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Clip: Dead Kennedys live in 1979

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  • Carl Zimring
    Speaking of legal battles, the DK squabble has produced a new release... http://www.icemagazine.com/stories/200/kennedys.shtm ONE OF THE OLDEST West Coast
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 2, 2003
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      Speaking of legal battles, the DK squabble has produced a new release...

      http://www.icemagazine.com/stories/200/kennedys.shtm

      ONE OF THE OLDEST West Coast punk-concert recordings surfaces in Live at
      the Deaf Club, a Dead Kennedys pressing available for the first time ever
      on January 27. Manifesto issues the 14-track set taped in San Francisco on
      March 3, 1979, which had been frozen during a prolonged legal battle
      between vocalist Jello Biafra and his former bandmates.

      A legendary document in its own right, Live at the Deaf Club predates any
      previous Kennedys recording, including the politically defiant band?s first
      single, "California ├╝ber Alles." It also marks their final show with
      short-lived second guitarist 6025 and features Beatles and Honeycombs
      covers, plus a song never recorded in the studio. It captures the band
      years before its first authorized live album, Mutiny on the Bay, did; those
      performances were drawn from Bay Area gigs held in 1982 and ?86.

      "This is the major item that was left in the vaults," founding guitarist
      East Bay Ray tells ICE. "We originally intended for it to be put out, so
      there are even some vocal overdubs here and there."

      The CD consecrates the original five-piece Kennedys -- Biafra, Ray, bassist
      Klaus Flouride, drummer Ted and 6025 -- a mere eight months after they
      formed in San Francisco in July 1978. Though they had already accumulated a
      significant local fan base by that point, this intimate gig welcomed a mere
      200 people at the Deaf Club -- literally a clubhouse for handicapped
      people, specially designed so vibrations could be felt through the floor.
      The Germs and Sleeper were also on the bill, with The Germs being one of
      the few other West Coast punk bands to release live material dating from
      the late ?70s (Germicide: Live at the Whisky, 1977).

      ?Kurt Orzeck
    • Steve Gardner
      The first live disc from the DKs that Manifesto did sounded really great...though I wasn t all that happy about the song choices. The album dragged in the
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 2, 2003
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        The first live disc from the DKs that Manifesto did sounded really great...though I wasn't all that happy about the song choices. The album dragged in the second half. But it was worth it for Kill the Poor and an awesome version of Holiday in Cambodia (awesome because of East Bay Ray's searing white hot action fretburning <g> guitar licks.)

        I do think putting vocal overdubs on a live Dead Kennedy's live record is pretty damn silly, though.

        steve

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