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Re: [FH] Blood Pressure

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  • Susan
    ... From what I read feline hyertension is associated with CRF and hyperT and is usually seen in middle aged cats. As far as why vets attempt to do blood
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 25, 2004
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      --- lkscopes <leslks@...> wrote:
      > Susan,
      > According to this info. indirect means two things.
      > No way for me to
      > know without the vet telling me what he did as to
      > whether it was
      > doppler or not.
      > Why are we doing these tests if they are so
      > inaccurate? I am really
      > unsure now about the whole thing. :(

      From what I read feline hyertension is associated with
      CRF and hyperT and is usually seen in middle aged
      cats. As far as why vets attempt to do blood pressure
      even though it is inaccurate, it is probably because
      it can cause detached retinas if untreated.

      Susan

      >
      >
      > --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Susan
      > <somnamblst@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > --- lkscopes <leslks@a...> wrote:
      > > > What is the difference between an indirect and
      > > > doppler BP?
      > > >
      > >
      > > from:
      > >
      >
      http://www.vetinfo.com/catlab.html#Blood%20pressure%20monitoring
      > >
      > > "Blood pressure monitoring
      > > Blood pressure monitoring in dogs and cats will
      > become
      > > more common as time
      > > goes on. At present there are some problems with
      > > equipment and there does
      > > not seem to be a clear consensus on blood pressure
      > > normal values.
      > >
      > > It is harder to measure blood pressure in dogs and
      > > cats than it is in
      > > humans because of the variances in size, anatomy
      > and
      > > willingness to sit
      > > still and allow the process to take place. There
      > are
      > > three methods for
      > > obtaining reasonably accurate blood pressure
      > > measurement.
      > >
      > > The oldest and most accurate is placement of a
      > > catheter directly into the
      > > artery and direct measurement of the pressure
      > using a
      > > manometer. Most vets
      > > are not really anxious to place arterial catheters
      > in
      > > patients for routine
      > > monitoring of blood pressure.
      > >
      > > Two methods of "indirect" blood pressure
      > measurement
      > > are also used. One
      > > uses a Doppler system and the other an
      > oscillometric
      > > system. The
      > > oscillometric system is probably more accurate but
      > > doesn't work well for
      > > pets weighing less than fifteen pounds making it
      > > impractical for use in
      > > most cats and many small dogs. It measures both
      > > systolic and diastolic
      > > pressure. The Doppler system only measures
      > systolic
      > > pressure. It can be
      > > used in any size patient but is not considered to
      > be
      > > as accurate and
      > > requires a trained operator.
      > >
      > > The definition of hypertension varies from
      > reference
      > > to reference. Dr.
      > > Morgan's "Handbook of Small Animal Practice" lists
      > the
      > > range for normal
      > > arterial blood pressure as 130 to 180 for systolic
      > > pressure and 60 to 100
      > > for diastolic pressure and makes no distinction
      > > between dogs and cats. I
      > > have seen references that suggest that anything
      > over
      > > 120 may be
      > > hypertension in the cat and that the high end of
      > > normal systolic pressure
      > > in the dog may be as high as 210. Blood pressure
      > is
      > > known to vary among
      > > breeds of dogs and that may explain some of the
      > > reported differences.
      > >
      > > Blood pressure devices cost between $900 and $3500
      > > new. It is possible to
      > > buy oscillometric units used from the human market
      > and
      > > modify the cuffs for
      > > pets but the savings aren't all that great after
      > doing
      > > that and the
      > > machines are more sensitive to the human blood
      > > pressure ranges which are
      > > lower than those of pets making them a little more
      > > inaccurate for vets. To
      > > be able to monitor blood pressure with reasonable
      > > accuracy the cuffs must
      > > be correctly sized.
      > >
      > > One of the problems with veterinary medicine is
      > that
      > > this cost must be
      > > recovered in some manner and the office visit
      > price is
      > > usually competitive
      > > in veterinary medicine so that isn't a good place
      > to
      > > make it up. But people
      > > are used to having their blood pressure taken as
      > part
      > > of an office visit at
      > > their doctor's so a separate charge can be hard to
      > > justify, too. So vets
      > > are buying one or two machines that are probably
      > not
      > > going to be money
      > > makers and for which the accuracy is a little
      > > questionable and normal
      > > values hard to find. Many vets, looking at all of
      > > this, opt not to buy the
      > > machines.
      > >
      > > Mike Richards, DVM"
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > __________________________________
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      >


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