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Re: Advice needed, playing and the HCM cat./2

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  • turkishangoraathumanesociety
    By the way...I should add that you would gasp with fright if you saw some of Lillie s acrobatics sometimes. She will FLY up to the top of the cat tree and
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 2, 2005
      By the way...I should add that you would gasp with fright if you saw
      some of Lillie's acrobatics sometimes. She will FLY up to the top of
      the cat tree and JUMP (from the top) to the ground, and repeat this
      about five times. It's very good cardiovascular exercise and then she
      naps for a while. :)

      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "turkishangoraathumanesociety"
      <turkishangoraathumanesociety@y...> wrote:
      > I used to worry about that ALL the time with Lillie, but was finally
      > told by our (probably exasperated by my neurotic worrying about every
      > little thing) Vet cardiologist: "She's got a heart condition, but she
      > is NOT AN INVALID" lol! He went on to let me know that cats know
      when
      > too much is too much and will rest when they need to. Hope your kitty
      > will do well.
    • Susan
      If my memory serves me from a previous post involving Jen our resident paramedic, a vet told her that if a cat is on atenolol, the sympathetic surge one would
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 2, 2005
        If my memory serves me from a previous post involving
        Jen our resident paramedic, a vet told her that if a
        cat is on atenolol, the sympathetic surge one would
        expect during fear or I'm guessing here, excitement
        would be blocked by the beta-blocker atenolol if the
        cat is on a beta-blocker. I am thinking that both fear
        and fun result in a higher heart rate and that the
        higher heart rate is triggered by the release of
        catecholamines. They call it "fight or flight" and
        both play fighting with another cat and being scared
        by a dog would likely trigger the release of
        norepinephrine.

        Susan

        --- lclarizia@... wrote:

        > Hi Lance,
        >
        > You can't make a relax if it doesn't want to :) I
        > worry about over-exertion too as Baby Boy likes to
        > play with the kitten and they really go to town
        > sometimes.
        >
        > This is going to sound brutal, but ... if, and may
        > it never happen, Boy is going to throw a clot, it's
        > likely to happen whether or not you play with him.
        > So long as you don't over-do it and keep a careful
        > eye on him, let him be as active to the extent he
        > can tolerate it.
        >
        > But I know what you mean about worrying that you'll
        > cause it ... I still freak when Baby Boy and Binx
        > play, although I've learned to leave them alone and
        > only break it up when they start knocking chairs
        > over!
        >
        > Lisa
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Lance Trickey <lancetrickey@...>
        > To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tue, 31 May 2005 12:38:16 -0400
        > Subject: [FH] Advice needed, playing and the HCM
        > cat.
        >
        >
        > My HCM cat , (Boy) loves to play.
        >
        > I know I really can't stop him from chasing ghosts
        > around the house.
        > He is, after all, just being a cat.
        >
        > He pesters me incessantly to play with him when he's
        > feeling good,
        > and is well rested.
        >
        > While I am very careful not to over do it, I am
        > concerned. If my
        > playing with him resulted in his heart throwing a
        > clot , i'd never
        > forgive myself.
        >




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      • Susan
        OK this is human related but surely some vet might be able to do a feline research project since Bush hasn t forbidden feline stem cell research. Perhaps Dr.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 5, 2005
          OK this is human related but surely some vet might be
          able to do a feline research project since Bush hasn't
          forbidden feline stem cell research. Perhaps Dr. Rush
          or Bonagura?

          HEART DISEASE TRIUMPH
          By BRAD HAMILTON

          A top New York doctor says he's made a revolutionary
          breakthrough — using stem cells to reverse terminal
          heart disease in just a few months.

          Dr. Valavanus Subramanian, the chief of cardiovascular
          surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital, yesterday awed a
          medical conference in New York with a report on his
          groundbreaking trial, which was done in Ecuador to
          avoid federal and state regulations limiting the use
          of fetal stem cells.

          "The reason we go offshore is because it's not FDA
          approved," said a member of his team.

          The development brings new hope to the 5 million
          Americans who suffer from congestive heart failure,
          although under current law, they'd have to leave the
          country to be treated.

          The disease is invariably fatal, and can be cured only
          by a transplant.

          "I believe these are very compelling results," said
          Subramanian, one of the world's leading authorities on
          heart disease, who led a three-month clinical trial in
          which 10 patients were injected with fetal stem cells.


          "Heart failure is a terrible malady for which there is
          no solution. We felt this was the right time to go
          into stem-cell therapy."

          The patients, Ecuadorians ranging in age from 44 to
          77, showed rapid improvement, gaining strength and
          endurance as early as one week after the injections,
          Subramanian said.

          After only three months, their hearts were on average
          42 percent stronger, he said.

          One of the patients, a flower saleswoman who worked
          the beaches, was so sick she could barely walk. After
          the treatments, she returned to her sales job.

          "These people were pretty much in cardiac failure,"
          said the doctor, who worked with two Argentine
          surgeons, a stem-cell expert from the Ukraine and
          other leading doctors.

          The stem cells, culled from abortions and ectopic
          pregnancies, came from fetuses five to 12 weeks old.

          The patients, four men and six women, were given 80
          injections directly into their hearts late last year
          at the Luis Vernaza Hospital in Guayaquil.

          One suffered a mild stroke and had to drop out of the
          study, although she made a full recovery, Subramanian
          said. Another was dropped for not complying with a
          post-op regimen.

          The eight that remained underwent a battery of tests,
          including a six-minute walk that measured their speed
          and endurance.

          The private research firm that oversaw the trial, the
          Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Barbados, plans
          to do follow-up work with other patients, said project
          manager Barnett Suskind.

          "It's really exploring a new kind of science, the
          impact of which will change the lives of millions of
          people," he said.




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