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Re: [FH] Fluid buildup

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  • lclarizia@aol.com
    In a message dated 10/25/2004 6:20:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... As you may have read, Baby Boy built up a ton of fluid this weekend. He had a
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 25, 2004
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      In a message dated 10/25/2004 6:20:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      edapeach@... writes:


      > How do you know if fluid is building up inside your kitty's chest? Any
      > specific signs to watch out for? What causes the fluid to build up?
      >

      As you may have read, Baby Boy built up a ton of fluid this weekend. He had
      a thoracocentesis (chest tap) yesterday and today.

      His first symptom was "breathing funny." His breath rate was normal, for him
      -- about 28 breaths per minute, but the vet had told me, and I'd read here
      that rate isn't everything -- any change in breathing could indicate a problem.
      Baby Boy was breathing at a normal rate, but just a little harder -- I could
      see his whole upper body moved when he breathed, which is *not* normal for
      him. It also seemed like there was more abdominal movement, but that was not so
      clear -- he's such a skinny minny that it always looks like he's pulling in
      his abdomen more than my fat cat (aka "control cat") does. He was still eating
      and all that initially, but that stopped ... he ate at the vet's today and
      just had a little bit here. Basically, you should know what your cat's baseline
      breathing pattern and rate is -- i.e. how s/he breaths and how often. Any
      change in this that last for more than a few minutes is something to be watched
      and taken care of.

      As for what causes it -- someone else can probably give you a better
      explanation, but here's mine: When the heart is unable to pump blood through at a
      good rate, the blood "backs up" -- and through a bunch of other mechanisms, this
      causes fluid to collect in the lungs (pulmonary edema) and between the lungs
      and their lining (pleural effusion). It can also get between the heart and its
      lining (pericardial effusion).

      Lisa


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