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Re: [FH] Breathing/Fluid Question

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  • mahedabel
    I think the DDL-1 probably indicates that it s the Dandelion leaf and not root. I want to try Dandelion for Hotspie too and have been reading about it.
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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      I think the DDL-1 probably indicates that it's the Dandelion leaf and
      not root. I want to try Dandelion for Hotspie too and have been
      reading about it. Apparently the leaf is the part that's best used
      as a diuretic. If you don't mind, please let me know how it works
      for Pepper!

      michelle & hots
    • Sue B
      They do have a dandelion leaf product and that s DLL as opposed to DDL. I ll try to call tomorrow and find the difference between DDL and DDL-1. I ll let you
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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        They do have a dandelion leaf product and that's DLL as opposed to DDL. I'll try to call tomorrow and find the difference between DDL and DDL-1.

        I'll let you know how it works.


        Sue






        I think the DDL-1 probably indicates that it's the Dandelion leaf and
        not root. I want to try Dandelion for Hotspie too and have been
        reading about it. Apparently the leaf is the part that's best used
        as a diuretic. If you don't mind, please let me know how it works
        for Pepper!

        michelle & hots





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Donna M Speckman
        Hi Michelle, Certainly the fluid accumulation would appear to be the most likely cause of Hotspie s juicy purrs, but there may be something separate going on
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 2, 2005
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          Hi Michelle,
          Certainly the fluid accumulation would appear to be the most likely cause
          of Hotspie's "juicy" purrs, but there may be something separate going on
          as well. Have you had Hotspie checked out for any kind of upper
          respiratory illness or had his throat or nasal passages scoped to see if
          there is any inflammation or obstruction? My Rosie exhibited the same
          "gurgling/choking purr" symptoms over a period of several months last
          year, and it turned out that she had two problems: a chronic herpes virus
          infection and a severe Bartonella infection. Rosie symptoms, other than
          the choking purr, were vague. She did not exhibit any eye or nasal
          discharge, and only sneezed occasionally. We treated the Bartonella with
          3 weeks of azythromycin, and the herpes with L-lysine (250mg BID). I'm
          not sure which of these illnesses was primarily responsible for Rosie's
          gurgling purr, but after treating these two illnesses, the purring problem
          resolved, and Rosie is back to being a non-stop motorboat.

          Hotspur's purr symptoms may indeed be related to his heart issues, but you
          might want to check out other possible causes as well, just in case.

          Glad to hear Hotspie is doing much better,
          Donna and Angels Mooch and Buster, Angel Soulmate Chiquita, and the rest
          of the gang: Rosie, Lily, Natalie, and Pablo


          <Hi. Hotspur has been taking 5mg of furosemide daily for the past
          week (before that it was 5mg EOD) plus 6.25mg Spironolactone daily
          for a couple months. He seems much better since he started the daily
          furosemide except when he purrs. When he purrs he sounds like he's
          blowing bubbles under water and then he will swallow hard and as he
          swallows his head juts forward. He eventually just stops the
          purring. I have called our cardiologist about this but haven't had a
          call back yet. Does anyone know what this might be? Is it fluid?
          Other than this, Hotspie seems really good - eating very well,
          drinking lots and very social. The purring problem is very upsetting
          for both of us because he likes to lay on my chest and be petted but
          that causes purring. This morning I told him he doesn't have to purr
          for me to know he loves me and he stopped for a while but then he
          started again and finally had to lay on the bed next to me instead.
          I feel like our vets have just given up on us.

          Thank you!

          Michelle & Hotspie>



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        • Deena
          Interesting thread guys. I d like to make a few comments. Recognizing signs of fluid build-up: It s nice to see so many people discussing how they determine
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 2, 2005
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            Interesting thread guys. I'd like to make a few comments.

            Recognizing signs of fluid build-up:
            It's nice to see so many people discussing how they determine when
            fluid is beginning to build. This is one of the most important
            tricks you can learn. Each kitty will be different, but it is so
            important in managing this disease. For Mr Pepe, his chest would
            expand. You wouldn't notice it by looking, but his harness would
            begin to get tighter. So I took a magic marker and put 3 lines on
            his harness to indicate severity: ok, start to watch, and holy-
            sh*t.

            Purring:
            I know you were kidding about trying to prevent the kitty from
            purring since it sounded painful. But are folks aware that purring
            is a way cats use to heal? A gypsy saying is, "have a bone that
            won't heal, surround yourself with purring cats". Studies have
            shown that the frequency that cat's purr at, speeds the bodies
            ability to heal. Hospitals are now using sound therapy based on
            kitty purrs. So you want your kitty to purr as much as possible.
            People always equate purring with contentment. But a cat will purr
            when very sick and uncomfortable as a way to self-medicate. It was
            one of the tools I used to tell me Mr Pepe was ready for help over
            the bridge. When he stopped purring, I felt he was no longer trying
            to heal himself and wanted to cross.

            Dandelion as a diuretic:
            I've noticed talk of vets prescribing dandelion ROOT as a diuretic.
            Whole Dog Journal just did an article on heart disease and also
            mentioned root. According to my herbal books and the research I did
            last year, for maximum diuretic action you want to use the LEAF.
            The root is the liver/kidney tonic and the flower the analgesic. I
            haven't needed to pay attention to new findings, so I'm wondering if
            this is a recent discovery. I even reviewed this with Mary Tilford
            who is pretty much the herbal DVM queen on these things. She told
            me that I wanted leaf for the diuretic, but the other components
            were also helpful. I used a whole plant glycerine formula (no
            alcohol)to start. Towards the end I found the liquid too short
            acting, so added a leaf-only pill at night. I'm not trying to
            second guess anyone's vet, I just want to find out if ROOT is now
            the recommend diuretic so I stop telling people leaf.
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