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Re: [FH] Re: I'm in Shock

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  • Susan
    ... I agree with Sarah. from what you described, the shifting of position in a cat is indicative of impending respiratory arrest. As far as how a cat can go
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 30, 2004
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      --- brinkett <scrubbrush@...> wrote:
      > > My guilt is that I stressed her out because she
      > hates riding in a
      > > car. On the otherhand, I was afraid to wait for
      > morning to take
      > her
      > > to her regular vet. I now wonder if I caused her
      > death or whether
      > I
      > > couldn't have saved her regardless.
      >
      > I'm sorry to hear about Freckles. I don't think you
      > had any choice
      > but to take her to the vet. She was having problems
      > breathing and I
      > doubt the situation would have resolved on its own
      > without
      > veterinary intervention. As for the urinating, cats
      > often do this
      > when they are stressed. It sounds like you did the
      > right thing even
      > though Freckles unfortunately passed away.
      >
      > Sarah.

      I agree with Sarah. from what you described, the
      shifting of position in a cat is indicative of
      impending respiratory arrest. As far as how a cat can
      go from seemingly normal to life threatening
      respiratory distress so quickly, it is because cats
      hide evidence of disease or trauma as an evolutionary
      mechanism to avoid becoming prey.

      the following article states
      Emergency Respiratory Assessment
      http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00100.htm

      "Straightening of the neck and open mouth breathing
      occur in both dogs and cats, however, some other
      postural manifestations of more severe dyspnea vary
      between species. Dogs prefer to stand with abducted
      elbows, while cats tend to sit in sternal recumbency.
      Constantly changing body position in cats implies a
      much worse degree of dyspnea than it does in dogs.
      Lateral recumbency due to dyspnea is a serious sign in
      a dog; however, it often means impending respiratory
      arrest in a cat. Another flag to pull out the
      endotracheal tubes is the marked mydriasis that cats
      will develop immediately prior to respiratory arrest."

      "The vast majority of cats that present for dyspnea
      have pleural effusion, heart disease, or asthma."

      Susan


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