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Pittsburgh music (was Donnie Ad Nauseum)

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  • Carl Abraham Zimring
    --On Friday, January 31, 2003 10:04 PM +0000 Deliberate Strangers ... Oh, feel free. Between his neglect of the arts and downtown plans bent on bulldozing
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 2, 2003
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      --On Friday, January 31, 2003 10:04 PM +0000 Deliberate Strangers
      <deliberate_strangers@...> wrote:

      >> Makes you wonder how Mayor Murphy saved football and baseball against
      >> hearty public opinion, but can't seem to help the music...
      >>
      >> K
      >
      > Don't EVEN get me started!

      Oh, feel free. Between his neglect of the arts and downtown plans bent on
      bulldozing some wonderfully unique architecture in favor of suburban-style
      "big box" development, the mayor has demonstrated apathy to a major part of
      what makes Pittsburgh special. Not that we had much of a choice in the
      last election; Murphy's rival Bob O'Connor spearheaded the unsuccessful
      drive to force Backward on Forward to cease putting on all-ages concerts.
      You'd figure the administration would want to preserve the city's
      distinctive features in order to help attract and retain residents, but
      you'd be mistaken.

      Carl Z.
    • Bob Soron
      ... Is this even true anymore? Most city governments have been pretty blatant, since the 80s, about believing that tourists want large chains rather than
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 2, 2003
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        On Sun, 2 Feb 2003 9:49AM -0600, Carl Abraham Zimring wrote:

        > You'd figure the administration would want to preserve the city's
        > distinctive features in order to help attract and retain residents,
        > but
        > you'd be mistaken.

        Is this even true anymore? Most city governments have been pretty
        blatant, since the '80s, about believing that tourists want large chains
        rather than small, local, unique shops. And it isn't much of a jump from
        that to thinking that that's what will attract and retain residents,
        too. I *have* become more cynical about this since moving to Chicago --
        even now, I think Boston and the immediate suburbs are still more open
        to indies -- but I've gotten the feeling it's becoming truer
        everywhere.

        Bob, off to CompUSA for some software and then to Marshall's to replace
        some worn-out shirts
      • Carl Abraham Zimring
        --On Sunday, February 2, 2003 12:05 PM -0600 Bob Soron ... Richard M. Daley wouldn t be my choice for a patron of the arts either, especially after the
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 3, 2003
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          --On Sunday, February 2, 2003 12:05 PM -0600 Bob Soron
          <bobsoron@...> wrote:

          > On Sun, 2 Feb 2003 9:49AM -0600, Carl Abraham Zimring wrote:
          >
          >> You'd figure the administration would want to preserve the city's
          >> distinctive features in order to help attract and retain residents,
          >> but
          >> you'd be mistaken.
          >
          > Is this even true anymore? Most city governments have been pretty
          > blatant, since the '80s, about believing that tourists want large chains
          > rather than small, local, unique shops. And it isn't much of a jump from
          > that to thinking that that's what will attract and retain residents,
          > too. I *have* become more cynical about this since moving to Chicago --
          > even now, I think Boston and the immediate suburbs are still more open
          > to indies -- but I've gotten the feeling it's becoming truer
          > everywhere.

          Richard M. Daley wouldn't be my choice for a patron of the arts either,
          especially after the destruction of Maxwell Street. Chicago, however,
          doesn't constanty wring its collective hands about the need to attract and
          keep residents as the Murphy administration has since day one. Pittsburgh
          in 2003 is a much smaller city than Chicago or Boston -- or Pittsburgh in
          1963 when we had a steel industry. Our government is worried about keeping
          its younger people (and by "younger" I mean people under 70) in town but
          doesn't do much to give people a reason to live here rather than anywhere
          else. Murphy's development plans have put an Old Navy downtown. Big deal.

          On the bright side, several folks in town have made a fair amount of noise
          in the media and classrooms about keeping the (pretty damn vibrant despite
          the neglect of the city) art & music communities healthy, and a benefit of
          the population decline is that low rents allow good, large art galleries
          and performance spaces to pop up all over the place. I live on Penn
          Avenue, and driving five minutes in either direction without turning off of
          Penn can get me to a several art galleries and live music venues.

          There's more than a few people in Pittsburgh who appreciate those
          developments. I don't know that the mayor has much time for arts boosters
          like MAP or advocates of the "creative class" like Richard Florida who
          believe that supporting the arts is an important part of local economic
          developmentm but they get in the papers a lot. Some people are paying
          attention, and perhaps that attention will lead to different policies down
          the road.

          Carl Z.
        • fungusyoung <sweeney.mt@verizon.net>
          Different spin on this thread.... whatever happened to a couple of Pittsburgh mid/late 80 s bands: Half-Life and A.T.S.? Just curious. Also, can anyone tell
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 3, 2003
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            Different spin on this thread.... whatever happened to a couple of
            Pittsburgh mid/late 80's bands: Half-Life and A.T.S.? Just curious.

            Also, can anyone tell me anything about Soda Jerk? I have their last
            disc, but am kinda curious about the new one & how they are live.
            Thanks for any info.
          • Carl Abraham Zimring
            --On Tuesday, February 4, 2003 1:12 AM +0000 fungusyoung ... ATS play around from time to time; I think they were at Club Cafe last week. Half-Life, funnily
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 3, 2003
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              --On Tuesday, February 4, 2003 1:12 AM +0000 "fungusyoung
              <sweeney.mt@...>" <sweeney.mt@...> wrote:

              > Different spin on this thread.... whatever happened to a couple of
              > Pittsburgh mid/late 80's bands: Half-Life and A.T.S.? Just curious.

              ATS play around from time to time; I think they were at Club Cafe last
              week. Half-Life, funnily enough, did a reunion show in December. Dunno if
              they have plans for future activities.

              > Also, can anyone tell me anything about Soda Jerk? I have their last
              > disc, but am kinda curious about the new one & how they are live.
              > Thanks for any info.

              Haven't heard the new one yet, but they open for about half of the bands
              I've seen at Club Cafe over the past year. Solid, twangy rock with pop
              hooks. I've heard plenty of worse opening bands around here.

              Carl Z.
            • Dave Purcell
              And yet another spin -- weren t the Rave-Ups originally from Pittsburgh? I ve been listening to Chance and Book of Your Regrets a bunch the last couple of
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 4, 2003
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                And yet another spin -- weren't the Rave-Ups originally from Pittsburgh?
                I've been listening to "Chance" and "Book of Your Regrets" a bunch the
                last couple of weeks. They were a criminally underappreciated band.
                Jimmer had a band called the Lovin Miserys together a couple years ago
                with the guitarist from Concrete Blonde, but now he's back playing with
                Terry Wilson from the Rave-Ups. Terry is a mofo of rootsy guitar
                playing.

                How about the Clarks, aren't they Pittsburgh as well? I heard their
                first record and liked it well enough -- sort of Rave-Ups light. I
                haven't heard their new stuff, but they appear to have gone the
                teenybopper route...they actually played a mall here a year or so ago.

                dp



                -----Original Message-----
                Subject: [fearnwhiskey] Re: Pittsburgh music (was Donnie Ad Nauseum)


                Different spin on this thread.... whatever happened to a couple of
                Pittsburgh mid/late 80's bands: Half-Life and A.T.S.? Just curious.




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Carl Abraham Zimring
                --On Tuesday, February 4, 2003 9:26 AM -0500 Dave Purcell ... Jeez, I don t know. If they were, they haven t been terribly conspicious
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 4, 2003
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                  --On Tuesday, February 4, 2003 9:26 AM -0500 Dave Purcell <dave@...>
                  wrote:

                  > And yet another spin -- weren't the Rave-Ups originally from Pittsburgh?

                  Jeez, I don't know. If they were, they haven't been terribly conspicious
                  around here since I came to town.

                  > How about the Clarks, aren't they Pittsburgh as well? I heard their
                  > first record and liked it well enough -- sort of Rave-Ups light. I
                  > haven't heard their new stuff, but they appear to have gone the
                  > teenybopper route...they actually played a mall here a year or so ago.

                  The Clarks are from Pittsburgh and play out a lot. Can't say I'm a fan,
                  but they have quite a few around here.

                  Carl Z.
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