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Re: [FH] is febreeze safe?

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  • savionna@aol.com
    Hi Marthe, In a message dated 4/25/05 10:47:50 AM, marthehorndavis@yahoo.ca writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2005
      Hi Marthe,

      In a message dated 4/25/05 10:47:50 AM, marthehorndavis@... writes:

      << I have heard controversy about Febreeze a supposedly
      safe product...Anyone know... >>

      The controversy aside, it boils down to this. Cats have very sensitive
      noses...with at least twice as many olfactory receptors as we do (we have at least 5
      million); plus cats have the Jacobson's organ, which detects pheromones and
      perhaps other volatile chemicals in minute amts that we're not aware of. The
      cat's nose is just a few inches off the ground. Cats have also evolved in a
      relatively narrow niche without constant exposure to multiple environmental toxins
      (or potential toxins)...at least nothing on the scale to which they are
      exposed in the human environment (detergents, pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides,
      dyes, paints, perfumes, floor finishes, etc)...so their little 10 lb bodies
      have limited "defenses" against a range of chemicals that our 100-200 lb bodies
      generally shrug off.

      So, whatever we can do to limit their exposure to strong smells and "foreign"
      chemicals in the environment (the entire environment is chemical, so I mean
      here ones that are not naturally present and/or recognized as toxic), the less
      stress on the cat's bodies.

      Procter + Gamble's reason for being is to sell products...not all of which
      are necessary or even useful for human and cat existence, and some of which may
      be potentially harmful. And I have no doubt that they "tested" Febreeze so
      that they could say it was "safe," but without knowing who tested, what the
      standards for the test were, how long the test was conducted, what state of health
      the cats were in before testing, what parameters were tested, etc, their claim
      is essentially meaningless.

      So, the rule of thumb is to evaluate which products we need to lead full,
      healthy lives, balancing our need for convenience and the cat's needs for a
      nontoxic environment against mfrs' need to make money. Do we really need a "fabric
      freshener"? Many times, with a little brain energy, we can come up with a solu
      tion to most problems that does not involve manufactured products with
      synthetic chemicals. Eg, baking soda is an excellent natural deoderant...so is fresh
      air, sunshine, and soap and water. // Rosemary
    • brinkett
      Rosemary: Very informative post. Just to add another experience, not about Febreeze specifically. One of our three cats has always had a higher than normal
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 26, 2005
        Rosemary: Very informative post.

        Just to add another experience, not about Febreeze specifically.
        One of our three cats has always had a higher than normal
        respiration rate. We did have an ultrasound done and it was normal,
        and she is a former feral cat and a nervous nellie, and she's still
        fine 3 years later, so we've come to the conclusion that her rate is
        normal for her and we don't worry about it anymore.

        But when we were initially investigating it, one of the possible
        causes the vet discussed with us was respiratory irritation due to
        stuff we use around the house. For example, he told us to stop
        using fabric softener when doing laundry, which we did, and haven't
        used since. Also the usual stuff, like dust and household cleaners
        (we now use only natural formulas). We also stopped using Febreeze.

        I do think the changes we've made have been beneficial for all
        occupants, human and feline.

        Sarah.

        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, savionna@a... wrote:
        > Hi Marthe,
        >
        > In a message dated 4/25/05 10:47:50 AM, marthehorndavis@y...
        writes:
        >
        > << I have heard controversy about Febreeze a supposedly
        > safe product...Anyone know... >>
        >
        > The controversy aside, it boils down to this. Cats have very
        sensitive
        > noses...with at least twice as many olfactory receptors as we do
        (we have at least 5
        > million); plus cats have the Jacobson's organ, which detects
        pheromones and
        > perhaps other volatile chemicals in minute amts that we're not
        aware of. The
        > cat's nose is just a few inches off the ground. Cats have also
        evolved in a
        > relatively narrow niche without constant exposure to multiple
        environmental toxins
        > (or potential toxins)...at least nothing on the scale to which
        they are
        > exposed in the human environment (detergents, pesticides,
        fertilizers, herbicides,
        > dyes, paints, perfumes, floor finishes, etc)...so their little 10
        lb bodies
        > have limited "defenses" against a range of chemicals that our 100-
        200 lb bodies
        > generally shrug off.
        >
        > So, whatever we can do to limit their exposure to strong smells
        and "foreign"
        > chemicals in the environment (the entire environment is chemical,
        so I mean
        > here ones that are not naturally present and/or recognized as
        toxic), the less
        > stress on the cat's bodies.
        >
        > Procter + Gamble's reason for being is to sell products...not all
        of which
        > are necessary or even useful for human and cat existence, and some
        of which may
        > be potentially harmful. And I have no doubt that they "tested"
        Febreeze so
        > that they could say it was "safe," but without knowing who tested,
        what the
        > standards for the test were, how long the test was conducted, what
        state of health
        > the cats were in before testing, what parameters were tested, etc,
        their claim
        > is essentially meaningless.
        >
        > So, the rule of thumb is to evaluate which products we need to
        lead full,
        > healthy lives, balancing our need for convenience and the cat's
        needs for a
        > nontoxic environment against mfrs' need to make money. Do we
        really need a "fabric
        > freshener"? Many times, with a little brain energy, we can come up
        with a solu
        > tion to most problems that does not involve manufactured products
        with
        > synthetic chemicals. Eg, baking soda is an excellent natural
        deoderant...so is fresh
        > air, sunshine, and soap and water. // Rosemary
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