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Re: [FH] Re: Weight loss

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  • Betty Seni
    I want to feed my cats more canned food (without grains) but I find that the premium ones (Wellness, etc) contain cranberry etc..for urinary tract health.
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 1, 2005
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      I want to feed my cats more canned food (without grains) but I find that the premium ones (Wellness, etc) contain "cranberry" etc..for "urinary tract health." Besides my HCM kitty, Max, One of my other cats is now obese after being put on a special prescription diet for Calcium Oxalate stones in his bladder. He had to have surgery to have the stones removed. My understanding is that acidifying the urine can help create an environment for oxalate crystals/stones. (at least with cats who have this propensity....my other cats never got them) Most cats have gotten the other type of crystal (struvite) over the years, and pet food companies have responded by creating a more acidic PH and my understanding is that now they are seeing more of the rarer calcium stones. I can't feed the canned foods I have heard mentioned by the group because of the acidifying cranberries, etc. When a company makes a claim that their food helps with "urinary tract health" I am wary, as they basically mean that the ph of their food is acidic enough to prevent struvite crystals...but, certain cats, like mine, end up with the other,muich more difficult oxalate crystal/stone to deal with. Struvite crystals can be dissolved---calcium oxalate crystals cannot. If they are too large to pass, you end up with surgery. This is an excert from an article called "The truth about dry cat food" from Blakkatz: (article written by Michelle Bernard)
      http://www.blakkatz.com/dryfood.html


      "the current trend towards dry food with urine acidifiers (for urinary tract health according to pet food manufacturers) can cause metabolic acidosis resulting in impaired kidney function and mineral imbalance that includes potassium depletion. Urine that is too acidic provides a good environment for oxalate crystals to form that can cause urinary obstruction. Sturvite crystals, associated with an alkaline urinary ph were once the common form of urinary tract disorder, now calcium oxalate crystals, associated with a more acidic urinary ph, are more common."

      They're talking about dry food here, but I still read the specs on some of the "premium" canned foods and some of them mention the "urinary tract health" stuff....

      ***Wellness" canned food reads: ....."Fresh, whole Cranberries and Blueberries are added to help maintain proper urinary tract health."
      ***"Natural Balnace" canned food reads: ...."All formulas contain cranberry powder as well, which is great for maintaining a healthy urinary tract." (my cat was on this food when he got calcium stones)


      I'm trying to find premium canned food with a balanced ph...but it's hard. Does anyone know anything about this? Most people don't have this issue, but it's a tough one. I'm sorry if this is off the subject...
      Thanks!


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Deena
      To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 3:45 AM
      Subject: [FH] Re: Weight loss


      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "g minnier" <paragem@h...>
      wrote:
      My Bud is 16 lbs and the vet says that is TOO MUCH - in fact, he is
      what she calls "pre-diabetic".

      The easiest way I have found to lose weight in a cat is:
      1. Remove all carbs from diet. Cats need MEAT
      2. Feed small frequent meals
      This is the way cats are biologically designed to eat and it will
      also help his elevated sugar level.

      Wellness and Nature's Variety make canned cat food with no grains.
      Adding real meat is also helpful: either raw or lightly cooked.
      Kibble is THE biggest contributor to obesity and diabetes in my
      eyes. There are no carb free kibbles as it's physically impossible
      to form kibble without carbs to hold it together. So if you feed
      kibble, go lightly.

      Clara was a kibble addict when I adopted her and could have been
      described as a football with a tail. A meat-only diet had her
      trimmed down in no time. It was painless for both of us.
      This summer, I left her with my outlaws while on vacation. I
      returned to a *basketball* with a tail who literally doubled in size
      in 10 days. I left her food, but they chose to feed her kibble. A
      month later, she was once again a lean, mean, fighting machine, once
      I replaced her candy with a species appropriate diet.

      I have not seen prescription diets work for weight loss. Actually,
      I feel they perpetuate the problem. They are full of fiber and will
      add greatly to deposits in your litter box. You are much better off
      with a species appropriate diet, to reduce intake, and increase
      frequency of meals. This boosts metabolism, stabilizes blood sugar,
      and maximizes the immune system so Bud can better handle the other
      things that are going on.

      Good Luck,

      Deena







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    • Sue at MAGDRL
      What I meant by tasting bad is in reference to my girl Pepper who really doesn t like stuff that s fishy. To her, the salmon oil tastes bad just because
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 2 6:00 PM
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        What I meant by "tasting bad" is in reference to my girl Pepper who really
        doesn't like stuff that's fishy. To her, the salmon oil tastes bad just
        because it's fish. I've found that cold temps kill the taste.

        I know it should always be refrigerated. I added that for the people on the
        list who don't know.

        But thank you for following up on those points. It's always good to
        reinforce!


        Sue


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <howdeeeyall@...>
        To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, June 02, 2006 6:56 PM
        Subject: [FH] Re: Weight loss


        >
        > Fish oil should not taste bad. If it has a bitter taste, or a bad feel
        on
        > the tongue, it's rancid and should not be used. Rancid oil will do
        damage
        > instead of helping.
        >
        > Fish oil should always be in the frig! In fact, I won't buy it at a
        store
        > if it's not refrigerated in the store. Whole Foods and places like that
        have
        > a cooler for fish oil, flaxseed oil, etc.
        >
        > I taste the fish oil pretty often to make sure it's not getting rancid.
        Any
        > yucky, sticky feeling on the tongue and it's in the trash.
        >
        > Judith
        >
        > In a message dated 6/2/2006 5:41:50 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        > feline-heart@yahoogroups.com writes:
        >
        > The bottles are big and a bit difficult to use. I pour a bit into an
        empty
        > baby food jar. It's easy to fill the syringe from that, plus you have a
        lid
        > so it doesn't pick up smells in the fridge. (Keep it refrigerated - it
        > lasts longer & doesn't taste quite as bad.)
        >
        >
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