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Re: [FH] How can I successfully administer a pill?

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  • ACP
    It is called a Pill Popper . You have to make sure you get the pill back far enough in the mouth, so the cat won t spit it out. IMHO, they are wonderful and
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 30, 2003
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      It is called a "Pill Popper".
      You have to make sure you get the pill back far enough in the mouth,
      so the cat won't spit it out. IMHO, they are wonderful and I've used
      them for the past 20 years.
      :-)
      acp
      ---------
      formemyself wrote:

      >Ivan my 13 yr old male takes 2 meds 2x daily. His Vet gave me this lil
      >plunger like device(sounds awful,its not) it reminds me of an olive
      >picker upper. You put the pill in the end thats rubberized and then
      >put in back of cats throat. Ive been doing this since June and he sees
      >it coming and just stays there until Im done. In 6 months he's only
      >popped out pills 2x :)
      >
      ************************
    • Laurie Sekiguchi
      I m new at this (see below), but I m finding that my best bet is using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the cat s mouth and following
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 1, 2003
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        I'm new at this (see below), but I'm finding that my best bet is
        using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the
        cat's mouth and following that immediately with his favorite treat. I
        appreciate the helpful advice on the angle at which to squirt. The
        solution is supposed to be tuna-flavored, but he absolutely hates it,
        and it takes two of us. Still, he's a 16-pound cat who absolutely
        refuses to open his mouth for anyone, so it seems easier than
        pilling. For the tiny dose of aspirin, I pulverize it and mix it into
        his canned food in the morning.

        We only discovered the problem a week ago, when Simba (age 7) started
        panting. We called off our Thanksgiving travel plans, since he was
        touch-and-go for a while. But my parents aren't well, either, so we
        can't put off going indefinitely. Have people had good experiences
        with pet sitters in terms of administering medicine? What about the
        stress factor for the kitty? (I generally assume the cat is happier
        at home even if he's alone most of the time, but being administered
        medicine by a stranger sounds very stressful.)
        --

        Laurie Sekiguchi
      • Sara
        Hi Laurie I m going to be going through the same thing very soon, we re going to Florida for a few days in a few weeks. I also have a big guy who doesnt pill
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 2003
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          Hi Laurie

          I'm going to be going through the same thing very soon, we're going to Florida for a few days in a few weeks.

          I also have a big guy who doesnt pill very well at all. And I refuse to traumitize him (and me!) everyday for the rest of his life. So I've been putting his aspirin and Atenolol into these salmon treats I bought online, which he looks forward to taking everyday. They are kind of flaky so I put it in the middle, run some water over it and sort of mold it around the pill. (also, I use children's chewable aspirin so he doesnt bite into any bitterness, the Atenolol is so tiny I dont think he can taste it) They are called Slammin Salmon and I buy them off waggintails.com if you want to try that. I can't find them in stores.

          But when we go away, I dont even think he would take a treat from a stranger and he does need his medicine so that could be a problem. So I think in this case I'm going to have my mom come by and give him the liquid form, just so I know he's getting his meds. He does so well with his treats, but he runs from anyone other than me and my boyfriend, so in this case it will have to be by force. At least its just for a few days, and I think you are right, they are happier being at home in their own environment. Personally, I wouldnt trust a pet sitter in my home, unless I knew them)



          Laurie Sekiguchi <bermaguchi@...> wrote:
          I'm new at this (see below), but I'm finding that my best bet is
          using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the
          cat's mouth and following that immediately with his favorite treat. I
          appreciate the helpful advice on the angle at which to squirt. The
          solution is supposed to be tuna-flavored, but he absolutely hates it,
          and it takes two of us. Still, he's a 16-pound cat who absolutely
          refuses to open his mouth for anyone, so it seems easier than
          pilling. For the tiny dose of aspirin, I pulverize it and mix it into
          his canned food in the morning.

          We only discovered the problem a week ago, when Simba (age 7) started
          panting. We called off our Thanksgiving travel plans, since he was
          touch-and-go for a while. But my parents aren't well, either, so we
          can't put off going indefinitely. Have people had good experiences
          with pet sitters in terms of administering medicine? What about the
          stress factor for the kitty? (I generally assume the cat is happier
          at home even if he's alone most of the time, but being administered
          medicine by a stranger sounds very stressful.)
          --

          Laurie Sekiguchi

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        • savionna@aol.com
          Hi Laurie, In a message dated 12/1/03 11:39:10 AM, bermaguchi@comcast.net writes:
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 2003
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            Hi Laurie,

            In a message dated 12/1/03 11:39:10 AM, bermaguchi@... writes:

            << I'm new at this (see below), but I'm finding that my best bet is
            using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the
            cat's mouth >>

            You mean a syringe, right? But without the needle. A 3ml needleless syringe
            (or two) is a handy thing to have around.

            << The
            solution is supposed to be tuna-flavored, but he absolutely hates it >>

            That's certainly possible. A couple of things to consider are:

            1) If the solution was ready-made...and the pharmacy (or vet or whoever)
            simply added tuna flavoring to it...the flavor may not be able to mask the native
            taste of the meds

            2) Even if a compounder made it up from scratch, the native taste may be too
            strong to be overcome with a flavoring. Some compounders will also add other
            substances, besides the meat/fish flavor, to try to enhance taste (eg, stevia,
            a sweetner, to overcome bitterness)...altho that is tough to do for a cat.

            3) He doesn't like tuna...but maybe would like chicken or beef (eg).

            << Still, he's a 16-pound cat who absolutely
            refuses to open his mouth for anyone >>

            How many ml/cc do you give? If it's a small amt, you can try putting the tip
            of the syringe in the jowl pouch...which doesn't require opening the mouth per
            se. But you can only squirt in a small amt (like 0.5) at any one time,
            waiting for the cat to swallow in between.

            Also, are you talking with the cat, explaining what you're doing and why?
            Even if the conversation doesn't change the cat's behavior one iota, it will
            change your actions toward the cat, which ultimately changes the relationship
            between you.

            Another thing to think about for highly stressed cats is a flower essence.
            While Rescue Remedy (a blend of five essences) is the best known, there are 38
            single Bach's essences (and hundreds of others from other brands) that may be
            useful for your particular cat and situation. Simply "match" the action of the
            essence to the specifics of the cat's personality and situation. See
            www.bachflower.com...and click on "38 Essences" and "Pets." // Rosemary
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