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Clip: American Music Club in da burgh the day before Ubu

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  • Carl Z.
    Although I am looking forward to the fireworks on Guy Fawkes Day, I wish I was in
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2, 2005
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      <http://www.pittsburghcitypaper.ws/music/story.cfm?type=Music%20Previews>

      Although I am looking forward to the fireworks on Guy Fawkes Day, I
      wish I was in Pittsburgh this weekened.

      Carl Z.
      who disagrees with Eldridge's opinion that Eitzel's better without the band.

      American Music Club
      Gutter poets reunited

      Writer: DAN ELDRIDGE

      It's a bad cliché, but I'm writing it anyway: There isn't much to be
      said about American Music Club that hasn't been said before, and
      probably in a much more eloquent fashion than what you're about to
      read here.

      So why spill more ink on the group in the first place? Two reasons:
      American Music Club is one of the independent pop genre's all-time
      classics, and what's more, it's a well-noted founding force of the
      so-called slowcore genre. It's also worth considering that
      classic-band reunions -- as hackneyed as they may be in 2005 -- remain
      news, especially when they involve songwriters as uniquely talented as
      Mark Eitzel.

      For the uninitiated, AMC formed in 1983 as something of an
      Americana/pop anomaly; Eitzel, bassist Dan Pearson and the singularly
      named guitarist Vudi wrote influential music that combined the
      attitudes and often atypical song structures of art rock with various
      twangs and rhythms that sounded more distinctly rural than urban.

      Eitzel himself has long been noted as one of the saddest songwriters
      in the business, and even though AMC reached what most still consider
      to be the band's apex in 1993 with the release of its Mercury LP, and
      even though the group called it quits two years later, Eitzel's
      prodigious output hasn't waned. He recently released yet another in an
      impressively long list of solo albums, Candy Ass. And then there's his
      newest with the reunited AMC, Love Songs for Patriots.

      Critics are, perhaps predictably, tripping over themselves to garnish
      Love Songs with positive reviews. Personally, I think the perennially
      depressed Eitzel should have ditched the band idea for good long ago;
      anyone who witnessed his stunning solo performance at the Warhol last
      year can attest to the intensity and tear-jerking power of what was
      essentially one man sitting in a chair and strumming a guitar. So on
      that note, as newsworthy as it may be that American Music Club have
      re-joined forces after 10 long years, here's hoping Eitzel will get
      some solo time when his band visits Pittsburgh this week. If that
      doesn't happen, this reunion may become something sadder than its
      original breakup.

      American Music Club. 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 4. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St.,
      South Side. $10. 412-431-4950
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