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abducted elbows with meatloaf position

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  • katy4282003
    ok. what does abducted elbows with meatloaf position mean? i read on one of the messages here that this is something to watch for but i have now idea what it
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
      ok. what does abducted elbows with meatloaf position mean? i read on
      one of the messages here that this is something to watch for but i
      have now idea what it means......

      >^..^<
      i feel dumb

      katy & belle
    • turkishangoraathumanesociety
      Don t...I have no clue either... ;) ... on
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
        Don't...I have no clue either... ;)

        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "katy4282003" <katy_van@h...>
        wrote:
        >
        > ok. what does abducted elbows with meatloaf position mean? i read
        on
        > one of the messages here that this is something to watch for but i
        > have now idea what it means......
        >
        > >^..^<
        > i feel dumb
        >
        > katy & belle
      • Lois Benes at Cox
        abducted: Physiology To draw away from the midline of the body or from an adjacent part or limb. (Picture the front paws with elbows sticking out at an angle
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
          abducted: Physiology To draw away from the midline of the body or from an
          adjacent part or limb. (Picture the front paws with elbows sticking out at
          an angle – away from the body, rather than parallel to the body which is
          normal for a cat in sitting position.)

          Add: meatloaf position…Haven’t got a clue as to what this addition would
          mean.

          Maybe someone can take it from here. Lois






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • tygergirl55
          - Dont feel dumb !! Good for you to ask; your concerned about your kitty and want to know what to watch for. Know about this meatloaf position, only because
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
            - Dont feel 'dumb'!! Good for you to ask; your concerned about your
            kitty and want to know what to watch for.
            Know about this 'meatloaf' position, only because used to volunteer
            at cat shelter, and someone told me...was one of the ways we would
            look out for a cat maybe not feeling okay.
            Its when their resting more upright; front paws tucked under, and
            their back legs also under their body. Their head is more upright.
            Since their front and back legs are mostly 'under' their body, its
            supposed to 'resemble' a meatloaf. (not sure about elbows being
            abducted). And they may not be not feeling well. Doesnt mean that
            whenever a cat rests like this, they are ill.
            If your cat generally likes to sleep/rest curled up, or on side,
            stretched out, etc., and she starts laying around all hunched up,
            seeming uncomfortable, then its something to watch out for.
            Strange way of describing this, but it seemed to be true for several
            cats when their not feeling good.
            lynda, trina and markie
            >
            > ok. what does abducted elbows with meatloaf position mean? i read
            on
            > one of the messages here that this is something to watch for but i
            > have now idea what it means......
            >
            > >^..^<
            > i feel dumb
            >
            > katy & belle
          • Susan
            ... Know about this meatloaf position, only because ... It s true that meatloaf can mean a cat is not feeling well for a variety of reasons. Apparently the
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
              --- tygergirl55 <tygergirl55@...> wrote:
              Know about this 'meatloaf' position, only because
              > used to volunteer
              > at cat shelter, and someone told me...was one of the
              > ways we would
              > look out for a cat maybe not feeling okay.
              > Its when their resting more upright; front paws
              > tucked under, and
              > their back legs also under their body. Their head is
              > more upright.
              > Since their front and back legs are mostly 'under'
              > their body, its
              > supposed to 'resemble' a meatloaf. (not sure about
              > elbows being
              > abducted).

              It's true that meatloaf can mean a cat is not feeling
              well for a variety of reasons. Apparently the cat and
              dog assume different positions when they are in
              respiratory distress, whether it be from heart disease
              or asthma. A dog stands with abducted elbows, a cat
              hunchs down in meatloaf position with abducted elbows.
              I'm not sure what it looks like though. However if you
              see a cat that is in respiratory distress and they are
              laying on their side and changing positions as if they
              cannot get comfortable they are in danger of imminent
              respiratory failure. This is called lateral
              recumbancy, meatloaf is called sternal recumbancy.

              There is a really good article in the links section on
              Emergency evaluation of respiratory distress.

              http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00100.htm

              One should look for the postural manifestations of
              dyspnea such as an extended neck, abducted elbows,
              open mouth breathing, an anxious facial expression,
              increased abdominal movement, and paradoxical
              abdominal movement. Straightening of the neck and open
              mouth breathing occur in both dogs and cats, however,
              some other postural manifestations of more severe
              dyspnea vary between species. Dogs prefer to stand
              with abducted elbows, while cats tend to sit in
              sternal recumbency. Constantly changing body position
              in cats implies a much worse degree of dyspnea than it
              does in dogs. Lateral recumbency due to dyspnea is a
              serious sign in a dog; however, it often means
              impending respiratory arrest in a cat.

              Susan




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            • Susan
              ... Lois, Thanks. I had pictured it as elbows sticking outward, but wasn t sure. Meatloaf is layperson speak for sternal recumbancy. In a cat lateral
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
                --- Lois Benes at Cox <lkbenes@...> wrote:

                >
                > abducted: Physiology To draw away from the midline
                > of the body or from an
                > adjacent part or limb. (Picture the front paws with
                > elbows sticking out at
                > an angle � away from the body, rather than parallel
                > to the body which is
                > normal for a cat in sitting position.)
                >
                > Add: meatloaf position�Haven�t got a clue as to
                > what this addition would
                > mean.
                >
                > Maybe someone can take it from here. Lois
                >
                Lois,

                Thanks. I had pictured it as elbows sticking outward,
                but wasn't sure. Meatloaf is layperson speak for
                sternal recumbancy. In a cat lateral recumbancy is
                even worse in a cat in respiratory distress.

                Susan




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                Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page.
                www.yahoo.com
              • jen
                Hello All (Again!), When kitties are in respiratory distress, they will stretch their elbows away from their body. This increases the functional area of the
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 10, 2004
                  Hello All (Again!),

                  When kitties are in respiratory distress, they will stretch their
                  elbows away from their body. This increases the functional area of
                  the lungs by increasing the chest cavity size. It may also reduce
                  the energy needed to expand the chest with each respiration. Once
                  the kitty reaches the point of lateral recumbancy, or lying on their
                  side, they are in acute distress and must be transported to the
                  emerg. immediately.

                  Interestingly, humans do the same thing; they lean forward, put
                  their hands on their knees and "wing" their elbows out.

                  jen, deagan and kira the dog
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