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Re: [FH] Junior not eating much

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  • Sue at MAGDRL
    Hi, It s been posted that a low-salt diet isn t all that necessary for cats. I suspect they re following what they know for humans with high blood pressure,
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 2, 2006
      Hi,

      It's been posted that a low-salt diet isn't all that necessary for cats. I
      suspect they're following what they know for humans with high blood
      pressure, but this is a different situation.

      Any time you change food, it should be done gradually. Mix a tiny bit of
      the new food in with the old and then gradually add more. Cats can be
      extremely particular about what they eat. He could be hiding because he
      feels bad from hunger, the medications and all the other changes. It's very
      important that cats eat. If they don't they can develop hepatic lipidosis
      (fatty liver disease) which is often fatal. If that were my situation, I
      would switch back to the old food until he's eating again and then start to
      gradually switch over.

      What brand / flavor is the new foods? Dry food is just not good for cats.
      It contains grains which are not good for them and unless Junior drinks a
      lot of water, it can make him dehydrated. This message talks about foods
      that are good for a cat with heart disease
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/feline-heart/message/24084

      See if you can get him to eat his old food before starting a switch. Then
      see if he starts to return to his normal routine. You can always talk to
      the vet on the phone without bringing him in.

      Please post back about how he's doing.


      Sue



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "ichiume1" <ichiume1@...>
      To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, September 01, 2006 11:25 PM
      Subject: [FH] Junior not eating much


      > Hey everyone,
      > thanks to those that have posted a reply to my message, reading about your
      kitties has
      > helped me a lot and now I have all new questions to ask my vet!
      > I'm a little worried about Junior tonight. He doesn't seem to be eating
      much and I wonder if it
      > has anything to do with the benazepril. Junior has never been a big eater
      but now he is hardly
      > touching his food. It could also be the new low-salt food my vet has him
      on and I wonder if I
      > should give him some of the old just so he'll eat. Does anyone know of any
      good low salt
      > canned or dry food (what he normally eats) other then the Purina C/V?
      > I'm also worried because he hasn't left my roommates bedroom since Sunday.
      He just feels a
      > bit off to me but I hate to take him to the vet again because it really
      stresses him out. Any
      > advise on what to do next?
      >
      > J. and Junior
      >
      >
    • savionna@aol.com
      Hi J, ... Could be. Synthetic medications can sometimes depress appetite. If he s really nauseous, there are gentle remedies that can help soothe his digestive
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 2, 2006
        Hi J,

        In a message dated 9/1/06 11:26:08 PM, ichiume1@... writes:

        > He doesn't seem to be eating much and I wonder if it
        > has anything to do with the benazepril.
        >
        Could be. Synthetic medications can sometimes depress appetite. If he's
        really nauseous, there are gentle remedies that can help soothe his digestive
        system.

        > Junior has never been a big eater but now he is hardly
        > touching his food. It could also be the new low-salt food my vet has him on
        > and I wonder if I
        > should give him some of the old just so he'll eat.
        >
        Yes, I think that's a good idea. When a cat isn't eating...then you can use
        whatever he'll eat, within reason.

        > Does anyone know of any good low salt
        > canned or dry food (what he normally eats) other then the Purina C/V?
        >
        Sodium restriction is not necessarily a good idea. All cats, incl heart cats,
        need a high-quality, species-appropriate diet with high amts of high-quality
        animal protein, moderate amts of animal fats, little to no plant carbohydrate,
        and 60-80% moisture. Dry food is problematic b/c it is moderate to low in
        animal proteins, moderate in animal fats, high in plant carbohydrate, and low in
        moisture (10%)...and the high carbohydrate content can affect fluid balance,
        which is not desirable in a heart cat. So it would be in Junior's best interest
        to eat a higher-quality meat-based food, such as a grainfree or low-grain
        canned.

        These are the primary ingredients of Purina CV: Liver, water sufficient for
        processing, beef, ground yellow corn, fish. Liver is not appropriate primary
        source of proteins, in part b/c it's high in Vit A. Liver is fine, as long as
        its in *general proportion* to muscle meats. In a typical prey animal, the liver
        is about 3-5% of the whole animal. Beef muscle meat is in theory a good
        source of proteins (leaving aside the condition of the stock animal)...but some
        cats have an adverse reaction to it. Corn has no place in feeding cats, period.
        Fish is not part of the cat's evolutionary diet...and, among other problems,
        cause adverse reactions, in part b/c of a high histamine content (depending on
        species). So from an ingredient standpoint, this isn't really a good choice.
        Besides, 18% of calories in this product come from carbohydrate...cats need zero
        percent.

        As for the sodium...Purina CV contains 0.20% by dry matter. If you look at
        the chart at http://webpages.charter.net/katkarma/canfood.htm, you'll see there
        are various commercial foods with around the same sodium content...so *if* you
        need to restrict sodium (and I'm not saying you do), then there are
        higher-quality foods with better ingredients.

        Junior may not want to eat the new food also, b/c he's accustomed to
        dry...and doesn't recognize canned it as food. So if you decide to provide a canned
        food, it might be a good idea to introduce it very slowly. And to do it after
        his appetite is somewhat stable again.

        If you're interested in information on nutrition, here are some articles with
        relatively reliable information:

        1. http://home.earthlink.net/~jacm2/id1.html
        2. www.catinfo.org
        3. www.maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm
        4. http://rocquoone.com/diet_and_health.htm
        5. www.advancepetfood.com.au/nutrition
        6. ww.drsfostersmith.com/general.cfm?siteid=0&gid=74&ref=2066&subref=AN

        // Rosemary


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jen Gilbert
        Wow, thanks for the great info Rosemary! It gives me food for thought! Jen and Junior ...
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 2, 2006
          Wow, thanks for the great info Rosemary! It gives me
          "food" for thought!
          Jen and Junior

          --- Savionna@... wrote:

          > Hi J,
          >
          > In a message dated 9/1/06 11:26:08 PM,
          > ichiume1@... writes:
          >
          > > He doesn't seem to be eating much and I wonder if
          > it
          > > has anything to do with the benazepril.
          > >
          > Could be. Synthetic medications can sometimes
          > depress appetite. If he's
          > really nauseous, there are gentle remedies that can
          > help soothe his digestive
          > system.
          >
          > > Junior has never been a big eater but now he is
          > hardly
          > > touching his food. It could also be the new
          > low-salt food my vet has him on
          > > and I wonder if I
          > > should give him some of the old just so he'll eat.
          >
          > >
          > Yes, I think that's a good idea. When a cat isn't
          > eating...then you can use
          > whatever he'll eat, within reason.
          >
          > > Does anyone know of any good low salt
          > > canned or dry food (what he normally eats) other
          > then the Purina C/V?
          > >
          > Sodium restriction is not necessarily a good idea.
          > All cats, incl heart cats,
          > need a high-quality, species-appropriate diet with
          > high amts of high-quality
          > animal protein, moderate amts of animal fats, little
          > to no plant carbohydrate,
          > and 60-80% moisture. Dry food is problematic b/c it
          > is moderate to low in
          > animal proteins, moderate in animal fats, high in
          > plant carbohydrate, and low in
          > moisture (10%)...and the high carbohydrate content
          > can affect fluid balance,
          > which is not desirable in a heart cat. So it would
          > be in Junior's best interest
          > to eat a higher-quality meat-based food, such as a
          > grainfree or low-grain
          > canned.
          >
          > These are the primary ingredients of Purina CV:
          > Liver, water sufficient for
          > processing, beef, ground yellow corn, fish. Liver is
          > not appropriate primary
          > source of proteins, in part b/c it's high in Vit A.
          > Liver is fine, as long as
          > its in *general proportion* to muscle meats. In a
          > typical prey animal, the liver
          > is about 3-5% of the whole animal. Beef muscle meat
          > is in theory a good
          > source of proteins (leaving aside the condition of
          > the stock animal)...but some
          > cats have an adverse reaction to it. Corn has no
          > place in feeding cats, period.
          > Fish is not part of the cat's evolutionary
          > diet...and, among other problems,
          > cause adverse reactions, in part b/c of a high
          > histamine content (depending on
          > species). So from an ingredient standpoint, this
          > isn't really a good choice.
          > Besides, 18% of calories in this product come from
          > carbohydrate...cats need zero
          > percent.
          >
          > As for the sodium...Purina CV contains 0.20% by dry
          > matter. If you look at
          > the chart at
          > http://webpages.charter.net/katkarma/canfood.htm,
          > you'll see there
          > are various commercial foods with around the same
          > sodium content...so *if* you
          > need to restrict sodium (and I'm not saying you do),
          > then there are
          > higher-quality foods with better ingredients.
          >
          > Junior may not want to eat the new food also, b/c
          > he's accustomed to
          > dry...and doesn't recognize canned it as food. So if
          > you decide to provide a canned
          > food, it might be a good idea to introduce it very
          > slowly. And to do it after
          > his appetite is somewhat stable again.
          >
          > If you're interested in information on nutrition,
          > here are some articles with
          > relatively reliable information:
          >
          > 1. http://home.earthlink.net/~jacm2/id1.html
          > 2. www.catinfo.org
          > 3. www.maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm
          > 4. http://rocquoone.com/diet_and_health.htm
          > 5. www.advancepetfood.com.au/nutrition
          > 6.
          >
          ww.drsfostersmith.com/general.cfm?siteid=0&gid=74&ref=2066&subref=AN
          >
          > // Rosemary
          >


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