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Body Type (structure and HCM)?

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  • Susan
    Hi, I ve had two boys die of HCM (one was 11, the other 3 1/2)...both had blue eyes, similar body structure (not related at all)...they had solid, muscular
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 24, 2003
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      Hi,
      I've had two boys die of HCM (one was 11, the other 3 1/2)...both had
      blue eyes, similar body structure (not related at all)...they had
      solid, muscular frames, stocky, but not fat, and roundish
      heads...white fur (one with tan stripes) the other pure white. They
      have their pics posted in photos....

      I now have a new kitten (3-4 mo), and he reminds me so much of them
      with his body type, and some of his personality traits (I may be
      projecting these, or looking for them), but he definately looks
      similar in structure to the ones who had HCM...

      I know Maine Coons are prone to this disease, but I am wondering if
      anyone knows anything else that is cause for suspicion? It develops so
      rapidly, I'd have to do an EKG every 6 months to find out. This kitty
      is totally healthy, good heart (according to vet no murmer, etc)...

      Just wondering if anyone has heard anything about body type and the
      disease???

      Thanks!
      Susan (aka Mamatom8)....I will post a pic of Chava (kitten) on the
      site too...so you can see.
    • Susan
      ... Other breeds affected are Ragdoll, Persian, American Shorthair. I have not seen anything that relates body type, but I have come to suspect sustained
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 25, 2003
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        --- Susan <mamatom@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know Maine Coons are prone to this disease, but I
        > am wondering if
        > anyone knows anything else that is cause for
        > suspicion?

        Other breeds affected are Ragdoll, Persian, American
        Shorthair.

        I have not seen anything that relates body type, but I
        have come to suspect sustained sympathetic activation
        AKA catecholamine (norepinephrine). I have noticed
        several FH members describing skittish temperament in
        their HCM kitties (excluding the cats with secondary
        causes such as CRF or hyperT). I personally think that
        kittens of feral captures who are placed for adoption
        through no-kill shelters are at a risk of developing a
        type of HCM caused by norepinephrine damage to the
        myocyte. If you think your cat fits this profile and
        suspect your HCM kitty may be a feral please contact
        me at somanmblst@...

        I am trying to find a vet cardiologist at a research
        facility to consider this hypothesus.

        It develops so
        > rapidly, I'd have to do an EKG every 6 months to
        > find out.

        An ultrasound would be a better choice for screening.

        Susan F

        =====
        Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

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      • adawson1971@aol.com
        I m not sure about the skittish thing. Mr. Moth was at least part Maine Coon, but personality-wise he wasn t the least bit skittish. He was very outgoing and
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 25, 2003
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          I'm not sure about the skittish thing.

          Mr. Moth was at least part Maine Coon, but personality-wise he wasn't the least bit skittish. He was very outgoing and extremely social. Generally fearless, he walked up directly to everyone and everything (except the vacuum cleaner) head on.

          And although the shelter I adopted him from had him listed as abandoned, the homeopathic vet I consulted thought it was possible that he may have been feral and not had much of a home at all.

          BTW, his heart problem was congenital.

          (G-d, I miss him so much)

          Annette

          In a message dated 8/25/2003 9:16:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time, somnamblst@... writes:

          >
          > Subj: Re: [FH] Body Type (structure and HCM)?
          > Date: 8/25/2003 9:16:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time
          > From: Susan <somnamblst@...>
          > To: Susan <mamatom@...>, feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent from the Internet (Details)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- Susan <mamatom@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I know Maine Coons are prone to this disease, but I
          > > am wondering if
          > > anyone knows anything else that is cause for
          > > suspicion?
          >
          > Other breeds affected are Ragdoll, Persian, American
          > Shorthair.
          >
          > I have not seen anything that relates body type, but I
          > have come to suspect sustained sympathetic activation
          > AKA catecholamine (norepinephrine). I have noticed
          > several FH members describing skittish temperament in
          > their HCM kitties (excluding the cats with secondary
          > causes such as CRF or hyperT). I personally think that
          > kittens of feral captures who are placed for adoption
          > through no-kill shelters are at a risk of developing a
          > type of HCM caused by norepinephrine damage to the
          > myocyte. If you think your cat fits this profile and
          > suspect your HCM kitty may be a feral please contact
          > me at somanmblst@...
          >
          > I am trying to find a vet cardiologist at a research
          > facility to consider this hypothesus.
          >
          > It develops so
          > > rapidly, I'd have to do an EKG every 6 months to
          > > find out.
          >
          > An ultrasound would be a better choice for screening.
          >
          > Susan F
          >
          > =====
          > Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling
          >
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        • Susan
          ... Actually the cat would not have to be feral but rather just having the temperament of an easily startled/ stressed cat. Sympathetic activation is part of
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 25, 2003
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            --- adawson1971@... wrote:
            > I'm not sure about the skittish thing.


            > If you think your cat fits this profile
            > and
            > > suspect your HCM kitty may be a feral please
            > contact
            > > me at somanmblst@...
            > >

            Actually the cat would not have to be feral but rather
            just having the temperament of an easily startled/
            stressed cat. Sympathetic activation is part of the
            "fight or flight" response. Sustained sympathetic
            activation is deleterious to the myocyte. I have had
            two identical temperament HCM cats adopted from
            PetsMart. I know others on this list have described
            cats who required home vet visits or hid whenever
            anyone visited. I would like to collect acse files of
            acts with this type temperament. If this is a subset
            of HCM it would be more accurately called
            catecholamine cardiomyopathy.

            Susan

            =====
            Rudy: Male DSH brown tabby, feral mom, diagnosed 09-2002 at 19 months of age with idiopathic HCM: grade 2 murmur, hyperkinetic heart, borderline normal thickening, considered asymptomatic, 12.5 mg Atenolol 1x day, 1/2 baby aspirin 2x week administered via pilling

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          • peteycat9
            Susan, My cat Checkers definately fit the roundish body type. He was very muscular, with short, rounded ears and shorten limbs. My vet thought he looked
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 25, 2003
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              Susan,
              My cat Checkers definately fit the "roundish" body type. He was
              very muscular, with short, rounded ears and shorten limbs. My vet
              thought he looked like a British Shorthair, type. (His photo is
              posted on the "Photo Page"). He fits the body type you describe but
              not the temperment part of it. Even though he came to us as a stray,
              he fit right in with our multi-cat household. He was a very
              confident, alpha cat that literally walked into our home and became
              everyone's favorite. He was calm in every sense of the word. He
              never growled, hissed or clawed at us or any of the other cats.
              Never was he skittish. This most perfect cat died of HCM at 18
              months of age. I will never understand how any cat could look and
              act so healthy and robust one day and be dying the next. He is so
              missed by all of us.
              Petey
            • elanonuevo@aol.com
              Oz isn t the least bit skittish either. He was the only long haired baby born as an oops to our female that was scheduled for spaying at 6 months old. He
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 26, 2003
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                Oz isn't the least bit skittish either. He was the only long haired baby
                born as an oops to our female that was scheduled for spaying at 6 months old. He
                wasn't feral, we held and played with all of the babies since birth. We
                didn't give any of them away until 7 weeks old. They definitely had time to
                socialize amidst our other three cats and three dogs.

                I kept Oz because I suspected something weird from birth. He always meowed
                the most and seemed to need me to hold him alot. He would be off by himself
                and suddenly call out for me. I'd answer and he'd come running to me. He still
                does that today. Very weird.

                He got diagnosed with HCM at 10 months old, four months after he'd been
                neutered and supposedly had his heart checked before anesthesia.

                One of our cats was a feral. She settles in during the cold winter months
                but can barely tolerate the other animals. In the summer she HAS to go outside
                for the most of the day or she seems to mentally break. She's quite old now
                and now sign of heart trouble :::knock on wood:::.

                Tia


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