Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Underlying Heart Condition?

Expand Messages
  • Kat
    Hi.. I m new here because I m worried about my cat, Misty. She s 11 and a half years old. She s never had anything really wrong with her before this
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 3, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi..

      I'm new here because I'm worried about my cat, Misty. She's 11 and a
      half years old. She's never had anything really wrong with her
      before this incident, and I've read that HCM may have no symptoms.

      Here's the scenario:

      On Thursday, I took Misty to the vet because she had been
      compulsively biting her tail, for what I thought would be a harmless
      checkup. The vet wanted to do a blood panel before giving her
      medication.

      As the assistant shaved her neck, Misty went into shock and started
      to die. It seems the stress of the situation had caused this. After
      two anti-shock injections(?) and some oxygen, she was stablized and I
      immediately rushed her home. She's alive, and not so bad now,
      although a bit wobbly on her back legs and quite fragile (I had
      noticed her back legs were a bit weak *before* I took her to the vet
      though).

      The vet said he had never seen anything that severe and sudden happen
      before. He said it could actually be an underlying heart condition,
      and was possibly triggered by the stress of the situation.

      However, we cannot bring her back to the vet to test her for anything
      because it will most likely trigger another attack. I don't know if
      she went into a heart attack or just went into shock, but either way,
      the vet told me not to risk bringing her back in.

      I love Misty with all my heart, and I want to do anything possible to
      ensure her health and well being.

      Does anyone have any idea what it could be or what the vet could be
      talking about? Is there *any* way to test for HCP other than
      Ultrasound? I've read the symptoms, but apparently the only sure way
      to tell is if you do the ultrasound. Any suggestions? I appreciate
      any input anyone may have with regards to this.


      Thanks.
      ~Kat
    • Susan
      ... Stress can reveal an underlying heart condition that the cat is hiding. She s alive, and not ... Any favoring of rear legs can be indicative of a
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 4, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        --- Kat <the_mooper@...> wrote:
        >It seems the stress of the situation had
        > caused this.

        Stress can reveal an underlying heart condition that
        the cat is hiding.


        She's alive, and not
        > so bad now,
        > although a bit wobbly on her back legs and quite
        > fragile (I had
        > noticed her back legs were a bit weak *before* I
        > took her to the vet
        > though).

        Any favoring of rear legs can be indicative of a
        thromboembolism.
        >
        > The vet said he had never seen anything that severe
        > and sudden happen
        > before. He said it could actually be an underlying
        > heart condition,
        > and was possibly triggered by the stress of the
        > situation.
        >

        >
        > I love Misty with all my heart, and I want to do
        > anything possible to
        > ensure her health and well being.
        >

        Do a search for a board certified ACVIM vet, either
        Internal Medicine or Cardiology in your state and pick
        the closest ACVIM vet. Then call them and ask about
        surviving the stress of transport for an ultrasound.
        Medication can affect the course of the disease. Good
        luck.

        Susan

        __________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard
        http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.