Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [FH] How can I successfully administer a pill?

Expand Messages
  • savionna@aol.com
    Hi J + D, In a message dated 11/29/03 12:13:25 PM, metpecker@yahoo.com writes:
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 29, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi J + D,

      In a message dated 11/29/03 12:13:25 PM, metpecker@... writes:

      << My Max was diagnosed about 2 weeks ago, and our vet
      prescribed a 1/2 tablet to be given orally once a day.
      My hubby and I are having a real problem giving Max
      his pill....
      How are all of you
      administering medicine to your kitties? Any advice
      would be helpful at this point. >>

      This site outlines a useful, gentle technique (with photographs) for pilling
      a cat: www.marvistavet.com/html/pilling_a_cat.html.

      Another thing to consider is an approach that respects the cats autonomy and
      brings the cat into a partnership in his care. This can include talking with
      the cat...to let him know what you intend to do and then talking thru each
      step...and also asking for his cooperation, thanking him for letting you do what's
      needed to keep him healthy, and asking forgiveness for any mistakes. If
      someone grabbed you, wrapped you in a blanket, and tried to shove a pill down your
      throat without letting you know, you might balk, too.

      After giving a pill, it's important to chase it with food. For a study about
      esophageal transit in cats, see:

      www.electronicipc.com/JournalEZ/detail.cfm?code=04290010610610
      "Esophageal transit of capsules in clinically normal cats" from American
      Journal of Veterinary Research, June 2000; Vol. 61, No. 6, pp655-57

      www.vetmed.ufl.edu/vmth/tailsn01.pdf

      If, after a fair trail, it proves impossible to pill the cat, most
      medications can be made into either a flavored solution that a cat can lick up or that
      can be syringed (which requires another technique to avoid aspiration)...or
      into a flavored chewable treat. Flavored solutions can be made by a compounding
      pharmacist, who make up the med from scratch (as opposed to putting a flavoring
      into a premade suspension). For compounders, look in the phone book or see
      www.iacprx.org. BCP Veterinary Pharmacy in Houston is one compounder that makes
      chewable treats. See www.bcpvetpharm.com. // Rosemary
    • Laurie Sekiguchi
      ... Yikes. What is that technique? -- Laurie Sekiguchi
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 29, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        At 2:15 PM -0500 11/29/03, savionna@... wrote:
        >
        >
        >If, after a fair trail, it proves impossible to pill the cat, most
        >medications can be made into either a flavored solution that a cat
        >can lick up or that can be syringed (which requires another
        >technique to avoid aspiration)

        Yikes. What is that technique?
        --

        Laurie Sekiguchi
      • formemyself
        Ivan my 13 yr old male takes 2 meds 2x daily. His Vet gave me this lil plunger like device(sounds awful,its not) it reminds me of an olive picker upper. You
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 30, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Ivan my 13 yr old male takes 2 meds 2x daily. His Vet gave me this lil
          plunger like device(sounds awful,its not) it reminds me of an olive
          picker upper. You put the pill in the end thats rubberized and then
          put in back of cats throat. Ive been doing this since June and he sees
          it coming and just stays there until Im done. In 6 months he's only
          popped out pills 2x :)
        • savionna@aol.com
          Hi Laurie, In a message dated 11/30/03 2:57:10 AM, bermaguchi@comcast.net writes: ... Yikes. What is that technique? Administering liquid meds or remedies
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 30, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Laurie,

            In a message dated 11/30/03 2:57:10 AM, bermaguchi@... writes:

            << At 2:15 PM -0500 11/29/03, savionna@... wrote:
            >
            >If, after a fair trail, it proves impossible to pill the cat, most
            >medications can be made into either a flavored solution that a cat
            >can lick up or that can be syringed (which requires another
            >technique to avoid aspiration)

            Yikes. What is that technique? >>

            Administering liquid meds or remedies requires a slightly different techique
            than pilling a solid tab or capsule. With a tab/cap, you hold the head gently
            so that the nose is pointing to the ceiling...and the pill is aimed over the
            hump of the back of the tongue (basic description; for details, again, see
            www.marvistavet.com/html/pilling_a_cat.html).

            With a liquid, you hold the head *horizontally*...that is, in its "normal"
            position. If it's a very small amt of liquid (like 0.5cc), you can gently lift
            the corner of the jowl and syringe in the little pouch. For a larger amt, you
            open the mouth gently, insert the syringe tip in the gap of the teeth, and
            squirt the liquid *diagonally* across the tongue toward the back corner of the
            cheek, *not* aimed down the throat or to the back of the tongue. This helps avoid
            the cat's inhaling (aspirating) any liquid into the lungs. // Rosemary
          • Susan
            ... I agree. Pilling needs to be as stress free as possible. I also think it is preferable to other techniques. Mixing meds with food runs the risk of a cat
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 30, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              --- savionna@... wrote:

              >
              > Another thing to consider is an approach that
              > respects the cats autonomy and
              > brings the cat into a partnership in his care. This
              > can include talking with
              > the cat...to let him know what you intend to do and
              > then talking thru each
              > step...and also asking for his cooperation, thanking
              > him for letting you do what's
              > needed to keep him healthy, and asking forgiveness
              > for any mistakes. If
              > someone grabbed you, wrapped you in a blanket, and
              > tried to shove a pill down your
              > throat without letting you know, you might balk,
              > too.

              I agree. Pilling needs to be as stress free as
              possible. I also think it is preferable to other
              techniques. Mixing meds with food runs the risk of a
              cat developing food aversion or losing trust regarding
              food.

              I know there are many on this list who pill on the
              floor with the cat between their legs. I however use
              the back of an upholstered chair. This allows me to
              hold the cat under my armpit loosely with my left hand
              cupping his chest. This technique because of the
              height and narrowness of the chair back allows for
              minimal restraint as the cat realy can't go anywhere.

              My vet told me to find the one thing my cat is
              passionate about eating and give it to him ONLY after
              pilling. True classical conditioning. Rudy actually
              leads me to his pilling chair because his special
              people food he loves (cocktail shrimp)is sitting on a
              saucer as an after pilling treat. My vet also told me
              to stroke his forehead before pilling because this is
              what the mother cat does to calm the kittens. I have
              photos with explanatory text illustrating this
              technique in the images area of this group.

              Susan

              =====
              Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

              __________________________________
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
              http://companion.yahoo.com/
            • brinkett
              ... I think a preferable technique is one that (a) doesn t stress the cat, (b) doesn t stress the human, (c) results in the cat getting the full dose of the
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 30, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                > I agree. Pilling needs to be as stress free as
                > possible. I also think it is preferable to other
                > techniques.

                I think a preferable technique is one that (a) doesn't stress the
                cat, (b) doesn't stress the human, (c) results in the cat getting
                the full dose of the medication, and (d) is not harmful in any way
                to the cat. As long as a technique meets these criteria, it's
                fine. Pilling is not superior or preferable to other techniques as
                long as the four criteria are met.

                I've had to pill many cats over my lifetime - some were angels who
                practically took the pill themselves and required no tricks like
                giving the same treat afterwards, while for others it took more
                effort but was still possible. Morag is the first cat I've not been
                able to pill because she just won't tolerate it at all. Even at the
                vet, they have to use a pill gun with her - they can't just open her
                mouth and pop it in. Compounding her medication into treats has
                worked great for her and meets all four criteria above.

                Find a technique that works well for you and your cat (pilling,
                liquid meds, hiding in food, compounding, etc.), and if your cat
                gets all their medication with little stress, it's the preferable
                technique for you. :-)

                Sarah.
              • ACP
                It is called a Pill Popper . You have to make sure you get the pill back far enough in the mouth, so the cat won t spit it out. IMHO, they are wonderful and
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 30, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  It is called a "Pill Popper".
                  You have to make sure you get the pill back far enough in the mouth,
                  so the cat won't spit it out. IMHO, they are wonderful and I've used
                  them for the past 20 years.
                  :-)
                  acp
                  ---------
                  formemyself wrote:

                  >Ivan my 13 yr old male takes 2 meds 2x daily. His Vet gave me this lil
                  >plunger like device(sounds awful,its not) it reminds me of an olive
                  >picker upper. You put the pill in the end thats rubberized and then
                  >put in back of cats throat. Ive been doing this since June and he sees
                  >it coming and just stays there until Im done. In 6 months he's only
                  >popped out pills 2x :)
                  >
                  ************************
                • Laurie Sekiguchi
                  I m new at this (see below), but I m finding that my best bet is using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the cat s mouth and following
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 1, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I'm new at this (see below), but I'm finding that my best bet is
                    using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the
                    cat's mouth and following that immediately with his favorite treat. I
                    appreciate the helpful advice on the angle at which to squirt. The
                    solution is supposed to be tuna-flavored, but he absolutely hates it,
                    and it takes two of us. Still, he's a 16-pound cat who absolutely
                    refuses to open his mouth for anyone, so it seems easier than
                    pilling. For the tiny dose of aspirin, I pulverize it and mix it into
                    his canned food in the morning.

                    We only discovered the problem a week ago, when Simba (age 7) started
                    panting. We called off our Thanksgiving travel plans, since he was
                    touch-and-go for a while. But my parents aren't well, either, so we
                    can't put off going indefinitely. Have people had good experiences
                    with pet sitters in terms of administering medicine? What about the
                    stress factor for the kitty? (I generally assume the cat is happier
                    at home even if he's alone most of the time, but being administered
                    medicine by a stranger sounds very stressful.)
                    --

                    Laurie Sekiguchi
                  • Sara
                    Hi Laurie I m going to be going through the same thing very soon, we re going to Florida for a few days in a few weeks. I also have a big guy who doesnt pill
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 1, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Laurie

                      I'm going to be going through the same thing very soon, we're going to Florida for a few days in a few weeks.

                      I also have a big guy who doesnt pill very well at all. And I refuse to traumitize him (and me!) everyday for the rest of his life. So I've been putting his aspirin and Atenolol into these salmon treats I bought online, which he looks forward to taking everyday. They are kind of flaky so I put it in the middle, run some water over it and sort of mold it around the pill. (also, I use children's chewable aspirin so he doesnt bite into any bitterness, the Atenolol is so tiny I dont think he can taste it) They are called Slammin Salmon and I buy them off waggintails.com if you want to try that. I can't find them in stores.

                      But when we go away, I dont even think he would take a treat from a stranger and he does need his medicine so that could be a problem. So I think in this case I'm going to have my mom come by and give him the liquid form, just so I know he's getting his meds. He does so well with his treats, but he runs from anyone other than me and my boyfriend, so in this case it will have to be by force. At least its just for a few days, and I think you are right, they are happier being at home in their own environment. Personally, I wouldnt trust a pet sitter in my home, unless I knew them)



                      Laurie Sekiguchi <bermaguchi@...> wrote:
                      I'm new at this (see below), but I'm finding that my best bet is
                      using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the
                      cat's mouth and following that immediately with his favorite treat. I
                      appreciate the helpful advice on the angle at which to squirt. The
                      solution is supposed to be tuna-flavored, but he absolutely hates it,
                      and it takes two of us. Still, he's a 16-pound cat who absolutely
                      refuses to open his mouth for anyone, so it seems easier than
                      pilling. For the tiny dose of aspirin, I pulverize it and mix it into
                      his canned food in the morning.

                      We only discovered the problem a week ago, when Simba (age 7) started
                      panting. We called off our Thanksgiving travel plans, since he was
                      touch-and-go for a while. But my parents aren't well, either, so we
                      can't put off going indefinitely. Have people had good experiences
                      with pet sitters in terms of administering medicine? What about the
                      stress factor for the kitty? (I generally assume the cat is happier
                      at home even if he's alone most of the time, but being administered
                      medicine by a stranger sounds very stressful.)
                      --

                      Laurie Sekiguchi

                      Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT

                      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      feline-heart-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                      ---------------------------------
                      Do you Yahoo!?
                      Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • savionna@aol.com
                      Hi Laurie, In a message dated 12/1/03 11:39:10 AM, bermaguchi@comcast.net writes:
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 1, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi Laurie,

                        In a message dated 12/1/03 11:39:10 AM, bermaguchi@... writes:

                        << I'm new at this (see below), but I'm finding that my best bet is
                        using the little hyperdermic thingy to squirt a solution into the
                        cat's mouth >>

                        You mean a syringe, right? But without the needle. A 3ml needleless syringe
                        (or two) is a handy thing to have around.

                        << The
                        solution is supposed to be tuna-flavored, but he absolutely hates it >>

                        That's certainly possible. A couple of things to consider are:

                        1) If the solution was ready-made...and the pharmacy (or vet or whoever)
                        simply added tuna flavoring to it...the flavor may not be able to mask the native
                        taste of the meds

                        2) Even if a compounder made it up from scratch, the native taste may be too
                        strong to be overcome with a flavoring. Some compounders will also add other
                        substances, besides the meat/fish flavor, to try to enhance taste (eg, stevia,
                        a sweetner, to overcome bitterness)...altho that is tough to do for a cat.

                        3) He doesn't like tuna...but maybe would like chicken or beef (eg).

                        << Still, he's a 16-pound cat who absolutely
                        refuses to open his mouth for anyone >>

                        How many ml/cc do you give? If it's a small amt, you can try putting the tip
                        of the syringe in the jowl pouch...which doesn't require opening the mouth per
                        se. But you can only squirt in a small amt (like 0.5) at any one time,
                        waiting for the cat to swallow in between.

                        Also, are you talking with the cat, explaining what you're doing and why?
                        Even if the conversation doesn't change the cat's behavior one iota, it will
                        change your actions toward the cat, which ultimately changes the relationship
                        between you.

                        Another thing to think about for highly stressed cats is a flower essence.
                        While Rescue Remedy (a blend of five essences) is the best known, there are 38
                        single Bach's essences (and hundreds of others from other brands) that may be
                        useful for your particular cat and situation. Simply "match" the action of the
                        essence to the specifics of the cat's personality and situation. See
                        www.bachflower.com...and click on "38 Essences" and "Pets." // Rosemary
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.