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Re: [FH] scaredy cat was body type

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  • shelley k
    Having rescued ferals and currently having 8(ranging in age from 10 years to 4 years) living with me with no heart problems a few thoughts come to mind. 1.
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 27 10:48 AM
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      Having rescued ferals and currently having 8(ranging in age from 10 years to
      4 years) living with me with no heart problems a few thoughts come to mind.

      1. There are alot of ferals out and it would be extremely difficult to know
      how many of them have heart problems.

      2. In my case I have lost one cat to a blod clot, HCM was diagnosed after
      death, and he was definitely not feral or afraid of much.

      3. Sweetie who has had HCM since birth isn't feral and the only time she is
      afraid is when the carrier comes out for a cat to go to the vet due to the
      fact that she has had to go so many times. It also seems to me that this is
      something that probably 99% of all cats fear.

      In my experience I can't really see a feral connection and wonder how many
      others on the list are in the same position and just haven't responded since
      it doesn't apply to their cats?

      shelley

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    • Susan
      ... True, especially since they are not screened like Maine Coons might. ... I personally have had two ferals in a row adopted from PetsMart who came from a
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 27 11:22 AM
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        --- shelley k <saknibbs@...> wrote:

        >
        > 1. There are alot of ferals out and it would be
        > extremely difficult to know
        > how many of them have heart problems.

        True, especially since they are not screened like
        Maine Coons might.
        >>
        > In my experience I can't really see a feral
        > connection and wonder how many
        > others on the list are in the same position and just
        > haven't responded since
        > it doesn't apply to their cats?

        I personally have had two ferals in a row adopted from
        PetsMart who came from a feral rescue group with early
        onset HCM. PetsMart did not publicize the origin of
        these cats. I only found out when I asked for contact
        info because Rudy was so small for his age. Rudy was
        diagnosed at a very early stage of HCM and when I
        asked my ACVIM vet what were the chances of two ferals
        in a row with HCM he said "likely" and that he
        theorized that ferals suffer from too much adrenaline
        when they are homed. That is layperson speak for
        catecholamine. As far as no one responding, I think
        some of the members whose HCM cats I remeber being
        reported were skittish were here briefly after sudden
        unexpected deaths of their cats.

        Myocyte is the name for the type of cell that the
        heart is made up of. Catecholamine (norepinehrine) not
        only damages myocytes it can result in a loss of
        contractility. Norepinephrine actually induces
        beating. Those of us who have cats on beta-blockers
        know that a slowing of the heart rate is a principal
        function of atenolol.

        Susan


        > shelley
        >
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        =====
        Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

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      • Garet and Shannon
        Tia, Daisy also looks maine coonish and is actually a mutt and she has a total roly-poly body. Shannon ... From: elanonuevo@aol.com To:
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 27 3:14 PM
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          Tia,
          Daisy also looks maine coonish and is actually a mutt and she has a total
          roly-poly body.
          Shannon
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: elanonuevo@...
          To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 10:05 PM
          Subject: [FH] scaredy cat was body type
          Don't know if they info helps you but I find your
          ideas very interesting...
          Susan, I also find it most interesting. I didn't mean to doubt your work at
          all in my previous post. You've got to be touching on something because
          you're right that a large percentage of ferals have HCM. I did forget to
          mention
          that Oz (the calm one with the HCM) does have a round roly-poly body type,
          and
          looks maine coon even though he's a "mutt". Thank you for all of the info
          you're compiling. :)

          Tia
        • deb_charych
          Hi, I missed the earlier part of this thread but thought I would chime in. Lugano who was recently diagnosed with HCM is totally tame, but he showed up on
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 1, 2003
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            Hi, I missed the earlier part of this thread but thought I would
            chime in.

            Lugano who was recently diagnosed with HCM is totally tame, but
            he 'showed up' on our deck last fall. So, we don't know how long he
            was living outside before he adopted us.

            I suspect he comes more from the 'abandoned' category than the feral
            category, but depending on how long he's been outside, he would have
            been subject to the same stresses as a feral.

            His body type is not roly poly. He is HUGE and very solid. He's 16
            pounds, but most of it is muscle.

            Hope that helps...
            deb


            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Garet and Shannon"
            <garet@c...> wrote:
            > Tia,
            > Daisy also looks maine coonish and is actually a mutt and she has
            a total
            > roly-poly body.
            > Shannon
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: elanonuevo@a...
            > To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 10:05 PM
            > Subject: [FH] scaredy cat was body type
            > Don't know if they info helps you but I find your
            > ideas very interesting...
            > Susan, I also find it most interesting. I didn't mean to doubt
            your work at
            > all in my previous post. You've got to be touching on something
            because
            > you're right that a large percentage of ferals have HCM. I did
            forget to
            > mention
            > that Oz (the calm one with the HCM) does have a round roly-poly
            body type,
            > and
            > looks maine coon even though he's a "mutt". Thank you for all of
            the info
            > you're compiling. :)
            >
            > Tia
          • Susan
            ... Deb, Thanks, I actually think ferals are stressed more by being in our homes than they are when they are camped out under a bush or porch. My first HCM
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 2, 2003
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              --- deb_charych <deb_charych@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > I suspect he comes more from the 'abandoned'
              > category than the feral
              > category, but depending on how long he's been
              > outside, he would have
              > been subject to the same stresses as a feral.
              >

              Deb,

              Thanks, I actually think ferals are stressed more by
              being in our homes than they are when they are camped
              out under a bush or porch. My first HCM kitty actually
              jumped out of a second floor window rather than be in
              the same room as a contractor who was painting the
              ceiling. My neighbors have 3 formal ferals who live on
              their front porch. They totally freak when they are
              brought in the house, so no matter how cold it is
              outside that is where they stay. After almost a year
              of beta-blockade Rudy is starting to hide less when
              someone other than myself or my husband comes into the
              house. He still keeps his distance but company can at
              least see him from a distance and speak to him as long
              as they don't get too close or move suddenly.

              Susan

              =====
              Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

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