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CoQ10 info

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  • vickie
    This is info that I have collected around the net. As to how many mg for cat varies. I ve read 10 mg, up to 150mg. Don t know much more, but this info below
    Message 1 of 3 , May 2, 2005
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      This is info that I have collected around the net. As to how many mg for cat varies. I've read 10 mg, up to 150mg.
      Don't know much more, but this info below can tell you what it is good for. I want to use it on Baby, cause it can help
      in so many ways for him. Even help bring his BG numbers down.



      We know: All About Coenzyme Q-10
      What is coenzyme Q-10?

      Coenzyme -10 is a compound that is made naturally in the body and is used by cells to produce energy needed for cell growth and maintenance. It is also used by the body as an antioxidant.

      Why do researchers think coenzyme Q-10 is valuable?

      Studies have yielded information about how coenzyme Q-10 works in the body to produce energy and act as an antioxidant. Some studies have suggested that coenzyme -10 stimulates the immune system and increases resistance to disease.
      In part because of this, researchers have theorized that coenzyme -10 may be useful as an adjuvant therapy for cancer.






      How do you take coenzyme Q-10?
      Coenzyme Q-0 is usually taken by mouth as a pill (tablet or capsule). It may also be given by injection into a vein.





      Where is coenzyme Q-10 available?
      Several companies distribute coenzyme Q-10 as a dietary supplement.
      In the United States, dietary supplements are regulated as foods, not drugs. This means that evaluation and approval by the FDA are not required before marketing, unless specific health claims are made about the supplement.

      It should be noted that, because dietary supplements are not formally reviewed for manufacturing consistency, there may be variation in the composition of the supplement from one batch to another.






      Have any side effects or risks been reported from coenzyme Q-10?
      No serious side effects have been reported from the use of coenzyme Q-10. Some patients using coenzyme Q-10 have experienced mild insomnia, elevated levels of liver enzymes, rashes, nausea, and upper abdominal pain. Other reported side effects have included dizziness, visual sensitivity to light, irritability, headache, heartburn, and fatigue.
      Patients should talk with their health care provider about possible interactions between coenzyme Q-10 and prescription drugs they may be taking.

      The National Cancer Institute provided help in preparing this article.

      CoQ10 (Coenzyme Q10) Dosage Information

      CoQ10 is sold in the United States as a nutritional supplement. Thus, there are no established dosage guidelines. Adults typically use a CoQ10 supplement that provides between 30-100 mg per day, although people with specific health conditions may supplement with higher levels (with the involvement of a physician). Most of the research clinical studies conducted on heart conditions have used 60-150 mg of CoQ10 per day.

      Studies indicate that preventive dosage for patients with cardiovascular concerns or those taking one of the statin drugs to lower cholesterol, is between 30 mg and 150 mg/day, while cancer patients or patients with compromised immune function may require higher dosage.

      A clinical study published in 1994 shows a dose dependent relationship in the effects of CoQ10 treatment for women with high-risk breast cancer. In one patient, during therapy for about one year with 90 mg. of CoQ10 daily, the tumor "stabilized". When the dose was increased to 390 mg. daily, after one month the tumor was no longer palpable. After another month, mammography confirmed the tumor was no longer present (Lockwood, K., Moesgaard, S., Flokers, K., "Partial and Complete Regression of Breast Cancer in Patients in Relation to Dosage of CoEnzyme Q10" Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 199, No. 3:1504-1508, 1994.)

      People with cancer who consider taking much higher amounts should discuss this issue with a doctor before supplementing. There are several anecdotal reports of large amounts of CoQ10 resulting in improvements in certain types of cancer. However, controlled trials are needed to confirm these preliminary observations.

      Most doctors recommend that CoQ10 be taken with meals to improve absorption. Generally it takes one to three months to experience benefits from supplementation, and as long as six months for maximal effects to occur.


      Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Side Effects

      CoQ10 is well tolerated in most patients. Clinical studies mentioned here show that 100-200 mg per day rarely had any adverse side effects. For example, an Italian study conducted on the safety and efficacy of CoQ10 in the treatment of heart failure, 78% of patients received 100 mg per day and 22% received 50-150 mg per day. Ten adverse reactions were reported by 8 out of 1,113 patients studied (Baggio et al., 1993)

      However, a study conducted investigating the effectiveness in the treatment of Huntington's disease where high doses of 600 mg to 1200 mg per day were used, some patients report headache, heartburn, fatigue, and increased involuntary movements (Feigin et al., 1994)

      A study conducted with 200 mg 4 times per day for the treatment of Parkinson's disease reported "mild, transient changes in the urine" (Shults et al., 1998).

      Coenzyme Q10 may change the insulin requirements of people with diabetes. Talk to your physician if you have diabetes and are planning to take CoQ10.

      Another sites info:

      Are there side effects of COQ10? After all, many nutrients and supplements that have a great deal of health benefits can also have adverse effects.

      Overall, COQ10 appears to be a very safe nutrient...and, in fact, our bodies produce it naturally, even though certain people can become deficient in it.

      In addition, we tend to produce less and less of it as we age, which is why a great many people are looking into supplementation with COQ10 and wisely educating themselves on and potential side effects of COQ10.

      Although there is no RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) set for COQ10, most people who use it take a dosage between 30mg to 100mg per day.

      People with certain health conditions, such as angina, congestive heart failure, parkinson's, or kidney failure often take more -- 150 mg to 200 mg per day or even higher.

      Even doses of up to 400 mg per day are used without much reports of any significant COQ10 side effects. However, this doesn't mean you should take a high dosage. More is not always better.

      Moreover, you should always consult your physician before taking supplements of any kind.

      Side effects of COQ10, though rare, range from: dizziness, nausea, insomnia, and headaches.

      People who suffer from diabetes should watch their blood sugar carefully when using COQ10 because their glucose levels can drop while using this supplement.

      Moreover, people on warfarin (a prescription blood thinner) need to consult with their physician to have their blood test results monitored frequently if they intend to use COQ10 because COQ10 side effects can interact/interfere with the functioning of this drug.



      CoQ10 and Cancer Treatment

      As mentioned in our brief history of CoQ10, interest in CoQ10 as a cancer treatment arose in the early 1960's, when it was noticed that Co10 was deficient in cancer patients. CoQ10 was especially deficient in those with breast cancer. A subsequent study showed significant relationships between the severity of plasma coenzyme Q10 deficiency and breast cancer.

      Data since has shown that CoQ10 stimulates immune systems, resulting in increased antibody levels, greater numbers and activities of macrophages and T cells. Macrophages, like those present in Coenzyme Q10, are immune cells that act as phagocytes, an antigen-presenting cell, and an important source of immune secretions.

      It should be noted that since CoQ10 occurs naturally in the body and is treated as a nutritional supplement, CoQ10 has not been approved by the FDA as a treatment for cancer - and you should always consult your medical professional before seeking your own treatment of any illness, especially in the case of severe illnesses like cancer.

      A Brief History of CoQ10 as a Cancer Treatment
      Research for using coenzyme Q10 as a treatment for cancer began in 1961, when a deficiency of the coenzyme was noted in cancer patients. Low blood levels of CoQ10 have been found in patients with cancers of the breast, lung, prostate, pancreas, colon, kidney, head and neck, and in patients with myeloma, and lymphoma.

      Numerous studies have since been conducted on the benefits of CoQ10 as an adjuvant therapy for cancer. Since CoQ10 stimulates the immune system and boosts resistances, it is seen as an effective followup therapy to main cancer treatments.

      Benefits of CoQ10 Analogs in Cancer Treatment
      CoQ10 has been shown to combat cancer indirectly by boosting the immune system, acting as an antioxidant, increasing resistances, and replacing the naturally occurring Coenzyme Q10 lost in cancer patients. Analogs of CoQ10, on the other hand, have been shown to combat cancer growth directly. Analogs of CoQ10 are compounds that act like CoQ10, but are not molecularly identical. Analogs of CoQ10 have been shown to slow the spread of cancer cells and the growth of cancer cells in some non-human studies.

      These studies indicate that CoQ10 analogs may act as an antimetabolite in cancerous cells - that is, a compound that slows metabolic processes such as cell growth and division. In preventing cells from properly conducting their metabolic processes, CoQ10 analogs can prevent the spread and growth of cancer cells. This makes CoQ10 analogs especially useful as an adjuvant therapy to chemotherapeutic agents.

      CoQ10 and T-Cells
      It's been shown that CoQ10 leads to more antibodies, macrophages and T cells. Studies reportedly have shown that CoQ10 increases immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels and the CD4 to CD8 T-cell ratio in humans.

      CD4 and CD8, whose development is increased by the presence of CoQ10, are proteins found on the surface of T cells. CD4 and CD8 identify helper T-cells and cytotoxic T-cells, respectively; decreased CD4 to CD8 T-cell ratios have been reported for cancer patients.

      coq10 : antioxidant for the heart
      Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, Vitamin Q10) is a powerful antioxidant crucial for the production of cellular energy. CoQ10 is found in highest concentrations in the heart, where it increases circulation, metabolizes fats, andmaintains the flexibility of cell membranes. CoQ10 is good for heart health, energy, and immunity. More information on CoQ10



      Vickie Junger

      Beware of ISS/VAS cancer that kills cats! www.vas-awareness.org
      Don't give shots in the SCRUFF. www.catshots.com
      In memory of Angel ONYX 12/27/02 and Smudge 5/01/04
      Beware of Feline Diabetes !!!



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vickie
      This is info that I have collected on the web. I have read that animals can have 30mg for every 15lbs. I more then 15lbs, then to break it up day and night.
      Message 2 of 3 , May 16, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        This is info that I have collected on the web. I have read that animals can have 30mg for every 15lbs. I more then
        15lbs, then to break it up day and night.
        We know: All About Coenzyme Q-10
        What is coenzyme Q-10?

        Coenzyme -10 is a compound that is made naturally in the body and is used by cells to produce energy needed for cell growth and maintenance. It is also used by the body as an antioxidant.

        Why do researchers think coenzyme Q-10 is valuable?

        Studies have yielded information about how coenzyme Q-10 works in the body to produce energy and act as an antioxidant. Some studies have suggested that coenzyme -10 stimulates the immune system and increases resistance to disease.
        In part because of this, researchers have theorized that coenzyme -10 may be useful as an adjuvant therapy for cancer.






        How do you take coenzyme Q-10?
        Coenzyme Q-0 is usually taken by mouth as a pill (tablet or capsule). It may also be given by injection into a vein.





        Where is coenzyme Q-10 available?
        Several companies distribute coenzyme Q-10 as a dietary supplement.
        In the United States, dietary supplements are regulated as foods, not drugs. This means that evaluation and approval by the FDA are not required before marketing, unless specific health claims are made about the supplement.

        It should be noted that, because dietary supplements are not formally reviewed for manufacturing consistency, there may be variation in the composition of the supplement from one batch to another.






        Have any side effects or risks been reported from coenzyme Q-10?
        No serious side effects have been reported from the use of coenzyme Q-10. Some patients using coenzyme Q-10 have experienced mild insomnia, elevated levels of liver enzymes, rashes, nausea, and upper abdominal pain. Other reported side effects have included dizziness, visual sensitivity to light, irritability, headache, heartburn, and fatigue.
        Patients should talk with their health care provider about possible interactions between coenzyme Q-10 and prescription drugs they may be taking.

        The National Cancer Institute provided help in preparing this article.

        CoQ10 (Coenzyme Q10) Dosage Information

        CoQ10 is sold in the United States as a nutritional supplement. Thus, there are no established dosage guidelines. Adults typically use a CoQ10 supplement that provides between 30-100 mg per day, although people with specific health conditions may supplement with higher levels (with the involvement of a physician). Most of the research clinical studies conducted on heart conditions have used 60-150 mg of CoQ10 per day.

        Studies indicate that preventive dosage for patients with cardiovascular concerns or those taking one of the statin drugs to lower cholesterol, is between 30 mg and 150 mg/day, while cancer patients or patients with compromised immune function may require higher dosage.

        A clinical study published in 1994 shows a dose dependent relationship in the effects of CoQ10 treatment for women with high-risk breast cancer. In one patient, during therapy for about one year with 90 mg. of CoQ10 daily, the tumor "stabilized". When the dose was increased to 390 mg. daily, after one month the tumor was no longer palpable. After another month, mammography confirmed the tumor was no longer present (Lockwood, K., Moesgaard, S., Flokers, K., "Partial and Complete Regression of Breast Cancer in Patients in Relation to Dosage of CoEnzyme Q10" Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 199, No. 3:1504-1508, 1994.)

        People with cancer who consider taking much higher amounts should discuss this issue with a doctor before supplementing. There are several anecdotal reports of large amounts of CoQ10 resulting in improvements in certain types of cancer. However, controlled trials are needed to confirm these preliminary observations.

        Most doctors recommend that CoQ10 be taken with meals to improve absorption. Generally it takes one to three months to experience benefits from supplementation, and as long as six months for maximal effects to occur.


        Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Side Effects

        CoQ10 is well tolerated in most patients. Clinical studies mentioned here show that 100-200 mg per day rarely had any adverse side effects. For example, an Italian study conducted on the safety and efficacy of CoQ10 in the treatment of heart failure, 78% of patients received 100 mg per day and 22% received 50-150 mg per day. Ten adverse reactions were reported by 8 out of 1,113 patients studied (Baggio et al., 1993)

        However, a study conducted investigating the effectiveness in the treatment of Huntington's disease where high doses of 600 mg to 1200 mg per day were used, some patients report headache, heartburn, fatigue, and increased involuntary movements (Feigin et al., 1994)

        A study conducted with 200 mg 4 times per day for the treatment of Parkinson's disease reported "mild, transient changes in the urine" (Shults et al., 1998).

        Coenzyme Q10 may change the insulin requirements of people with diabetes. Talk to your physician if you have diabetes and are planning to take CoQ10.

        Another sites info:

        Are there side effects of COQ10? After all, many nutrients and supplements that have a great deal of health benefits can also have adverse effects.

        Overall, COQ10 appears to be a very safe nutrient...and, in fact, our bodies produce it naturally, even though certain people can become deficient in it.

        In addition, we tend to produce less and less of it as we age, which is why a great many people are looking into supplementation with COQ10 and wisely educating themselves on and potential side effects of COQ10.

        Although there is no RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) set for COQ10, most people who use it take a dosage between 30mg to 100mg per day.

        People with certain health conditions, such as angina, congestive heart failure, parkinson's, or kidney failure often take more -- 150 mg to 200 mg per day or even higher.

        Even doses of up to 400 mg per day are used without much reports of any significant COQ10 side effects. However, this doesn't mean you should take a high dosage. More is not always better.

        Moreover, you should always consult your physician before taking supplements of any kind.

        Side effects of COQ10, though rare, range from: dizziness, nausea, insomnia, and headaches.

        People who suffer from diabetes should watch their blood sugar carefully when using COQ10 because their glucose levels can drop while using this supplement.

        Moreover, people on warfarin (a prescription blood thinner) need to consult with their physician to have their blood test results monitored frequently if they intend to use COQ10 because COQ10 side effects can interact/interfere with the functioning of this drug.



        CoQ10 and Cancer Treatment

        As mentioned in our brief history of CoQ10, interest in CoQ10 as a cancer treatment arose in the early 1960's, when it was noticed that Co10 was deficient in cancer patients. CoQ10 was especially deficient in those with breast cancer. A subsequent study showed significant relationships between the severity of plasma coenzyme Q10 deficiency and breast cancer.

        Data since has shown that CoQ10 stimulates immune systems, resulting in increased antibody levels, greater numbers and activities of macrophages and T cells. Macrophages, like those present in Coenzyme Q10, are immune cells that act as phagocytes, an antigen-presenting cell, and an important source of immune secretions.

        It should be noted that since CoQ10 occurs naturally in the body and is treated as a nutritional supplement, CoQ10 has not been approved by the FDA as a treatment for cancer - and you should always consult your medical professional before seeking your own treatment of any illness, especially in the case of severe illnesses like cancer.

        A Brief History of CoQ10 as a Cancer Treatment
        Research for using coenzyme Q10 as a treatment for cancer began in 1961, when a deficiency of the coenzyme was noted in cancer patients. Low blood levels of CoQ10 have been found in patients with cancers of the breast, lung, prostate, pancreas, colon, kidney, head and neck, and in patients with myeloma, and lymphoma.

        Numerous studies have since been conducted on the benefits of CoQ10 as an adjuvant therapy for cancer. Since CoQ10 stimulates the immune system and boosts resistances, it is seen as an effective followup therapy to main cancer treatments.

        Benefits of CoQ10 Analogs in Cancer Treatment
        CoQ10 has been shown to combat cancer indirectly by boosting the immune system, acting as an antioxidant, increasing resistances, and replacing the naturally occurring Coenzyme Q10 lost in cancer patients. Analogs of CoQ10, on the other hand, have been shown to combat cancer growth directly. Analogs of CoQ10 are compounds that act like CoQ10, but are not molecularly identical. Analogs of CoQ10 have been shown to slow the spread of cancer cells and the growth of cancer cells in some non-human studies.

        These studies indicate that CoQ10 analogs may act as an antimetabolite in cancerous cells - that is, a compound that slows metabolic processes such as cell growth and division. In preventing cells from properly conducting their metabolic processes, CoQ10 analogs can prevent the spread and growth of cancer cells. This makes CoQ10 analogs especially useful as an adjuvant therapy to chemotherapeutic agents.

        CoQ10 and T-Cells
        It's been shown that CoQ10 leads to more antibodies, macrophages and T cells. Studies reportedly have shown that CoQ10 increases immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels and the CD4 to CD8 T-cell ratio in humans.

        CD4 and CD8, whose development is increased by the presence of CoQ10, are proteins found on the surface of T cells. CD4 and CD8 identify helper T-cells and cytotoxic T-cells, respectively; decreased CD4 to CD8 T-cell ratios have been reported for cancer patients.

        coq10 : antioxidant for the heart
        Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, Vitamin Q10) is a powerful antioxidant crucial for the production of cellular energy. CoQ10 is found in highest concentrations in the heart, where it increases circulation, metabolizes fats, andmaintains the flexibility of cell membranes. CoQ10 is good for heart health, energy, and immunity. More information on CoQ10



        Vickie and Baby

        Beware of ISS/VAS cancer that kills cats! www.vas-awareness.org
        Don't give shots in the SCRUFF. www.catshots.com
        In memory of Angel ONYX 12/27/02 and Smudge 5/01/04
        Beware of Feline Diabetes !!!



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lynn
        Thanks for the info on the CQ10 and the heart meds Vicky. Much appreciated. :-) I m starting to accumulate a pretty thick file on all this stuff! Lynn & Teegan
        Message 3 of 3 , May 17, 2005
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          Thanks for the info on the CQ10 and the heart meds Vicky.
          Much appreciated. :-)
          I'm starting to accumulate a pretty thick file on all this stuff!

          Lynn & Teegan
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