Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

atenolol and enalapril

Expand Messages
  • Susan
    ... Jamiya, I just skimmed the following, but nothing jumped out at me regarding jumpiness as an adverse effect. Maybe pilling has got him upset. I use a
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 3, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      --- Jamia Wolfsister <jamia_w@...> wrote:
      > He is on atenolol and enalapril. Thanks so much!
      > Jamiya


      Jamiya,

      I just skimmed the following, but nothing jumped out
      at me regarding jumpiness as an adverse effect. Maybe
      pilling has got him upset. I use a pilling reward
      technique and my cat loves pilling. He gets human
      cocktail shrimp after pilling.

      From Merck Veterinary Manual:

      enalapril
      http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/190206.htm

      atenolol:
      http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/190212.htm

      I also have atenolol from Plumb's Handbook of
      Veterinary Drugs pasted below:
      (keep in mind these are possible adverse effects, and
      this was written before the gold standard human CHF
      treatment regimen of diuretic + ACE-inhibitor +
      Beta-Blocker was embraced by some vet cardiologists)

      "Plumb Handbook of Veterinaty Drugs:

      Contraindications/Precautions/Reproductive Safety

      Atenolol is contraindicated in patients with overt
      heart failure, hypersensitivity to this class of
      agents, greater than first degree heart block, or
      sinus bradycardia. beta-blockers are
      generally contraindicated in patients with CHF unless
      secondary to a tachyarrhythmia responsive to
      beta-blocker therapy. They are also relatively
      contraindicated in patients with bronchospastic lung
      disease.

      Atenolol should be used cautiously in patients with
      significant renal insufficiency. It should also be
      used cautiously in patients with sinus node
      dysfunction.

      Atenolol (at high dosages) can mask the symptoms
      associated with hypoglycemia. It can also cause
      hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia and, therefore, should
      be used cautiously in labile diabetic patients.

      Atenolol can mask the symptoms associated with
      thyrotoxicosis, but it may be used clinically to treat
      the symptoms associated with this
      condition.

      Adverse Effects/Warnings

      It is reported that adverse effects most commonly
      occur in geriatric animals or those that have acute
      decompensating heart disease. Adverse effects
      considered to be clinically relevant include:
      bradycardia, lethargy and depression, impaired AV
      conduction, CHF or worsening of heart failure,
      hypotension, hypoglycemia, and bronchoconstriction
      (less so with beta1 specific drugs like
      atenolol). Syncope and diarrhea have also been
      reported in canine patients with beta blockers.
      Lethargy and hypotension may be noted
      within 1 hour of administration.

      Exacerbation of symptoms have been reported following
      abrupt cessation of beta-blockers in humans. It is
      recommended to withdraw therapy gradually in patients
      who have been receiving the drug chronically."

      BTW I put the Merck's Veterinary Drug Manual in the
      links section.

      Susan



      =====
      Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

      __________________________________
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Search - Find what you�re looking for faster
      http://search.yahoo.com
    • Sara
      What exactly does asymptomatic mean? I know it means no symptoms , but does it mean the cat doesnt act any differently? Or if Toby had an accelerated heart
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 3, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        What exactly does asymptomatic mean? I know it means "no symptoms", but does it mean the cat doesnt act any differently? Or if Toby had an accelerated heart beat before he got on Atenolol, but now its in the normal range with it, he is still asymptomatic? Is a cat that is asymptomatic have a regular heartbeat without meds?

        We're going to Tufts on Monday for his 6 mos ultrasound. Does someone know of a good reference for an easy to understand definition of HCM?

        Thanks!

        Sara and Toby

        Toby - 2 yr old Persian, dx 10/03 with obstructive HCM, 6.25 mg Atenolol daily, 81 mg aspirin every 4 days.



        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Search - Find what you�re looking for faster.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Susan
        ... Sara, I believe asymtomatic means that a cat is not in CHF. By CHF I do not mean obvious to the layperson CHF (respiratory distress). Vets classify CHF by
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 3, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          --- Sara <sara5266@...> wrote:
          >
          > What exactly does asymptomatic mean? I know it
          > means "no symptoms", but does it mean the cat doesnt
          > act any differently? Or if Toby had an accelerated
          > heart beat before he got on Atenolol, but now its in
          > the normal range with it, he is still asymptomatic?
          > Is a cat that is asymptomatic have a regular
          > heartbeat without meds?
          >
          > We're going to Tufts on Monday for his 6 mos
          > ultrasound. Does someone know of a good reference
          > for an easy to understand definition of HCM?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > Sara and Toby
          >
          > Toby - 2 yr old Persian, dx 10/03 with obstructive
          > HCM, 6.25 mg Atenolol daily, 81 mg aspirin every 4
          > days.

          Sara,

          I believe asymtomatic means that a cat is not in CHF.
          By CHF I do not mean obvious to the layperson CHF
          (respiratory distress). Vets classify CHF by stages.
          For instance I have read a cardiologist (Fox maybe)
          that talked about how a vet defines the beginning of
          CHF. So I think the answer to your question is that
          Toby was and is asymptomatic as he is only on atenolol
          (no lasix).

          If you have not looked at the links section lately
          there are many more written by vets for other vets
          articles as I have finally organized my bookmarks and
          added a bunch including some very recently written
          ones. My favorites right now is by Clarke Atkins, he
          is currently doing the continuing cardiology education
          lecture circuit:

          Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:
          What�s new and relevant in 2002?


          http://www.vetlatranquera.com.ar/pages/wild/small_animal_2.htm

          I also like Fox, Miller, Keene and Bonagura.


          I find that I may not understand everything I read,
          but I do get the gist of the articles, and going back
          and rereading them occasionally helps as my
          comprehension increases.

          Susan

          =====
          Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Search - Find what you�re looking for faster
          http://search.yahoo.com
        • Deena
          Sara, these are great questions and ones you should ask during your echo. Try to read up and see if you can find a good picture of the inner workings of the
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 3, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Sara, these are great questions and ones you should ask during your
            echo. Try to read up and see if you can find a good picture of the
            inner workings of the feline heart. On the walls of the echo room,
            they have paintings of the different areas of a normal heart and
            will explain the difference between a normal heart and what they
            find with Toby. There may be lots of people in the room, but don't
            let it intimidate you...ask away. You're at a teaching institution
            and that's their job.

            "I believe asymtomatic means that a cat is not in CHF."
            Asymptomatic might mean different things. Mr Pepe had his repeat
            echo last week. There is no mention of CHF in this report where
            before it was listed as "advanced". Since Dr Rush closed the book
            on him, I certainly would not think he would be asymptomatic. Do
            you know what cardiologist they scheduled you with?

            Good luck and let me know how it goes.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.