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Re: [FH] frontline

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  • savionna@aol.com
    Hi Betty, In a message dated 2/1/06 6:11:38 PM, bmusical@peoplepc.com writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2006
      Hi Betty,

      In a message dated 2/1/06 6:11:38 PM, bmusical@... writes:

      << Max is starting to scratch and another of my cats was treated for tape
      worms today. That can mean only one thing in the deep South (Ga) and that is that
      fleas have made an early appearance. >>

      Have you combed the both of them to determine if fleas are on the animals?

      << Is it okay to use Frontline on a cat with HCM? >>

      I don't know specifically with heart cats. But some caregivers have concerns
      about using a Class II pesticide that is neurotoxic to mammals (keeping in
      mind that toxicity is a complicated issue and in part depends on dose)...not only
      for its effect on the cat but also on the larger environment. Just for my
      part, I would not be comfortable using a synthetic pesticide on any companion
      animal.

      << If not, what is the alternative? >>

      There are a several relatively safe, nontoxic alternatives...but they require
      more effort on our part than applying a pesticide on the cat.

      Fleas have a life cycle...only a small part of which is spent feeding on the
      animal. The majority of it is spent living in the environment. So an effective
      way to manage a flea infestation is to manage the environment.

      Thorough and frequent (like at least 1x/wk) vacuuming is a very effective way
      of removing all stages of fleas; it's important to empty the vacuum bag or
      canister into a sealable container and get it out of the house so that fleas
      don't have a chance to reinfest. It's also helpful to wash everything washable:
      throw rugs, cat beds, blankets, toys, etc.

      There are a couple of products with low mammalian toxicity that can help
      control pre-adult fleas indoors. One is a borate product, eg www.fleabusters.com.
      Another is an insect growth regulator (eg Precor or Nylar); these are
      available from pest-control stores and online suppliers and prevent pre-adult pests
      from maturing (adulticides, which target adult fleas, are more toxic and carry
      more risk...even tho pest-control people often recommend them). For outdoors,
      there are beneficial nematodes that prey on pests and will remain in an
      environment as long as there are pest hosts. Steinernema carpocapsae is the species
      that preys on fleas. Both IGRs and beneficial nematodes can be applied with a
      hand-held sprayer.

      For the cat...thorough and frequent combing (like 1x/day) with a fine-toothed
      flea comb works very well at eliminating adults. Simply dunk any adult fleas
      captured on the comb in a bowl of soapy hot water; they drown instantly. There
      are very few nontoxic choices for on-animal control, as most contain either
      synthetic chemicals or essential oils. One of the least risky options is Buck
      Mountain Botanicals Parasite Dust, available thru vets and online (thru
      veterinary suppliers)...and with regular combing, it's possible to use just a very
      small amt of this product, just around the belly and ears/neck where adults tend
      to feed on cats (ie, you don't need to dust the whole cat). // Rosemary
    • Shannon
      Flea comb and vacuuming are wonderful like Rosemary wrote. My latest group of fosters came in with fleas and I was combing and vacuuming, doing a pretty good
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2006
        Flea comb and vacuuming are wonderful like Rosemary wrote. My latest group
        of fosters came in with fleas and I was combing and vacuuming, doing a
        pretty good job of getting rid of them but the shelter wanted me to use
        Frontline just because that is what they use. One of the kittens, Eleanor,
        had a bad reaction. The spot in between her shoulder blades where I applied
        the Frontline was scratched bloody and raw by her within an hour. For over
        two weeks she was crazed trying to get at that spot. It is healed now and
        no more fleas but that would not be my choice to use.

        Shannon
        Daisy: Maine Coon mix, 4-1/2 years old, diagnosed at age 1-1/2, asymptomatic
        HCM, 6.25 mg atenolol and 10 mg CoQ10 daily
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <savionna@...>
        To: <bmusical@...>; <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 11:12 AM
        Subject: Re: [FH] frontline


        > Hi Betty,
        >
        > In a message dated 2/1/06 6:11:38 PM, bmusical@... writes:
        >
        > << Max is starting to scratch and another of my cats was treated for tape
        > worms today. That can mean only one thing in the deep South (Ga) and that
        > is that
        > fleas have made an early appearance. >>
        >
        > Have you combed the both of them to determine if fleas are on the animals?
        >
        > << Is it okay to use Frontline on a cat with HCM? >>
        >
        > I don't know specifically with heart cats. But some caregivers have
        > concerns
        > about using a Class II pesticide that is neurotoxic to mammals (keeping in
        > mind that toxicity is a complicated issue and in part depends on
        > dose)...not only
        > for its effect on the cat but also on the larger environment. Just for my
        > part, I would not be comfortable using a synthetic pesticide on any
        > companion
        > animal.
        >
        > << If not, what is the alternative? >>
        >
        > There are a several relatively safe, nontoxic alternatives...but they
        > require
        > more effort on our part than applying a pesticide on the cat.
        >
        > Fleas have a life cycle...only a small part of which is spent feeding on
        > the
        > animal. The majority of it is spent living in the environment. So an
        > effective
        > way to manage a flea infestation is to manage the environment.
        >
      • Sue at MAGDRL
        When I ve gotten fleas in the house, I used to vacuum every day. It did get rid of them in the house. As for the outdoors, you can have your yard treated
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 2, 2006
          When I've gotten fleas in the house, I used to vacuum every day. It did get
          rid of them in the house. As for the outdoors, you can have your yard
          treated with a pesticide to kill the fleas. Just be sure to keep your cats
          indoors until after a good rain storm.


          Sue

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Shannon" <shannon5@...>
          To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 5:55 PM
          Subject: Re: [FH] frontline


          > Flea comb and vacuuming are wonderful like Rosemary wrote. My latest
          group
          > of fosters came in with fleas and I was combing and vacuuming, doing a
          > pretty good job of getting rid of them but the shelter wanted me to use
          > Frontline just because that is what they use. One of the kittens,
          Eleanor,
          > had a bad reaction. The spot in between her shoulder blades where I
          applied
          > the Frontline was scratched bloody and raw by her within an hour. For
          over
          > two weeks she was crazed trying to get at that spot. It is healed now and
          > no more fleas but that would not be my choice to use.
          >
          > Shannon
          > Daisy: Maine Coon mix, 4-1/2 years old, diagnosed at age 1-1/2,
          asymptomatic
          > HCM, 6.25 mg atenolol and 10 mg CoQ10 daily
          >
        • Betty Seni
          Thanks for all the advice on frontline. I ve given my cats Frontline for years, since the flea problem here in the South is a nighmare, but I will try to
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2006
            Thanks for all the advice on "frontline." I've given my cats Frontline for years, since the flea problem here in the South is a nighmare, but I will try to see what I can do with a flea comb and my trusty vacuum!
            Has there ever been "hard evidence" that Frontline can harm a heart kitty? I'd rather be safe then sorry, since it seems good common sense not to introduce chemicals to a compromised animal. But....I was curious if anyone had ever read something concrete about this . Thanks....






            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Sue at MAGDRL
            To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 8:02 PM
            Subject: Re: [FH] frontline


            When I've gotten fleas in the house, I used to vacuum every day. It did get
            rid of them in the house. As for the outdoors, you can have your yard
            treated with a pesticide to kill the fleas. Just be sure to keep your cats
            indoors until after a good rain storm.


            Sue

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Shannon" <shannon5@...>
            To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 5:55 PM
            Subject: Re: [FH] frontline


            > Flea comb and vacuuming are wonderful like Rosemary wrote. My latest
            group
            > of fosters came in with fleas and I was combing and vacuuming, doing a
            > pretty good job of getting rid of them but the shelter wanted me to use
            > Frontline just because that is what they use. One of the kittens,
            Eleanor,
            > had a bad reaction. The spot in between her shoulder blades where I
            applied
            > the Frontline was scratched bloody and raw by her within an hour. For
            over
            > two weeks she was crazed trying to get at that spot. It is healed now and
            > no more fleas but that would not be my choice to use.
            >
            > Shannon
            > Daisy: Maine Coon mix, 4-1/2 years old, diagnosed at age 1-1/2,
            asymptomatic
            > HCM, 6.25 mg atenolol and 10 mg CoQ10 daily
            >




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