been doing rescue
                > for only a year, so there is lots I don't know yet) when I have URI
                > cases they get prescribed either amoxycillin, clavamox, or in extreme
                > cases zithromax.
                >
                See above. Conventional med. doesn't have many options for treating
                virus...so it uses antibx in the event of secondary bacterial infection.

                >  I also do nebulizer
                > therapy with Albuterol.
                >
                Warm-mist vaporizers also work well to reduce congestion in "regular" upper
                respiratory problems.

                > Thank you very much for all the suggestions.  I will look into them
                > immediately.
                >
                You're welcome. If you have questions, just ask. Hope something works out for
                you. // Rosemary


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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