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Re: [FH] Maillard reaction and salmonella

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  • Shannon
    I have heard of cats getting sick from mice if the mice were poisoned prior to being caught by the cat. I would imagine that even if the cat didn t eat the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1, 2005
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      I have heard of cats getting sick from mice if the mice were poisoned prior
      to being caught by the cat. I would imagine that even if the cat didn't eat
      the mouse, sinking his teeth into the mouse could transmit something but
      probably not in a large enough amount to cause serious harm.

      Shannon
      Daisy: Maine Coon mix, 4 years old, diagnosed at age 1-1/2, asymptomatic
      HCM, 6.25 mg atenolol daily
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Susan" <somnamblst@...>
      To: "Natalie A. Sera" <nsera@...>; <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 10:02 PM
      Subject: Re: [FH] Maillard reaction and salmonella


      >
      >
      > --- "Natalie A. Sera" <nsera@...> wrote:
      >
      >>
      >> On Jun 1, 2005, at 7:18 PM, Lclarizia@... wrote:
      >>
      >> > In a message dated 6/1/2005 3:12:12 PM Eastern
      >> Daylight Time,
      >> > nsera@... writes:
      >> >> So, what's the Maillard reaction???
      >> >
      >> > It's a heat conversion of carbonyl and amino
      >> groups which result in
      >> > browning of food. There's an explanation here:
      >> >
      >> >
      >>
      > http://www.agsci.ubc.ca/courses/fnh/410/colour/3_82.htm
      >> >
      >> > I believe, though don't quote me on this because
      >> I'd have to double
      >> > check to be sure, the reaction on the free amino
      >> group of taurine
      >> > renders it un-absorbable to the cat and food for
      >> bacteria.
      >>
      >> Well, if it's a browning reaction, and cooked meat
      >> browns both within
      >> and without, it would seem as though cooked meat is
      >> not good for cats.
      >> But if you feed them raw meat, it has the
      >> possibility of being
      >> contaminated with salmonella. How do cats react to
      >> salmonella?
      >> Certainly wild cats eat raw birds and rodents, but I
      >> don't know if they
      >> are salmonella carriers -- however, factory-farmed
      >> chicken is most
      >> definitely a salmonella carrier!! Is it safe to feed
      >> raw, ground turkey
      >> or chicken?
      >>
      >> Natalie ._c>
      >>
      >
      > from:
      >
      > http://www.dvmnews.com/dvm/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=81801
      >
      > "The November/December 2003 issue of the Journal of
      > the American Animal Hospital Association provides a
      > case report detailing the occurrence of septicemic
      > salmonellosis in two cats fed a raw meat diet (Stiver
      > et al. Septicemic Salmonellosis in Two Cats Fed A
      > Raw-Meat Diet. J Am An Hosp Assoc 203;39:538-542.
      > Accessible via www.jaaha.org).
      >
      > The two cats were part of a cattery environment and
      > demonstrated clinical signs of gastrointestinal upset,
      > weight loss, and anorexia that quickly progressed to a
      > moribund clinical state and death. Postmortem
      > examination confirmed septicemic salmonellosis as the
      > underlying etiology with tissue cultures identifying
      > Salmonella typhimurium in one cat, and Salmonella
      > newport in the other. Similar culture results were
      > obtained from the raw food fed to the latter cat."
      >
      > My cat who spent most of yesterday playing with but
      > not eating a live wild mouse (I kept taking it away
      > from him, but somehow he kept finding it or its
      > littermates) is today not feeling well and not eating.
      > I haven't found anything on diseases mice carry that
      > can affect a cat that has not eaten the mouse. Perhaps
      > a coincidence. He did however kill one he found in the
      > house last week, but did not eat them.
      >
      > Susan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • Susan
      I put a little A/D in his mouth last night and this morning he voluntarily ate a small amount of A/D on his own and a couple cat treats. It was my only can of
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2005
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        I put a little A/D in his mouth last night and this
        morning he voluntarily ate a small amount of A/D on
        his own and a couple cat treats. It was my only can of
        A/D and Chester is way too fat to be eating the rest
        of the can if he's not refusing to eat anymore.

        The mouse did not appear to have any puncture wounds
        but Chester definitely carried it in his mouth. It was
        very tiny and not very fast, so I wondered if it was
        either very young or sick. My husband can't understand
        why I wil pick up a live mouse but not a dead one.
        Live mice are cute, dead ones are gross. Besides the
        tail makes a nice handle.

        Susan

        --- Shannon <shannon5@...> wrote:

        > I have heard of cats getting sick from mice if the
        > mice were poisoned prior
        > to being caught by the cat. I would imagine that
        > even if the cat didn't eat
        > the mouse, sinking his teeth into the mouse could
        > transmit something but
        > probably not in a large enough amount to cause
        > serious harm.
        >
        > Shannon
        > Daisy: Maine Coon mix, 4 years old, diagnosed at age
        > 1-1/2, asymptomatic
        > HCM, 6.25 mg atenolol daily
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Susan" <somnamblst@...>
        > To: "Natalie A. Sera" <nsera@...>;
        > <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 10:02 PM
        > Subject: Re: [FH] Maillard reaction and salmonella
        >
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- "Natalie A. Sera" <nsera@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >>
        > >> On Jun 1, 2005, at 7:18 PM, Lclarizia@...
        > wrote:
        > >>
        > >> > In a message dated 6/1/2005 3:12:12 PM Eastern
        > >> Daylight Time,
        > >> > nsera@... writes:
        > >> >> So, what's the Maillard reaction???
        > >> >
        > >> > It's a heat conversion of carbonyl and amino
        > >> groups which result in
        > >> > browning of food. There's an explanation here:
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >
        >
        http://www.agsci.ubc.ca/courses/fnh/410/colour/3_82.htm
        > >> >
        > >> > I believe, though don't quote me on this
        > because
        > >> I'd have to double
        > >> > check to be sure, the reaction on the free
        > amino
        > >> group of taurine
        > >> > renders it un-absorbable to the cat and food
        > for
        > >> bacteria.
        > >>
        > >> Well, if it's a browning reaction, and cooked
        > meat
        > >> browns both within
        > >> and without, it would seem as though cooked meat
        > is
        > >> not good for cats.
        > >> But if you feed them raw meat, it has the
        > >> possibility of being
        > >> contaminated with salmonella. How do cats react
        > to
        > >> salmonella?
        > >> Certainly wild cats eat raw birds and rodents,
        > but I
        > >> don't know if they
        > >> are salmonella carriers -- however,
        > factory-farmed
        > >> chicken is most
        > >> definitely a salmonella carrier!! Is it safe to
        > feed
        > >> raw, ground turkey
        > >> or chicken?
        > >>
        > >> Natalie ._c>
        > >>
        > >
        > > from:
        > >
        > >
        >
        http://www.dvmnews.com/dvm/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=81801
        > >
        > > "The November/December 2003 issue of the Journal
        > of
        > > the American Animal Hospital Association provides
        > a
        > > case report detailing the occurrence of septicemic
        > > salmonellosis in two cats fed a raw meat diet
        > (Stiver
        > > et al. Septicemic Salmonellosis in Two Cats Fed A
        > > Raw-Meat Diet. J Am An Hosp Assoc 203;39:538-542.
        > > Accessible via www.jaaha.org).
        > >
        > > The two cats were part of a cattery environment
        > and
        > > demonstrated clinical signs of gastrointestinal
        > upset,
        > > weight loss, and anorexia that quickly progressed
        > to a
        > > moribund clinical state and death. Postmortem
        > > examination confirmed septicemic salmonellosis as
        > the
        > > underlying etiology with tissue cultures
        > identifying
        > > Salmonella typhimurium in one cat, and Salmonella
        > > newport in the other. Similar culture results were
        > > obtained from the raw food fed to the latter cat."
        > >
        > > My cat who spent most of yesterday playing with
        > but
        > > not eating a live wild mouse (I kept taking it
        > away
        > > from him, but somehow he kept finding it or its
        > > littermates) is today not feeling well and not
        > eating.
        > > I haven't found anything on diseases mice carry
        > that
        > > can affect a cat that has not eaten the mouse.
        > Perhaps
        > > a coincidence. He did however kill one he found in
        > the
        > > house last week, but did not eat them.
        > >
        > > Susan
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >

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