Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Is it a heart problem??

Expand Messages
  • Tamara
    My cat Riley is a spunky and energetic 16 month old orange tabby. For the last 5-6 months my fiance and I notice that when we play with him (and he likes to
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 4, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      My cat Riley is a spunky and energetic 16 month old orange tabby. For
      the last 5-6 months my fiance and I notice that when we play with him
      (and he likes to play HARD)he seems to be breathing very hard (also
      purring like a madman, too). He has had a chest xray, extensive blood
      work and nothing seems to indicate that things are amiss.

      However, lately we notice that he seems to realize that he cant
      run/play hard and seems to pace himself. He will sit down when he's
      winded - almost as if to catch his breath.

      My fiance had a dog when he was a child and he said this reminds him of
      the heart problems the dog had. Apparently it was "fluid around the
      heart". Does anyone have experience with this, or can you please give
      me some guidance.

      Otherwise, Riley seems alert, always ready to play and has a VERY
      healthy appetite. He's weighing in at 13 lbs so we're going to try to
      slim him down to at least 12.

      Thanks for your help.
    • shelly casey
      You should get a ultrasound done to answer your question.....if anything for peace of mind. Good luck, Shelly Tamara wrote: My cat
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 4, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        You should get a ultrasound done to answer your question.....if anything for peace of mind.

        Good luck,
        Shelly

        Tamara <tamarachurch@...> wrote:
        My cat Riley is a spunky and energetic 16 month old orange tabby. For
        the last 5-6 months my fiance and I notice that when we play with him
        (and he likes to play HARD)he seems to be breathing very hard (also
        purring like a madman, too). He has had a chest xray, extensive blood
        work and nothing seems to indicate that things are amiss.

        However, lately we notice that he seems to realize that he cant
        run/play hard and seems to pace himself. He will sit down when he's
        winded - almost as if to catch his breath.

        My fiance had a dog when he was a child and he said this reminds him of
        the heart problems the dog had. Apparently it was "fluid around the
        heart". Does anyone have experience with this, or can you please give
        me some guidance.

        Otherwise, Riley seems alert, always ready to play and has a VERY
        healthy appetite. He's weighing in at 13 lbs so we're going to try to
        slim him down to at least 12.

        Thanks for your help.




        Your reply will go to the author of this message. If you feel your reply will benefit the entire group, please change the "To:" line to feline-heart@yahoogroups.com



        SPONSORED LINKS
        Animal health insurance pet Heart conditions Biology Health product for pet Natural pet health Pet health

        ---------------------------------
        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


        Visit your group "feline-heart" on the web.

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        feline-heart-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        ---------------------------------




        ---------------------------------
        Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sue B
        Tamara, I agree with Shelly. The two things that I know could cause this are asthma and heart disease. Asthma is diagnosed with x-rays so if it didn t show
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 4, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Tamara,

          I agree with Shelly. The two things that I know could cause this are asthma
          and heart disease. Asthma is diagnosed with x-rays so if it didn't show up,
          then it might very well be the beginning of heart disease.

          If you catch it early and begin treatment, it is much better for both you
          and your cat in that your cat may live longer than otherwise and it will
          probably be less expensive to treat.

          If you let it go until it's bad, then your cat (like mine) could go into
          crisis from time to time.

          To find out, get an echocardiogram (sonogram / ultrasound). It's best to
          have it done by a cardiologist since they tend to have better equipment and
          of course are better at reading the results. Plus they know what
          prescriptions to give whereas a regular vet might not. When my cat was
          first diagnosed, they wanted to put her on lasix only. It turns out that
          that's not a good way to treat heart disease.

          You can search for a cardiologist in your area here
          http://www.acvim.org/wwwfp/Diplomate/Cardio/cardio_home.htm or get a
          referral from your vet.


          Sue


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Tamara" <tamarachurch@...>
          To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2005 1:44 PM
          Subject: [FH] Is it a heart problem??


          > My cat Riley is a spunky and energetic 16 month old orange tabby. For
          > the last 5-6 months my fiance and I notice that when we play with him
          > (and he likes to play HARD)he seems to be breathing very hard (also
          > purring like a madman, too). He has had a chest xray, extensive blood
          > work and nothing seems to indicate that things are amiss.
          >
          > However, lately we notice that he seems to realize that he cant
          > run/play hard and seems to pace himself. He will sit down when he's
          > winded - almost as if to catch his breath.
          >
          > My fiance had a dog when he was a child and he said this reminds him of
          > the heart problems the dog had. Apparently it was "fluid around the
          > heart". Does anyone have experience with this, or can you please give
          > me some guidance.
          >
          > Otherwise, Riley seems alert, always ready to play and has a VERY
          > healthy appetite. He's weighing in at 13 lbs so we're going to try to
          > slim him down to at least 12.
          >
          > Thanks for your help.
          >
        • savionna@aol.com
          Hi Tamara, In a message dated 8/4/05 1:45:02 PM, tamarachurch@yahoo.com writes:
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 4, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Tamara,

            In a message dated 8/4/05 1:45:02 PM, tamarachurch@... writes:

            << My cat Riley is a spunky and energetic 16 month old orange tabby. For

            the last 5-6 months my fiance and I notice that when we play with him

            (and he likes to play HARD)he seems to be breathing very hard (also

            purring like a madman, too). He has had a chest xray, extensive blood

            work and nothing seems to indicate that things are amiss. >>

            Is it hot where you are? Does his problem worsen in the heat? Even generally
            healthy cats may pant and breathe hard from vigorous play in hot weather.


            << Otherwise, Riley seems alert, always ready to play and has a VERY

            healthy appetite. He's weighing in at 13 lbs so we're going to try to

            slim him down to at least 12. >>

            What does he eat (brand, flavor, canned or dry)? Dry food, which is high in
            carbohydrate, is a primary contributing factor to overweight and obesity in
            cats...along with a range of other disorders, incl diabetes, chronic urinary
            issues, "allergies," digestive disorders, and dental/gum disorders. These may not
            show up immediately or in a pronounced way (if ever)...but the effect of
            feeding a species-inappropriate diet to an obligate carnivore can be cumulative
            over time. The quality of the diet ("quality" in the nutritional sense, meaning
            the ability of the food to meet the nutritional needs of the consumer) can also
            affect breathing, eg if the cat reacts "allergically" to ingredients in the
            food (sort of similar to how humans can get a stuffy nose, closed throat, etc
            from eating a peanut, cow dairy products, or similar).

            How much does he eat? The feeding guideline for an adult cat is about 20-30
            calories per lb of ideal body weight per day...adjusted for age, activity,
            metabolism, etc. A 12 lb would need about 240-360 calories per day. Most
            high-quality canned foods are about 30-35 calories per oz. There are charts with the
            calorie counts and other nutritional information of common cat foods here:
            www.sugarcats.net/sites/jmpeerson. Cats who eat dry typically gorge more calories
            than they need in an attempt to get nutrients, since the nutrients in dry food
            are not in a form readily available to cats.

            If you're interested, some sites with relatively reliable information on
            feline nutrition incl (#1, 2, 4 have information on the relationship between diet
            and weight):

            1. http://home.earthlink.net/~jacm2/id1.html
            2. www.catinfo.org
            3. www.maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm
            4. http://rocquoone.com/diet_and_health.htm
            5. www.homevet.com/petcare/feedingyourcat.html
            6. www.drsfostersmith.com/general.cfm?siteid=0&gid=74&ref=2066&subref=AN

            // Rosemary
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.