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Re: [FH] CoQ10 Questions

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  • lclarizia@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/27/2005 9:23:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Baby Boy gets about 30 mgs, twice a day, combined with his other supplements. I say about
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 30, 2005
      In a message dated 1/27/2005 9:23:31 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      lovesmainecoons@... writes:


      > My question is: How much do you give your cats and in what form?
      > And do you need to get your Vet's or Cardiologist's approval for
      > giving this?

      Baby Boy gets about 30 mgs, twice a day, combined with his other supplements.
      I say "about" because he won't eat it if I try to hide it in food, so I have
      to syringe it in, and he spits some out. I give him the oil-based, gel-cap
      form -- I cut open the gelcap and squeeze it out.

      CoQ10 is fat-soluble, and to work, must be either suspended in fat (oil) or
      given with fat/oil, otherwise it will not be fully absorbed. As far as anyone
      knows, it's safe and non-toxic, even at high dosages. In itself, it should
      not interfere with any meds. Much of the human-based literature suggests that
      combining it with the amino acid L-carnitine increased it's efficacy.

      As for veterinary approval -- you don't need anyone's permission to
      supplement your cat. My vet thinks it's fine and at the very least, can't hurt, the
      cardiologist thinks it won't do any good and says "there's no real evidence ...
      blah blah blah" but in the end, so what? My cat's heart is failing ... if
      there's even a remote chance it could help and no evidence it will hurt, I'm
      going to try it.

      I swear by it. Baby Boy is getting a supplement cocktail consisting of
      CoQ10, taurine, l-carnitine, creatine, selenium and vitamins A, B1, B6, C and E,
      syringed in twice a day. These are all supplements I found by mining human
      literature on human DCM, all of them (except creatine) are involved as factors in
      electron-transport and oxidative phosphorylation, and all of them increase the
      available energy to heart cells (except creatine, given orally it only helps
      skeletal muscle but it's in there to support his general health), which at the
      very least, make the heart more efficient and at the most, can help the heart
      remodel itself into a more normal physical state.

      I won't know what it's doing for his heart for a few weeks yet, when we go
      back to the cardiologist, but empirically -- he has tons of energy, chases the
      kitten all over the place, eats ravenously and in general, acts like he did
      before he was diagnosed. That's good enough for me.

      Lisa


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