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Re: Anesthesia for a 6mo Heart Murmur (1-3/6)?

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  • turkishangoraathumanesociety
    I would strongly suggest against any injectible anesthesia...my vet has on our chart (for ALL of our pets) NO INJECTIBLE ANESTHESIA EVER...He admits gas is
    Message 1 of 3 , May 4, 2004
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      I would strongly suggest against any injectible anesthesia...my vet
      has on our chart (for ALL of our pets) NO INJECTIBLE ANESTHESIA
      EVER...He admits gas is safer...I would steer clear of any vet that
      has a problem with that, as they are likely letting their ego get in
      the way (ie: many do not like 'being told what to use'). Ketamine is
      probably the worst offender for heart patients. Gas gas only...and
      only where absolutely necessary. What I mean is...a heart kitty
      should never be anesthecized unless it is an urgent matter (not
      dental cleaning or other non urgent reasons people sedate these
      days). Good luck


      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Della Hengel" <hengel@o...>
      wrote:
      > I'm just curious what most folks would think is the most appropriate
      > anesthesia for a kitten that was originally diagnosed as
      hydrocephalus, but
      > ultimately has a heart murmur that ranges from 1-3 on a scale of 6,
      > depending on her state of nervousness (her pulse is routinely in
      the 200-220
      > range when she's nervous as well).
      >
      > She is a little over 4 lbs at 6 months old (she was born on or
      around
      > October 20, 2003), and has always been what I tend to call "a
      kitten in
      > miniature". She acts her age (and enjoys nipping at everyone's
      hocks, as
      > that's where her head meets most of the other kitties legs!) and
      otherwise
      > healthy.
      >
      > My vet and I have discussed a little about different anesthesia,
      and I will
      > be going with what he is more comfortable with in this situation,
      as I do
      > completely trust them (heck, I'm having her fixed at my full price
      vet that
      > I take my permanents to, and Dawn is a foster, because they DO have
      the
      > emergency equipment for just about anything that happens).
      >
      > I just want to know what other folks consider.
      >
      > Della
      >
      >
      >
      > Cat Haven, Inc
      > A No-Kill Cat Rescue (501c3)
      > Houston, Tx
      > www.cat-haven.org
    • Susan Aufieri
      Reminds me of Abby s former vet wanting to subject her to a full endoscopy procedure under anesthesia. I told him he was going to have to do a heck of a song
      Message 2 of 3 , May 4, 2004
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        Reminds me of Abby's former vet wanting to subject her to a full
        endoscopy procedure under anesthesia. I told him he was going to have
        to do a "heck of a song and dance" to convince me that a 14 year old
        hear kitty should get scoped for IBD when there are other ways to rule
        it in/out. Needless to say, she's got a new group of vets at the helm.

        Any procedure, from routine shots to dental cleaning to
        surgery/anesthesia always carries some risk.

        Susan & Abby, 14 y.o. with HCM w/tachycardia, Grade 3 murmur, sometimes
        pancreatic, IBD (?) tabby that suffers from peripheral neuropathy, can
        go anorexic and is NOW Hyper-T to boot; daily meds 12.5 mg Lasix,
        12.5mg atenolol, 5mg Methamazole, thiamine sub-q's. (gadz that's a
        mouthful!)

        On May 4, 2004, at 6:11 PM, feline-heart@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        > What I mean is...a heart kitty
        > should never be anesthecized unless it is an urgent matter (not
        > dental cleaning or other non urgent reasons people sedate these
        > days).
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