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Re: [FH] Compounding meds

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  • Sarah
    What does compounding medication mean? I put my cat s medicine (diltiazem and lasix) into a gel cap so I only have to pill him once. Also, the lasix is so
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 7, 2004
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      What does "compounding medication" mean? I put my cat's medicine
      (diltiazem and lasix) into a gel cap so I only have to pill him
      once. Also, the lasix is so small, it is hard to know if it is in
      his mouth of actually went down his throat.

      After my cat's last ultrasound, his medication was switched. He now
      takes 1/3 of a 140 mg sustained release capsule.

      SAB (Sarah)
    • g minnier
      I m not a vet or pharmacist but my understanding of and experience with compounding medications is this: Compounding includes changing the form of the
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 7, 2004
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        I'm not a vet or pharmacist but my understanding of and experience with
        compounding medications is this: Compounding includes changing the form of
        the medication, i.e., changing pills to liquid or a gel or putting the
        medication into a different delivery vehicle (like making a pill into a
        capsule). The pharmacist doesn't actually grind up pills and suspend them
        in a liquid but has access to the medication in a form that allows for
        making it liquid, solid, gel or whatever. It also involves mixing
        medications (if that is appropriate) and making several medications into
        one, llike I have atenolol and enalapril compounded together so I only have
        to give one medicine and I have them made into a liquid so it's easier for
        me to administer. Hope that helps, I'm sure some of more experienced
        members have a better explanation.
        Gwen
      • Sue B
        From my best understanding, compounding a medication means to mix it with something else. I ve had antibiotics compounded into a transdermal cream. Then I
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 7, 2004
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          From my best understanding, compounding a medication means to mix it with something else. I've had antibiotics compounded into a transdermal cream. Then I had to rub the cream on her skin and it was absorbed that way. I am currently having her enalapril and atenolol compounded into liquid form. I had a choice of several flavors and chose tuna.

          The only drawback is that it adds to the cost. My generic version of Lasix costs $7.91 for a 20-day supply (40 cents/day). If I have it compounded, it would be $50 for a 30-day supply ($1.67/day). But here in northern NJ, things tend to get expensive anyway.

          What I've done with the Lasix is to grind it into a powder, pinch it between my fingers and put it in her mouth. I am very careful not to miss any. The pill is ground in a clear glass bowl so any dust is visible. The marble pestle gets scraped with a knife. I wash my hands with dish soap & dry them thoroughly so nothing sticks to my fingers. Then the bowl is used for her next feeding and if there is anything left, it gets mixed into her food.


          Sue



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Marjorie Blaine
          You can have medications compounded into a fish or chicken flavored liquid or they will put them in powder form in a capsule. I like the capsule instead of
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 8, 2004
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            You can have medications compounded into a fish or chicken flavored liquid
            or they will put them in powder form in a capsule. I like the capsule
            instead of the liquid because a good compounding pharmacy will have the
            precise dose required while even with liquid, there is a tiny degree of
            variation. However, if a cat is hard to pill but will take the liquid
            willingly, I would not change to the capsule (altho the atenolol capsule is
            a small size--small enough that Max doesn't realize it's in his mouth but
            not so small that it makes it difficult to pill him). Compounding doesn't
            necessarily mean that they mix it with something else (altho they can) or
            that it has to be in a transdermal gel. And yes, it is correct that
            medications done this way are more expensive. If I just buy a 30 day supply
            of atenolol, it's about $6. To have it compounded, it's $30. But I have
            the assurance that he got it all and got the correct dosage.



            Marjorie
            Sitka,Teddi,Gus,and Max
          • brinkett
            ... flavored liquid ... They can also be compounded into treats. The only drawback is that if a cat stops eating, then they won t eat their treats either. We
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 8, 2004
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              > You can have medications compounded into a fish or chicken
              flavored liquid
              > or they will put them in powder form in a capsule.

              They can also be compounded into treats. The only drawback is that
              if a cat stops eating, then they won't eat their treats either. We
              always kept some transdermal gel on hand for those occasions.

              Sarah.
            • Linda Fischbach
              Always remember to follow a pill/capsule with a chaser -- usually a syringe of water or baby food (no onion). Otherwise the pill/capsule has a good chance
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 8, 2004
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                Always remember to follow a pill/capsule with a "chaser" -- usually a
                syringe of water or baby food (no onion). Otherwise the pill/capsule has a
                good chance of getting stuck in the esophagus.

                Often compounding enough meds for a few months is a lot less expensive than
                getting a month at a time; for most prescriptions (compounded or not) there
                is a "dispensing" charge each time. Most compounding meds are good for 6
                months.

                Linda

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Marjorie Blaine" <spikeb62@...>
                To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 2:45 PM
                Subject: [FH] Compounding meds


                >
                > You can have medications compounded into a fish or chicken flavored liquid
                > or they will put them in powder form in a capsule. I like the capsule
                > instead of the liquid because a good compounding pharmacy will have the
                > precise dose required while even with liquid, there is a tiny degree of
                > variation. However, if a cat is hard to pill but will take the liquid
                > willingly, I would not change to the capsule (altho the atenolol capsule
                is
                > a small size--small enough that Max doesn't realize it's in his mouth but
                > not so small that it makes it difficult to pill him). Compounding doesn't
                > necessarily mean that they mix it with something else (altho they can) or
                > that it has to be in a transdermal gel. And yes, it is correct that
                > medications done this way are more expensive. If I just buy a 30 day
                supply
                > of atenolol, it's about $6. To have it compounded, it's $30. But I have
                > the assurance that he got it all and got the correct dosage.
                >
                >
                >
                > Marjorie
                > Sitka,Teddi,Gus,and Max
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Your reply will go to the author of this message. If you feel your reply w
                ill benefit the entire group, please change the "To:" line to
                feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
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                >
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                >
                >
              • Garet and Shannon
                Does 1/4 25 mg atenelol pill need to be chased? They are so tiny and I just put them on the back of Daisy s tongue and she gags and then swallows it. Shannon
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 8, 2004
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                  Does 1/4 25 mg atenelol pill need to be chased? They are so tiny and I just put them on the back of Daisy's tongue and she gags and then swallows it.

                  Shannon
                  Daisy: 3 year old Maine Coon mix, asymptomatic HCM, diagnosed 12/02, 6.25 mg atenelol per day
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Linda Fischbach
                  To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com ; Marjorie Blaine
                  Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 2:07 PM
                  Subject: Re: [FH] Compounding meds


                  Always remember to follow a pill/capsule with a "chaser" -- usually a
                  syringe of water or baby food (no onion). Otherwise the pill/capsule has a
                  good chance of getting stuck in the esophagus.

                  Often compounding enough meds for a few months is a lot less expensive than
                  getting a month at a time; for most prescriptions (compounded or not) there
                  is a "dispensing" charge each time. Most compounding meds are good for 6
                  months.

                  Linda

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Marjorie Blaine" <spikeb62@...>
                  To: <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 2:45 PM
                  Subject: [FH] Compounding meds


                  >
                  > You can have medications compounded into a fish or chicken flavored liquid
                  > or they will put them in powder form in a capsule. I like the capsule
                  > instead of the liquid because a good compounding pharmacy will have the
                  > precise dose required while even with liquid, there is a tiny degree of
                  > variation. However, if a cat is hard to pill but will take the liquid
                  > willingly, I would not change to the capsule (altho the atenolol capsule
                  is
                  > a small size--small enough that Max doesn't realize it's in his mouth but
                  > not so small that it makes it difficult to pill him). Compounding doesn't
                  > necessarily mean that they mix it with something else (altho they can) or
                  > that it has to be in a transdermal gel. And yes, it is correct that
                  > medications done this way are more expensive. If I just buy a 30 day
                  supply
                  > of atenolol, it's about $6. To have it compounded, it's $30. But I have
                  > the assurance that he got it all and got the correct dosage.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Marjorie
                  > Sitka,Teddi,Gus,and Max
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your reply will go to the author of this message. If you feel your reply w
                  ill benefit the entire group, please change the "To:" line to
                  feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >




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                • Susan Aufieri
                  I just uploaded a document into our files area called Erosive Esophogitis.doc . Abby & I also belong to the feline-IBD group, which is where this came from.
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 9, 2004
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                    I just uploaded a document into our "files" area called "Erosive Esophogitis.doc". Abby & I
                    also belong to the feline-IBD group, which is where this came from. Dr. Lisa is one of our
                    members.

                    Susan

                    --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Garet and Shannon" <garet@c...> wrote:
                    > Does 1/4 25 mg atenelol pill need to be chased? They are so tiny and I just put them on
                    the back of Daisy's tongue and she gags and then swallows it.
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